Catalog Year 2017/2018
 

Prepares students to work as an entry-level sign language interpreter to facilitate and mediate communication between Deaf/hard of hearing and hearing people. Students will develop receptive and expressive skills in American Sign Language. Students will experience a variety of learning environments, including classroom work, laboratory practice and field placement. Students will be required to have both in-class and out-of-class experiences with members of the Deaf community to further develop ASL fluency and cultural competency. Upon graduation, students will be prepared to work as an entry-level interpreter in the field or to continue their studies at a four-year institution.

*Students are required to take the American Sign Language Proficiency Interview (ASLPI) before applying for the program. A score of 2.0 or higher is required for acceptance into the program. Students who do not have a proficiency in the language should meet with the Program Manager or an Advisor for assistance in enrolling in the ASL Studies Certificate to acquire the needed language proficiency to take the ASLPI.

*Students are required to maintain a C or higher in all ITR courses in order to continue in the program.

The Sign Language Interpreter Preparatory Program offers degree and certificate programs designed to provide students with a strong foundation of knowledge, skills, and practical experience to become successful working interpreters. Courses teach theoretical, ethical, cultural and practical knowledge of the interpreting field, as well as cognitive processing skills to effectively interpret to prepare students for entry-level sign language interpreter positions or to transfer to a four-year institution

The A.A.S. degree program is ideal for students who want to become ASL interpreters and do not already hold a degree. 

The certificate program is ideal for students who want to become ASL interpreters, but already hold a degree. 

 

Contact

Leslie Puzio
Program Manager
240.629.7819

Karen Santelli
Academic Office Manager
301.846.2512
F-143

Sign Language Brochure


Interpreter Preparatory Program
Program Application
 
  • Students must complete their English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement (list page 43).
  • CORE: The General Education CORE (page 42) is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) (recommend MA 206) 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences 
 
Social Science Elective (GenEd course list) (recommend PS 101, SO 101, or HS 102) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
ASLS 203 American Sign Language IV (if ASLS 203 is not needed, recommend CMSP 105) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (recommend BI 107) 3
General Education Electives 
 
ASLS 106 Introduction to Deaf Community and History 3
(GenEd course list) (recommend CMSP 103, SO 102, or SO 212) 3

PE/Health Requirement 

1

Departmental Requirements

 
ASLS 211 ASL Linguistics 3
ITR 104 Introduction to Interpreting 3
ITR 110 Interactive Discourse Analysis  3
ITR 112 Foundations of Interpreting 3
ITR 114 Consecutive Interpreting 3
ITR 212 ASL to English I    3
ITR 214 English to ASL I    3
ITR 216 Transliterating I 3
ITR 222 ASL to English II 3
ITR 224 English to ASL II 3
ITR 226 Transliterating II 3
ITR 230 Internship Seminar & Interpreting Environment 2
INTR 103 Internship         3
   
Total 60

To meet the Career Goal of becoming an ASL Interpreter:

Step One: complete the American Sign Language Studies Certificate (allows the student to become proficient in ASL and attain the pre-requisites for the A.A.S. program).
Step Two: complete the Interpreter Preparatory Program A.A.S.

 
Course  Credits
   
ASLS 106 Introduction to Deaf Community and History                3
ASLS 211 ASL Linguistics 3
ITR 104 Introduction to Interpreting 3
ITR 110 Interactive Discourse Analysis 3
ITR 112 Foundations of Interpreting 3
ITR 114 Consecutive Interpreting  3
ITR 212 ASL to English I    3
ITR 214 English to ASL I 3
ITR 216 Transliterating I 3
ITR 222 ASL to English II 3
ITR 224 English to ASL II 3
ITR 226 Transliterating II 3
ITR 230 Internship Seminar & Interpreting Environment 2
INTR 103 Internship 3
   
Total 41

To meet the Career Goal of becoming an ASL Interpreter:

Step One: complete the American Sign Language Studies Certificate (allows the student to become proficient in ASL to meet the pre-requisites  for the Certificate program).
Step Two: complete the Interpreter Preparatory Program Certificate
 

As one of only two programs in the state, this program prepares individuals to work as an entry-level sign language interpreter who facilitate and mediate communication between Deaf/hard of hearing and hearing people. Interpreters must convey accurate messages, tone, and intent of participants, whether those messages are spoken or signed. Above average competency in English and strong American Sign Language skills are necessary. A strong academic background and traits that demonstrate maturity, responsibility, flexibility, and the ability to work well under pressure are assets.

Students experience a variety of learning environments, including classroom work, computer lab practice/assessment and field placement. Students will be required to have both in-class and out-of-class experiences with members of the Deaf Community to further develop ASL fluency and cultural awareness. Frederick County is the largest Deaf community in the state and its proximity to metro areas creates a high demand for interpreters.

The mean annual wage for interpreters and translators in Maryland was $62,910 in May 2015. Wages are higher in the District of Columbia, with a mean annual wage of $83,280. Employment of interpreters and translators nationally is projected to grow 29 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for American Sign Language interpreters is expected to grow rapidly, driven by the increasing use of video relay services.

An estimated 3,000 Deaf people and more than 6,000 American Sign Language users live, work and attend school in Frederick County. These Deaf communities offer ASL students many opportunities to work within the ASL culture.

 

  1. Apply theoretical, ethical, cultural and practical knowledge of the interpreting field needed to pass the RID certification knowledge written test.

  2. Understand major linguistic features of ASL and English and the major cultural features of Deaf and non-Deaf communities.

  3. Possess cognitive processing skills to effectively interpret between English and American Sign Language and to transliterate between spoken English and a signed form of English.

  4. Comprehend different modes of interpreting/transliterating (i.e. consecutive and simultaneous) and to choose the appropriate mode in a given setting/situation.

  5. Provide an accurate and appropriate transfer of a message from a source language into a target language from the point of view of style, culture, and the linguistic needs of the consumers.

  6. Possess techniques and understand logistics in order to manage the setting. 

Q: How long does it take to complete the associate degree and certificate programs?
A: Both the associate degree and the certificate depend on whether you have any language base or not. If there is no language base, then the programs will take you four years (8 semesters). If a strong ASL base is attained, then the programs will take you 2.5 years (5 semesters).
 
 Q:  When can I start classes at FCC? 
A: Varying classes are offered in the Summer (June), Fall (August) and Spring (January).
 
Q: How many credits and what classes should I register for my first semester?
A: New Interpreter Prep students should meet with the Program Manager to determine what to take.
 
Q: Can I transfer credit for courses taken at another school?
A: Because of the unique nature of our curriculum, only select course work can be considered for transfer credit for interpreting courses. Eligibility will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis during the advisement process.
 
Q: How do I apply for Financial Aid?
A: Contact the FCC Financial Aid Office at 301-846-2480 and file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov. FCC’s Federal Code is 002071.
 
Q:  When can I start classes at FCC?
A: Varying classes are offered in the Summer (June), Fall (August) and Spring (January).
 
Q: How many credits and what classes should I register for my first semester?
A: New Interpreter Prep students should meet with the Program Manager to determine what to take.
 
Q: Can I transfer credit for courses taken at another school?
A: Because of the unique nature of our curriculum, only select course work can be considered for transfer credit for interpreting courses. Eligibility will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis during the advisement process.
 
Q: How do I apply for Financial Aid?
A: Contact the FCC Financial Aid Office at 301-846-2480 and file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov. FCC’s Federal Code is 002071.
 
Note: If you are interested in the IPP and have no language base, you must declare your major ASL Studies Certificate for your first three semesters. You can then change your major once you are enrolled in INTP 104- Introduction to Interpreting. 


FCC’s Interpreter Preparatory Program conducts all classes at our campus at 7932 Oppossumtown Pike Frederick, Maryland, 21702.

Classes will utilize both lecture classrooms, as well as computer labs for skill practice and assessment. 
The Interpreter Preparatory Program at FCC benefits from the guidance of an advisory committee that represents the Interpreting field and the professional and educational communities.

The Committee meets a minimum of twice annually to review the program and industry trends. The members of the committee ensure changes in legislation, certification and education remain consistent with program requirements.