Catalog year 2016/2017
 

  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
     
     
    Course Credits
    English
     
    EN 101–English Composition 3
    Mathematics
     
    MA 210–Calculus I 4
    Social & Behavioral Sciences
     
    Two courses selected from different disciplines 6
    Arts & Humanities
     
    Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
    Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
    Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
    Biological & Physical Sciences 
     
    CH 101–General Chemistry 4
    Biological & Physical Sciences Lab course (GenEd course list) 4
       
    General Education STEM Elective 4
       
    PE/Health Requirement 1/3
    Area of Concentration
     
    STEM Electives (Lab Science/Technology/Engineering/Mathematics 25
    Total 60

Choose from the following:

Any 200 level CIS course
Biology
BI 101–General Biology
BI 102–General Biology
BI 103 Anatomy & Psysiology
BI 104 Anatomy & Psysiology
BI 120–Microbiology for Allied Health
BI 203–Elements of Microbiology
BI 240–Genetics
Chemistry
CH 102–General Chemistry
CH 105–Essentials of Organic Chemistry
CH 201–Organic Chemistry
CH 202–Organic Chemistry
Engineering
EG 100–Introductory Engineering Science
EG 110–Engineering Statics
EG 210 –Mechanics of Materials
EG 211–Engineering Dynamics 
EG 214 –Engineering Thermodynamics
Mathematics
MA 111–Pre-calculus
MA 130 College Algebra
MA 131 Trigonometry with Analytic Geometry
MA 202 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
MA 207 Elementary Statistics with Probability
MA 211 Calculus II
MA 212–Calculus III
MA 213–Differential Equations
MA 214 –Introduction to MatLab
MA 218 –Linear Algebra
Physics
PY 101–Survey of Physics
PY 201–Fundamentals of Physics
PY 202–Fundamentals of Physics
PY 203–Introductory Physics I
PY 204–Introductory Physics II
PY 205–Modern Physics
Computer and Information Systems
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology
CIS 106–Object Design and Programming
CIS 111L–Microcomputer Software Applications: Open Operating Systems
CIS 111M–Personal Computer Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 140–Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming in Java
CIS 170–Security Fundamentals
CIS 179–Cybersecurity Fundamentals
CIS 180–Networking Fundamentals  
Any 200 level CIS course
Academic and Career Engagement
ACE 100–Learning Strategies

 
Suggested courses for the major may include the following depending on the transfer institution.
 
MA210  Calculus I
MA211  Calculus II
MA212  Calculus III
MA213  Differential Equations
MA218  Linear Algebra
 
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement . 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://www.acaff.usmh.usmd.edu/artweb/index.html
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Math Elective (GenEd course list) (MA 206 recommended) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social Science Elective (GenEd course list) (HS 102–Human Relations recommended) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
(GenEd course list) (PH 208 or PH 101 recommended) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Science Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design and Programming 3
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
Area of Concentration
 
CIS 111L–UNIX/Linux Operating Systems​ 3
CIS 111M–PC Operating Systems 3
CIS 170–Security Fundamentals 3
CIS 179–Cybersecurity Fundamentals 3
CIS 180–Networking Fundamentals 3
CIS 203–Systems Analysis & Design 3
CIS 212–PC Repair & Diagnostics 3
CIS 217–Network Security Forensics and Audit 3
CIS 219–Ethical Hacking and Systems Defense 3
CIS 223–Cloud Security 3
Other Requirements (select 8 credits from the following list of approved electives) 8
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology (3)
 
CIS 111B - Microcomputer Software Applications: Database (3)
 
CIS 116D–Windows (1)
 
CIS 116E–Spreadsheets (1)
 
CIS 116F - Computer Fundamentals (1)
 
CIS 140–Java Programming (3)
 
CIS 190–Cisco 1 Network Fundamentals (3)
 
CIS 191–Cisco 2 Routing Technologies (3)
 
CIS 192 - Cisco 3 Switching Technologies (3)
 
CIS 193 - Cisco 4 WAN Technologies (3)
 
CIS 204–Computer Information Sciences Project (3)
 
CIS 210–Data Communication & Management (3)
 
CIS 218–Information Security and Assurance (3)
 
CIS 224 Wireless Communications (3)
 
CIS 226 Game Scripting (3)
 
CIS 230–Database Management Systems (3)
 
EN 115–Technical Writing (3)
 
ID 225–Disaster, Crisis and Emergency Management (3)
 
INTR 103–Internship (3) *
 
Total 60

Students holding CompTIA A+ Certification may be awarded 6 credits (CIS
111M and CIS 212). Students holding CompTIA Network+ Certification may be
awarded 3 credits (CIS 180). Students holding CompTIA Security+ Certification
may be awarded 3 credits (CIS 170). Students holding CCNA Certification may
be awarded 12 credits (CIS 190, CIS191, CIS 192, and CIS 193).

Transfer Note:
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students
graduating with an A.A.S. in Cybersecurity and who are looking for transfer
opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office
at 301.846.2471 or the Program Manager of the Cybersecurity program.
• University of Maryland University College – B.S. Cybersecurity Management
and Policy
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://www.acaff.usmh.usmd.edu/artweb/index.html
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences 
 
Social & Behavioral Sciences (GenEd course list) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts and Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) (CMSP 105 or CMSP 107 recommended) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Science Elective  (GenEd course list) (BI 103, BI 117 or CH 101 recommended) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
HE 201–Stress Management 3
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement (HE 201 satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
FSA101–Fire Protection Systems 3
FSA103–Fire Investigation and Analysis 3
FSA105–Risk Assessment, Reduction, and Safety 3
FSA107–Disaster Planning and Response 3
FSA109–GIS and Technology for Fire Services  3
FSA201–Fire and Emergency Services Administration 3
FSA203–Principles of Fire Service Leadership 3
FSA205–EMS Operations 3
Other Requirements
 
FS145-EMTB–Emergency Medical Technician*  6
FS112-EVO–Emergency Vehicle Operator* 2
FS101-FFI–Firefighter I* 3
FS102-FFII–Firefighter II* 2
FS108-HMO–Hazardous Material Operations* 1
FS117-ICS–Incident Command System* 1
Total 60


* The following courses will transfer as 15 credits of work articulated from either the DFRS Recruit Fire Academy Program OR the Maryland Fire & Rescue Institute (MFRI).  OR the National Fire Academy (NFA). These classes are restricted to employees or volunteers of the Fire/EMS Department.
 
A.A.S. Degree (Career)

Prepares graduates for a career in the interactive technology capacities, such as Multimedia Artist, Visual Efforts Artist, Interactive Content Designer, Interactive Media Designer, Digital Animator, Graphic Designer, Modeling & Simulation Engineer, Simulation Application Developer, Web Developer, Game Designer, Game Developer, and Application Programmer. Game design and development skills covered include animation, graphics, 3D modeling and simulation, game engines, user interfaces, game scripting, and game programming. Students will also learn programming languages, such as Java, C++, C#, and Python.

• Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
• One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement (list page 43).
• Students should consult ARTSYS for transferability of courses within the University of Maryland System. 
• CORE: The General Education CORE (page 42) is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.
usmd.edu/

 
Course Credits
English  
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics  
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list)
(MA 206-Elementary Statistics recommended)
3/4
   
Social & Behavioral Sciences  
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (HS 102-Human Relations recommended) 3
Arts & Humanities  
Arts, Humanities, or Communications Elective (GenEd course list)
(PH 208 or PH 101 recommended)
3
Biological & Physical Sciences  
Biological or Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
General Education Elective 3
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues  
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
   
Departmental Requirements
3
CIS 175 Game Theory & Design
3
CIS 176 Game Creation
3
CIS 177 Interactive 3D Technology
3
CIS 178 3D Modeling & Animation
3
CIS 203 Systems Analysis & Design
3
CIS 225C Mobile App Programming
3
CIS 226 Game Scripting
3
CIS 227 Game Programming
4
CIS 228 Simulation & Game Development
4
 
 
Other Requirements
 
(select 9 credits from the following list of approved electives)
 
CAD 101 Introduction to AutoCAD I
3
CIS 101 Information Systems and Technology
3
CIS 111J Web Page Development
3
CIS 111L UNIX/Linux Operating System
3
CIS 116P Photoshop
1
CIS 140 Java Programming
3
CIS 201 Computer Science I
4
CIS 202 Computer Science II
4
CIS 208 C++ Programming
3
CIS 222 Computer Organization
4
CIS 225A Computer Programming Language: PHP
3
CIS 230 Database Management Systems
3
CMM 111 Communications Graphics I
3
INTR 101/INTR 102/INTR 103 Internship
1/3
Total
60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics (GenEd Course List)  3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social Science (GenEd Course List) (HS 102 recommended) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Communications (GenEd Course List) (CMSP 105 recommended) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd Course List) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emergency Issues
 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
Wellness Elective (GenEd Course List) 3
PE/Health Requirement  (Wellness elective satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 273–Business Communications 3
MDA 101–Foundations of Medical Assisting I 3
MDA 102–Foundations of Medical Assisting II 3
MDA 104–Medical Assisting Clinical I 1
MDA 109–Medical Terminology 3
MDA 110–Pharmacology for Medical Office Practice 3
MDA 112–Medical Administrative Office Applications OR  
MDA 115-Phlebotomy Skills  3
MDA 201–Medical Assisting Laboratory Procedures 3
MDA 202–Medical Assisting Clinical Skills 3
MDA 204–Medical Assisting Clinical II 2
MDA 216–Introduction to Medical Coding 3
MDA 218–Insurance Billing and Reimbursement 3
MDA 220–Introduction to Electronic Health Records 3
MDA 222-Introduction to Federal Healthcare Programs and Laws 3
Total 60
 
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
MA 210–Calculus I 4
   
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (Electives must be from two disciplines) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological or Physical Sciences Elective (Lab course) (GenEd course list) 4
Biological or Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
PE/Health Requirement 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
CIS 201–Computer Science I 4
CIS 202–Computer Science II 4
CIS 222–Computer Organization 4
CIS Electives:  Select from the following list:
CIS 111J, CIS 111L, CIS 111M, CIS 140, CIS 170, CIS 179, CIS 180, OR any CIS 200-level course
9
Mathematics Electives: Select 6/8 credits from the following:  MA 111, MA 130, MA 131, MA 202,
MA 206 or MA 207, MA 211, MA 212, MA 213, MA 218
6/8
Total 60

Transfer Note:
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.S. in Computer Science and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, please contact CIS Program Manager, Dr. Andy Yao in C-222, or at ayao@frederick.edu or 301.846.2410.

•Connecticut College - B.S. Computer Science
•Hood College - B.S. Computer Science
•University of Maryland University College – B.S. Computer Science
•University of Maryland University College – B.S. Computer Networks and Cybersecurity
•University of Maryland University College – B.S. Software Development and Security
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Arts & Humanities
 
CMSP 103–Speech Fundamentals 3
Biological & Physical Science
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (lab course) (GenEd course list) (BI 130 recommended) 4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (SO 102 recommended) 3
Interdisciplinary & Emergency Issues
 
HE 201–Stress Management 3
General Education Elective   (GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement  (HE 201 satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
CJ 101–Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJ 106–Police-Community Relations *  3
CJ 110–Criminal Law 3
CJ 204–Police Operational Services 3
CJ 212–Criminalistics * 4
CJ 220–Criminal Evidence and Procedure 3
CJ 221–Police Defense Tactics * 5
CJ 222–Police Arsenal and Procedures * 5
CJ 223–Emergency Vehicle Operations Course (EVOC) * 3
CJ 214–The Correctional Process or
ID 225–Disaster, Crisis and Emergency Management
3
SO 201–Criminology 3
Total 60


* Offered through the Recruit Police Academy Program
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list)   3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (HS 102 Human Relations recommended) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) (PH 208 recommended) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
PE/Health Requirement 1/3
Departmental Requirements 
 
BU 281–Global Awareness in the Work Environment 3
CIS 111M–PC Operating Systems 3
CIS 203–Systems Analysis & Design 3
CIS 212–PC Repair & Diagnostics 3
CIS 204–Computer Information Sciences Project or
INTR 103–Internship
3
CIS 179–Cybersecurity Fundamentals  or
CIS 218–Information Security and Assurance
3
Electives  (select from the following list) 20
Any CIS Course
 
CMM 111–Communication Graphics I (3)
 
CMM 112–Communication Graphics II (3)
 
CMM 114–Web Design (3)
 
EN 115–Technical Writing (3)
 
ID 225–Disaster, Crisis and Emergency Management (3)
 
MDA 109 Medical Terminology (3)
 
MDA 112 Medical/Administrative Office Applications (3)
 
MDA 220 Electronic Health Records (3)
 
Total 60

Students holding CompTIA A+ Certification may be awarded 6 credits (CIS 111M and
CIS 212). Students holding CompTIA Network+ Certification may be awarded 3 credits
(CIS 180). Students holding CompTIA Security+ Certification may be awarded 3 credits
(CIS 170). Students holding CCNA Certification may be awarded 12 credits (CIS 190,
CIS191, CIS 192, and CIS 193).

Transfer Note:
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students
graduating with an A.A.S. in Information Technology: Option I and who
are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the
Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
• University of Maryland University College – B.S. Computer Networks &
Cybersecurity
• University of Maryland University College – B.S. Cybersecurity Management &
Policy
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) (MA 206 recommended) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
 Social Science Elective (GenEd course list) (HS 102 recommended)  3
Arts & Humanities
 
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) (PH 208 or PH 101 recommended) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) (CMSP 105 recommended) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
 Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
Wellness Elective (HE 201 recommended) 3
PE/Health Requirement (HE 201 satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 281–Global Awareness in the Work Environment 3
CIS 111M–PC Operating Systems 3
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
CIS 203–Systems Analysis & Design 3
CIS 212–PC Repair & Diagnostics 3
CIS 179–Cybersecurity Fundamentals  or
CIS 218–Information Security and Assurance

3
CIS 190–Cisco 1 Network Fundamentals 3
CIS 191–Cisco 2 Routing Technologies 3
CIS 192–Cisco 3 Switching Technologies 3
CIS 193–Cisco 4 WAN Technologies   3
Electives  Select nine (9) credits from the following:
INTR 103, CIS 111K, CIS 111L, CIS 170, CIS 179, CIS 180, or any CIS 200-level course

9
Total 60

Students holding CompTIA A+ Certification may be awarded 6 credits (CIS
111M and CIS 212). Students holding CompTIA Network+ Certification may be
awarded 3 credits (CIS 180). Students holding CompTIA Security+ Certification
may be awarded 3 credits (CIS 170). Students holding CCNA Certification may
be awarded 12 credits (CIS 190, CIS191, CIS 192, and CIS 193).
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
 
 
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
Arts & Humanities
 
ASLS 102–American Sign Language I  or
LS 101–Introductory Spanish
3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) HE 201 or HE 204 recommended 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
PE/Health Requirements (HE 201 or HE 204 satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
ECD 101–Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3
ECD 104–Activities I for Children 3
ECD 106–Infant/Toddler Development & Care 3
ECD 107–Health, Safety and Nutrition 3
ECD 108–Activities for the School Age Child 3
ECD 210–Directed Practicum in Early Childhood  or
INTR 103–Internship
3
ECD 212–Administration of Child Development Centers 3
ECD 213–Understanding & Guiding the Young Child’s Behavior 3
ECD 230–Language & Literacy Development in Early Childhood  or
ED 214–Processes & Acquisitions of Reading (targeted for transfer students)
3
ED 100–Child Development & Behavior 3
ED 203–Foundations of Special Education  3
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication  3
Electives
 
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives. 3
Total 60
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
SO 101–Introduction to Sociology 3
ED/PS 208–Human Growth & Development 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list)  3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
CMSP 101_Introduction to Communication Studies or   
CMSP 103–Speech Fundamentals  or
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication  or
CMSP 107–Career Communications



3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology 4
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology 4
BI 120–Microbiology for Allied Health  or
BI 203–Elements of Microbiology
4
PE/Health Requirement
1
Departmental Requirements 
 
NU 101–Introduction to Clinical Nursing 6
NU 105–Pharmacology for Nurses 2
NU 211–Medical-Surgical Nursing I 7
NU 212–Medical-Surgical Nursing II 4
NU 213–Medical-Surgical Nursing III 4
NU 214–Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing 3
NU 216–Preparation for Practice 2
NU 218 - Maternal, Child and Family Nursing 5
Total 70


Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101– General Psychology  or
SO 101–Introduction to Sociology
3
Arts & Humanities
 
CMSP 103–Speech Fundamentals  or
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication  or
CMSP 107–Career Communications
3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
BI 120–Microbiology for Allied Health 4
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology and 4
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology  4
PE/Health Requirement 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
MDA 108– Basics of Medical Terminology  or
MDA 109–Medical Terminology
1/3
ST 100–Fundamentals of Surgical Technology I 6
ST 101–Introduction to Surgical Technology 6
ST 105–Clinical Practicum 5
ST 120–Surgery Essentials 3
ST 200–Fundamentals of Surgical Technology II 12
Elective 2
Total 60/65


  

Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.
 

Gainful Employment Information
 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
CIS 111M–PC Operating Systems 3
CIS 203–Systems Analysis & Design 3
CIS 212–PC Repair & Diagnostics 3
CIS 218–Information Security and Assurance OR
CIS 179-Cybersecurity Fundamentals

3
   
Electives Select 6 credits from the:
     Any BU course
     Any CIS course
     Any INTR course



6
   
Total 21

Membership in the Honors College is by invitation. Students automatically qualify with the following test scores: 

  • SAT = 1650 overall with at least 550 on verbal,
  • or ACT = Reading 21+,
  • or FCC placement exams = Honors level reading (103) and proficient college-level writing. 


A writing sample may be requested. However, applicants with strong academic records (3.5 GPA) or faculty recommendations are encouraged to apply. We also offer an Open Campus membership for high school or home school students with a 3.5 GPA and a completed Honors College recommendation form.  To apply, complete the Honors College Application and Honors Goal Survey, which are available in the Honors Office (H-245) and at www.frederick.edu/honors, and submit as directed on the forms.

Expectations
Students are expected to pursue academic excellence and be engaged in the honors program, FCC, or the community. Any student whose GPA drops below 3.0 or violates FCC policy will no longer be in good standing with the Honors program.  Students who started college poorly but whose recent work is honors caliber can apply to the honors coordinator for an exception.

Teacher Certification if you have a Bachelor’s Degree

  • Click here for comprehensive information about teaching certification programs for career changers. This is a wonderful, all-in-one resource that you should visit first.
  • Visit the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) website to learn about certification requirements.  In particular, read the information about the areas of teacher certification that are available (i.e. Elementary, Secondary English, Art, etc.).
  • Once you have determined what area of teacher certification you would like to pursue, consider which route to certification you would like to take.
  • One option is to pursue a post-baccalaureate program at a 4-year college or university in the state.  Explore the list of approved teacher education programs compiled by the Maryland State Department of Education to get started.
  • Another option is to follow the transcript analysis procedures laid out by MSDE. Essentially, the transcript analysis process requires you to submit transcripts of all your college coursework. MSDE will then evaluate the transcripts and send you a list of requirements to meet. Note that you will need to successfully complete the Basic Skills Testing requirement (see below) before your transcripts can be evaluated. It is important to read the evaluation information from MSDE very carefully as you plan how to meet the listed requirements.
 
FCC offers many classes that can help you meet MSDE coursework requirements. We offer a range of math, English, science, history, and many other content area courses. A few of the education-specific courses that might apply, depending on your certification area, are:
        * ED 100 – Child Development & Behavior (child development)
        * ED 202 – Educational Psychology (human learning)
        * ED 203 – Foundations of Special Education (inclusion of special needs populations)
        * ED/PS 208 - Human Growth and Development (child or adolescent development)
        * ED 214 – Processes and Acquisition of Reading (processes and acquisition of reading skills)
        * PS 204 – Psychology of Adolescence (adolescent development)

* While you are considering your options, here are some suggestions:
  • Consider enrolling in ED 102, Schools and Society, here at FCC. This course will allow you to explore teaching as a career, observe in K-12 settings, create a portfolio, and do a teaching demonstration. ED 102 provides a great opportunity to determine if teaching is indeed the right career field for you!
  • PRAXIS I is frequently the test of choice for those pursuing teacher certification. For more information about PRAXIS I, including how to prepare, register, and take the test, visit the ETS website.
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://www.acaff.usmh.usmd.edu/artweb/index.html
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics 
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) (BU/MA 205 recommended) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
HS 102–Human Relations (satisfies cultural competence requirement) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
General Education Elective
 
EC 201–Principles of Economics (Macro) or
PH 208–Business Ethics
3
PE/Health Requirement  1/3
Departmental Requirements 
 
ACCT 100–Business Accounting 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II 3
ACCT 111–Computerized Accounting 3
ACCT 201–Intermediate Accounting I 4
ACCT 202–Intermediate of Accounting II 4
ACCT 203–Managerial Cost Accounting 3
ACCT 233–Applied Accounting 3
ACCT 117–Payroll Accounting  or
ACCT 205–Federal Income Tax Accounting  or
ACCT 216–Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting
3
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
BU 273–Business Communications 3
CIS 111E–Spreadsheets 3
Total 60
 
 
Gainful Employment Information  

Course Credits

Departmental Requirements


 
ASLS 100–ASL Finger Spelling 2
ASLS 101–Visual Gestural Communication  3
ASLS 102–American Sign Language I  3
ASLS 103–American Sign Language II 3
ASLS 106–Introduction to the Deaf Community 3
ASLS 107–Introduction to Deaf History 3
ASLS 108–ASL Number Use 2
ASLS 202–American Sign Language III 3
ASLS 203–American Sign Language IV 3
ASLS 206–American Deaf Culture 3
INTR 103–Internship 3
Total 31
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits

English


 
EN 101–English Composition 3

Mathematics


 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4

Social & Behavioral Sciences 


 
Two courses selected from different disciplines (GenEd course list) 6

Arts & Humanities


 
AR 101–Two Dimensional Art and Design 3
​Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3

Biological & Physical Sciences


 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science  (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 3

PE/Health Requirement

1

Area of Concentration


 
AR 102–Three Dimensional Art and Design 3
AR 104–Survey of Art I (satisfies the cultural competence requirement) 3
AR 105–Survey of Art II 3
AR 106–Drawing I 3
CMM 131–Dark Room Photography I 4

Electives

12
Students should check with an advisor or transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting electives. Depending on the transfer institution and area of concentration recommended electives:

AR103 Survey of Non-Western Art
AR107 Drawing II
AR108 Painting I
AR113 Pottery I
AR114 Pottery II
AR115 Introduction to Color Theory and Design
AR203 Sculpture
AR204 Illustration I
AR207 Introduction to Watercolor I
AR213 Intermediate Sculpture

 
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits

English


 
EN 101–English Composition 3

Mathematics


 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4

Arts & Humanities


 
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3

Social & Behavioral Sciences


 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3

Biological & Physical Sciences


 
BI 101–General Biology  4
CH 101–General Chemistry 4
CH 102–General Chemistry 4

Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues


 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3

PE/Health Requirement

1/3

Departmental Requirements


 
BI 120– Microbiology for Allied Health  or
 
BI 203–Elements of Microbiology 4
BI 140–Biotechnology and Society 3
BI 220–Cell Biology and Tissue Culture 4
BPM 102–Bioprocessing Environment 3
BPM 103–Laboratory Techniques I 1
BPM 110–Bioprocessing Measurements 4
BPM 214–Techniques in Bioproduction 4
INTR 103–Internship  or
Elective (If an internship is not taken, the qualified elective must be approved by the program manager and must be at least a 200-level mathematics or science course.)
3
Electives (Recommend BI 240, BU 273, CH 201, CMSP 107, EN 115) 6/7
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Select from the GenEd course list
Recommend MA 111, MA 206, MA 207, BU/MA 205, MA 130, MA 201 or MA 210. Students should check their transfer school before choosing their course
3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences 
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines ​ (Select from the GenEd course list) (recommend HI 201, PS 101 or PI 104) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
CMSP 103–Speech Fundamentals  3
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (Lab course) (GenEd course list) BI 130 recommended 4
General Education Elective
 
SO 102–Social Problems  or
ID 209–Ethnic Diversity
3
PE/Health Requirement 1/3
Area of Concentration
 
CJ 101–Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJ 110–Criminal Law 3
CJ 204–Police Operational Services 3
CJ 214–The Correctional Process 3
CJ 220–Criminal Evidence & Procedure 3
SO 201–Criminology 3
Electives  10
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives. Depending on the transfer institution, recommended electives may include: AN101, AN103, BU/MA205, CJ108, CJ209, HS102, ID209, PH205-PH209, PS209, SO101, SO102, SO202, CIS101, INTR103. Students transferring to the University of Maryland must complete BU/MA205.
 
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) (MA 130, MA 111 or MA 201 recommended) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
HS 102–Human Relations (satisfies cultural competence requirement) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
CMSP 103–Speech Fundamentals  or
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication  or
CMSP 107–Career Communications
3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (PY 101 or PC 103 or PC 109 recommended) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
General Education Elective  (GenEd Wellness recommended) 3
PE/Health Requirement  (Wellness elective satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 272–Supervisory Management 3
BU 273–Business Communication 3
CON 101–Introduction to Construction Management 3
CON 132–Materials & Methods of Construction I 3
CON 133–Materials & Methods of Construction II 3
CON 140–Architectural Blueprint Reading 3
CON 203–Principles of Site Management 3
CON 204–Construction Project Cost Estimating 3
CON 205–Construction Accounting & Financial Management 3
CON 206–Construction Project Scheduling 3
Complete two courses (6 credits)  from those listed below 6
CAD 204–Introduction to Inventor (3)
 
CON 131–Construction Law (3)
 
CON 171–Green Building-Introduction to LEED & Other Rating Systems (3)
 
CON 200–Construction Surveying (3)
 
CON 202–Mechanical and Electrical Systems (3)
 
CON 210–BIM and Construction Management (3)
 
INTR 103–Internship (3)
 
Electives  Students should check with an advisor or transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting electives.  3
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines 6
Arts & Humanities
 
AR 100–Introduction to the Creative Arts 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
Area of Concentration
 
THR 101–Introduction to Theater 3
THR 102–Introduction to Acting 3
THR 121–Stagecraft 3
THR 206–Advanced Acting 3
Electives 16
Students should check with an advisor or institution (ARTSYS) before
selecting their electives. Depending on the transfer institution, recommended
electives may include: THR 104, THR 105, THR 110, THR 203, THR 204, THR 205, 
THR 212, THR/EN 229

 
Total 60

 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines (GenEd course list) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
AR 101–Two Dimensional Art and Design or
 
AR 106–Drawing I 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
Two courses, on of which must be a lab science (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
Area of Concentration
Computer Graphics & Television Production

 
CMM 101–Introduction to Electronic Media  3
CMM 111–Communication Graphics I  3
CMM 152–Digital Studio Production 4
INTR 102/103–Internship 2/3
Computer Graphics students should take:
 
CMM 112–Communication Graphics II  3
CMM 212–Communications Graphics III 3
CMM 132–Digital Photography I 3
CMM 114–Web Design I  3
CMM 115–Professional & Transfer Portfolio 1
Electives 3
Television Production students should take:
 
CMM 252–Digital Film Production 4
CMM 254–Principles of Film & Video Editing 4
CMM 256–Television Studio Directing and Operations  or
CMM 259–Television News Production  or
CMM 261–Digital Post Production
4
Electives 4
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives. Depending on the transfer institution, recommended electives may include: AR101, AR102, AR103, AR104, AR105, AR106 CMM114, CMM131, CMM132, CMM256, CMM259, CMM261
 
Total

Transfer Note:
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students
graduating with an A.A. in Digital Media and Design and who are looking
for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling &
Advising Office at 301.846.2471 or the Program Manager at 301.846.2533.
• Towson University – B.S. Electronic Media and Film: Film/Video/Digital Media
Concentration
• University of Maryland University College – B.A. Graphic Communication
60
Course  Credits

Requirements


 

I. Accounting and Ethics Education (32 credit hours)


 
ACCT 100–Business Accounting 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II 3
ACCT 201–Intermediate Accounting I 4
ACCT 202–Intermediate Accounting II 4
ACCT 203–Managerial Cost Accounting 3
ACCT 205–Federal Income Tax Accounting 3
ACCT 206–Federal Taxation: Corporations and Partnerships  or
ACCT 216–Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting 
3
ACCT 214–Auditing  3
PH 208–Business Ethics  or
 
PH 205–Ethics 3
Subtotal for I: 32

II. Business Related Education (21 credit hours required from five of the following eight groups)


 
Group 1: Statistics
 
MA 206– Elementary Statistics or
BU/MA 205– Business Statistics
3
Group 2: Economics
 
EC 201–Principles of Economics 3
EC 202–Principles of Economics 3
Group 3: Corporation or Business Finance
 
BU 213–Principles of Finance 3
Group 4: Management
 
BU 227–Principles of Management 3
Group 5: U.S. Business Law
 
BU 211–Business Law I 3
Group 6: Marketing
 
BU 225–Marketing 3
Group 7: Business Communication
 
BU 273–Business Communications 3
Group 8: Computer Information Systems
 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
Subtotal for II:  21
Total 53
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list)  3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences  Two courses selected from different disciplines
 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Electives (GenEd course list) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Three GenEd courses, one selected from each area: Arts, Humanities, and Communications 9
Biological & Physical Sciences (One lab course required)
 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science (GenEd course list)
 
Biological & Physical Science Electives (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
Area of Concentration
 
Students should check with an advisor or transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their courses.
 
Select 12 credits from the following: 12
SO101–Introduction to Sociology (3)
 
SO102–Social Problems (3) (meets cultural competence requirement)
 
SO201–Criminology (3)
 
SO202–Marriage and Family (3)
 
SO207–Sociology of Sexuality (3)
 
PS202–Social Psychology (3)
 
PS209–Women’s Studies (3)
 
Electives  16
Students should check with an advisor or transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives.
 
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/


 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emergency Issues
 
Wellness Elective (GenEd Course List) 3
General Education Elective
 
HS 102–Human Relations required 3
PE/Health Requirement  (Wellness elective satisfies this requirement) 1
Departmental Requirements
 
LA 100–Introduction to Law 3
LA 103–Ethics for the Legal Professional 3
LA 104–Contracts 3
LA 105–Torts 3
LA 106–Law & Technology 3
LA 110–Legal Research 3
LA 120–Legal Writing & Documents 3
LA 210–Estates & Probate 3
LA 220–Evidence & Procedure (Civil) 3
LA 230–Law of the Real Estate Business 3
LA 240–Family Law 3
CJ 110–Criminal Law 3
INTR 103–Internship 3
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
MA 206–Elementary Statistics  or
MA 207–Elementary Statistics with Probability
3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
SO 101–Introduction to Sociology 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GedEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GedEd course list) 3
EN 102–English Composition & Literature 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology 4
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology 4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines 6
   
PE/Health Requirement  (HE 102 or HE 200 elective satisfies this requirement)  
 
Area of Concentration
 
ED/PS 208–Human Growth & Development 3
BI 120–Microbiology for Allied Health  or
BI 203–Elements of Microbiology
4
CH 101–General Chemistry 4
HE 102–Nutrition in a Changing World  or
HE 200–Principles & Applications of Nutrition
3
Electives
 
Chemistry, Math or Social Science are recommended 11
Students should check with an advisor or transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives.
 
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
Arts & Humanities
 
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology 4
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology 4
BI 120–Microbiology for Allied Health 4
PE Requirement 1
Departmental Requirements
 
RC 100–Introduction to Respiratory Care 2
RC 102–Fundamentals of Respiratory Care 4
RC 103–Pharmacology 3
RC 104–Gas Exchange Physiology 2
RC 105–Cardiopulmonary & Renal Anatomy & Physiology 3
RC 107–Principles of Mechanical Ventilation 4
RC 109–Clinical Practicum I 2
RC 110–Clinical Practicum II  2
RC 202–Neonatal & Pediatric Respiratory Care 3
RC 203–Pulmonary Rehabilitation & Home Care 2
RC 204–Cardiac Monitoring & Diagnostics 4
RC 205–Professional Seminar 2
RC 206–Pulmonary Diagnostics  2
RC 207–Cardiopulmonary & Renal Pathophysiology Review 3
RC 208–Clinical Practicum III 2
RC 209–Clinical Practicum IV 2
Total 67 *


 

Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.

The Track 1 program provides a broad education in emergency management and focuses on preparedness and the skills needed to organize and lead emergency management operations.

Through a unique partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), FCC utilizes FEMA Independent Study (IS) curriculum - consisting of self-paced online courses - to deliver this valuable program to FCC students. Students complete specific FEMA IS courses, follow a simple online process to convert the coursework to college credit and then enroll in 5-week online modules to satisfy Departmental Requirements. Visit Visit FEMA IS Conversion to learn more.

Individuals interested in Track 1 are strongly encouraged to first contact the Emergency Management Academic Program Manager, prior to enrolling and prior to each semester, to facilitate the process of carefully selecting and sequencing courses based on interests and educational requirements.
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social Science Elective 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts & Humanities Elective(GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Science Elective (GenEd course list)  3/4
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 6
PE/Health Requirements 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
EM Module 1A: Foundations of Emergency Management (5-week online class) 3
    FEM 113–Comprehensive Emergency Management (IS-1.a)
 
    FEM 131–Principles of Emergency Management (IS-230.d)
 
    FEM 151–National Incident Management System (NIMS) (IS-700.a, 702.a, and 703.a)
 
EM Module 2A: Emergency Management Coordination (5-week online class) 3
    FEM 215–Disaster Medical Coordination, Monitoring and Surveillance (IS-930)
 
    ​FEM 161–Emergency Operations Center (IS-775)
 
    ​FEM 150–Incident Command System (IS-100.b and 200.b)
 
EM Module 3A: Leadership and Management (5-week online class) 3
    FEM 132–Introduction to Leadership and Influence (IS-240.b)
 
    ​FEM 133–Decision Making & Problem Solving (IS-241.b)
 
    FEM 134–Effective Communication (IS-242.b)
 
EM Module 4A: Planning and Response (5-week online class) 3
    FEM 140–Emergency Planning (IS-235.b)
 
    ​FEM 159–National Response Framework (IS-800.b)
 
    FEM 174–Disaster Response Operations (IS-26, 102.c, 293, and 634)
 
EM Module 5A: Emergency Management Mitigation (5-week online class) 3
    ​FEM 157–Hazard Mitigation (IS-393.a)
 
    ​FEM 186–Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Workforce Basics (IS-319, 320, 321, 322 323)    
 
    ​FEM 173–Continuity of Operations Planning (IS-546.a, 547.a, 548 and 550)
 
EM Module 6A: Recovery and Assessment (5-week online class) 3
    ​FEM 201–National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF) Overview (IS-2900)
 
    FEM 179–Emergency Management Recovery (IS-212.a, 395 and 559)
 
    FEM 103–Community Disaster Exercise (IS120.a and IS-130)
 
Other Requirements
 
INTR 103–Internship: Emergency Management Capstone 3
FEM Electives (Select 7 credits from FEM courses not listed above) 7
Electives 10
Total 60
 
 
Transfer Note:
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students
graduating with an A.A.S. in Emergency Management and who are looking
for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact Douglas McDaniel
Academic Program Manager, 240.629.7952.
• American Public University (APU) – B.A. Emergency and Disaster Management
• Charter Oak State College (COSC)–Public Safety Administration Concentration
• University of Maryland University College (UMUC)–B.S. Public Safety
Administration
B.S., Homeland Security
• Northwestern State University of Louisiana (NSU) - B.S. Unified Public Safety
Administration : Emergency Management Administration Concentration
• Capella University - B.S. Public Safety

For more information on taking FEM courses in this program, please visit the FEMA Web site: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/
 
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/

Students are able to meet all course requirements for this degree from the college’s selection of online courses.

 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences (Electives must be from two disciplines)
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines (GenEd course list) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Three courses, one selected from each area (GenEd course list): Arts, Humanities, and Communications 9
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement (Wellness elective satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Other Requirements
 
Open Electives  Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives. 29
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition  3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences Two courses selected from different disciplines
 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Electives (GenEd course list)   6
Arts & Humanities
 
Three GenEd courses, one selected from each area: Arts, Humanities, and Communications 9
Biological & Physical Sciences  Two courses, one of which must be a lab course
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 7/8
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues  Choose from 2 categories:
 
Computer Literacy Elective (GenEd course list)
 
Interdisciplinary Issues Elective (GenEd course list)
 
Multicultural Issues & Perspectives Elective (GenEd course list) 6
PE/Health Requirement  1/3
Area of Concentration  Students should check with an advisor or transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their courses.
 
Select two courses from the following: 6
​HI 101–History of Western Civilization
 
HI 102–History of Western Civilization
 
HI 201–History of the United States
 
​HI 202–History of the United States
 
Select three courses from the following: 9
​HI 204–Twentieth Century History
 
​HI 205–Contemporary Latin America
 
​HI 212–Civil War
 
​HI 213–History of the South
 
​HI 214–The Civil Rights Movement
 
​HI 215–Constitutional History of the United States ​
 
HI 217–African-American History
 
​ID 220–WWII Through Film
 
​ID 222–The Sixties
 
IS 911H–History Honors
 
Electives
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives.
10
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics 
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
ED/PS 208–Human Growth & Development 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Three GenEd courses, one selected from each area: Arts, Humanities, and Communications 9
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
BI 101–General Biology 4
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology 4
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement  (PE 241 satisfies the requirement) 1/3
Area of Concentration
 
PE 153–Introduction to Health and Exercise Sciences 3
PE 154–Fitness for Living 3
PE 241–Methods of Fitness & Conditioning 1
PE 247–Methods of Strength Training 1
HE 102–Nutrition in a Changing World, or
HE 200–Principles and Application of Nutrition
3
HE 204–Health Education 3
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology 4
Electives  10
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives. Depending on the transfer institution, recommended electives may include: 
 
ED 102–Foundations of Education (3)*
 
ED 202–Educational Psychology (3)*
 
ED 203–Foundations of Special Education (3)*
 
PE 161–Psychology of Sport (3)
 
PE 236–Coaching Principles (3)
 
PE 249–Fitness Assessment and Business Practices (3)
 
PE 250–Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3)
 
PE 252–Essentials of Personal Training (4)
 
HE 201–Stress Management (3)
 
CH 101–General Chemistry (4)**
 
BU 109–Entrepreneurship & Small Business Enterprise (3)
 
INTR 102–Internship  (2)
 
Any one credit PE course (1) 
 


* 
Those who are planning to teach in the K-12 system should take these courses.
** 
This course is required by many transfer schools.  See you’re advisor in order to match the elective credits to your specific transfer institution.
 

Course
Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition  3
EN 102–English Composition & Literature 3
Mathematics
 
MA 207–Elementary Statistics with Probability
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
HI 201–History of the United States or
HI 202–History of the United States
3
GG 102–Cultural Geography 3
Arts & Humanities
 
AR 100–Introduction to the Creative Arts 3
English Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
BI 100–Fundamental Concepts of Biology  or
BI 101–General Biology
4
PC 114–Contemporary Physical Science  or
PC 109–Physical Geology 
4
PC 115–Introduction to Geoscience  or
PC 107–Introductory Astronomy 
4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues 
 
HE 204–Health Education 3
Other Requirements
 
ECD 101–Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3
ECD 104–Activities I for Children 3
ED 100–Child Growth and Development 3
ED 203–Foundations of Special Education 3
ED 214–Processes and Acquisition of Reading 3
MA 105–Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics I 4
MA 106–Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics II 4
Total 63

A.A.T. requirements:
To earn the A.A.T., students must achieve a minimum of a 2.750 cumulative
GPA and earn a “C” or better in all courses used to satisfy the A.A.T.
requirements. Students must also provide the Registrar’s Office with qualifying
scores on one of the state-approved basic skills tests for future teachers.
Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor at
their transfer institution as early as possible and should be aware that some
colleges and universities may require higher GPAs and/or additional tests.
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://www.acaff.usmh.usmd.edu/artweb/index.html
Course Credits

English


 
EN 101–English Composition 3

Mathematics


 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) (MA 130 or MA 111 recommended) 3/4

Social & Behavioral Sciences


 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective  (GenEd Course List) 3

Arts & Humanities


 
Arts & Humanities Elective (GenEd Course List) 3

Biological & Physical Sciences


 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (PC 103, PY 101, or PC 109 recommended) 3/4
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 6

PE/Health Requirement

1

Departmental Requirements


 
CAD 101–Introduction to AutoCAD I 3
CAD 102–Introduction to AutoCAD II 3
CAD 200–Introduction to Architectural Drawing and Design 3
CAD 201–Residential Architecture I 4
CAD 205–Civil Drafting I with CAD 3
CON 132–Methods and Materials of Construction I 3
CON 133–Methods and Materials of Construction II 3
Electives  Choose 16 credits from any of the following areas below 16

Architecture/Construction Area


 
CAD 121–Introduction to Microstation (3)
 
CAD 130–Introduction to Revit (3)
 
CAD 202–Residential Architecture II (4)
 
CAD 204–Introduction to Inventor (3)
 
CON 101–Introduction to Construction Management (3)
 
CON 171–Green Building – Introduction to LEED & Other Rating Systems (3)
 
CON 202–Mechanical and Electrical Systems (3)
 
CON 204–Construction Project Cost Estimating (3)
 
CON 210–BIM and Construction Management (3)
 
Civil Area
 
CAD 207–Civil Drafting II with CAD (3)
 
CON 200–Construction Surveying (3)
 
General Area
 
INTR 103–Internship (3)
 
EG 100–Introduction to Engineering Science (3)
 
Electrical Area (permission of program manager required for Electrical courses)
 
BLD 141–Electrical Theory & Fundamentals (4)
 
BLD 142–Electrical Code & Application (4)
 
BLD 145–Commercial Electrical Application (4)
 
BLD 146–Specialized Systems (4)
 
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) (BU/MA 205 recommended) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
HS 102–Human Relations 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
Wellness Elective (GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement  (Wellness elective satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I  3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II  3
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
BU 211–Business Law I   3
BU 227–Principles of Management 3
BU 273–Business Communications 3
CIS 111E–Microcomputer Software Apps: Spreadsheets  or
CIS 111R–Business Software Applications
3
EC 201–Principles of Economics (Macro) 3
EC 202–Principles of Economics (Micro)  3
Electives
 
Take 12 credits from: Any BU or ACCT course not already taken,
HOS 110, HOS 121*, HOS 216, HOS 219, HOS 218, INTR 103, MDA 109,
MDA 112, MDA 216*, MDA 218, or MDA 220
12
Total 60

 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • Students should consult ARTSYS for transferability of courses within the University of Maryland System. http://www.acaff.usmh.usmd.edu/artweb/index.html. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences (Electives must be from two disciplines)
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines (GenEd course list) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Three courses, one selected from each area: Arts, Humanities, and Communications (GenEd course list) 9
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement (Wellness elective satisfies this requirement) 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
Additional required and elective credits to meet requirements of each option 29
Students should check with an advisor before selecting ​one of the following options:
art, communications, ​criminal justice, digital media design, health & exercise science,
history, human services, information systems management, music, pre-nursing, 
psychology, sociology, STEM, or theatre.

 
Total 60
Students are able to meet all course requirements for this degree from the college’s selection of online courses.
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics  Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution before selecting their Mathematics course.
 
MA201–Applied Calculus  or
MA 130–College Algebra
3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Two courses selected from two different disciplines
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution before selecting electives
6
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (Lab course) (GenEd course list) 4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology  3
PE/Health Requirement 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II 3
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
EC 201–Principles of Economics  3
EC 202–Principles of Economics 3
BU/MA 205–Business Statistics 3
Electives  10
Total 60
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course  Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list)  3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines (GenEd course list) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Three GenEd courses, one selected from each area: Arts, Humanities, and Communications 9
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
Area of Concentration
 
MU 111–Music Theory I 3
MU 112–Music Theory II 3
MU 211–Music Theory III 3
MU 212–Music Theory IV 3
MU 106–Aural & Keyboard Skills I 1
MU 107–Aural & Keyboard Skills II 1
MU 206–Aural & Keyboard Skills III 1
MU 207–Aural & Keyboard Skills IV 1
Ensemble (4 credits, 1 from each Ensemble level below) 4
Ensemble I (MU 117, MU 119, MU 121, or MU 123) 1
Ensemble II (MU 118, MU 120, MU 122, or MU 124)  1
Ensemble II (MU 217, MU 219, MU 221, or MU 223) 1
Ensemble IV (MU 218, MU 220, MU 222, or MU 224) 1
Applied Music (major instrument) 4
Applied Piano/Class Piano (4 credits, 1 from each level below)* 4
Applied Piano/Class Piano I (MU 151 or MU 172)* 1
Applied Piano/Class Piano II (MU 152 or MU 173)* 1
Applied Piano/Class Piano III (MU 251 or MU 272)* 1
Applied Piano/Class Piano IV (MU 252 or MU 273)* 1
*Students should consult with the Music Program Manager before selecting these courses.  
Total 60
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition  3
EN 102–English Composition & Literature 3
Mathematics
 
MA 207–Elementary Statistics with Probability 4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
HI 102– History of Western Civilization  or
HI 201– History of the United States  or
HI 202–History of the United States
3
GG 102–Cultural Geography 3
Arts & Humanities
 
AR 100–Introduction to the Creative Arts 3
CMSP 103– Speech Fundamentals  or
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication
3
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
BI 100– Fundamental Concepts of Biology  or
BI 101–General Biology
4
PC 114–Contemporary Physical Science 4
PC 115–Introduction to Geoscience 4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
HE 204–Health Education 3
Other Requirements
 
ED 102–Schools and Society 3
ED 202–Educational Psychology 3
ED 203–Foundations of Special Education 3
ED/PS 208–Human Growth and Development 3
ED 214–Processes and Acquisition of Reading 3
MA 105–Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics I 4
MA 106–Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics II 4
Total 63

A.A.T. requirements:
To earn the A.A.T., students must achieve a minimum of a 2.750 cumulative
GPA and earn a “C” or better in all courses used to satisfy the A.A.T.
requirements. Students must also provide the Registrar’s Office with qualifying
scores on one of the state-approved basic skills tests for future teachers.
Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor at
their transfer institution as early as possible and should be aware that some
colleges and universities may require higher GPAs and/or additional tests.
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition  3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list)  3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
ED 102–Schools & Society 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
EN 102–English Composition & Literature  3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (lab course) (GenEd course list) 4
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
Wellness Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Choose from 1 category:
 
Computer Literacy Elective (GenEd course list)
 
Interdisciplinary Issues Elective (GenEd course list)
 
Multicultural Issues & Perspectives Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Other Requirements
 
EN 201–British Literature  or
EN 202–British Literature
3
EN 203–American Literature  or
EN 204–American Literature  or
EN 230–African American Literature
3
EN 205–World Literature  or
EN 206–World Literature
3
EN 231–English Language Studies 3
ED 202–Educational Psychology 3
ED 203–Foundations of Special Education 3
History Electives (HI) 6
PS 204–Psychology of Adolescence 3
Free Elective 3
 
Total 61/63
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition  3
Mathematics
 
MA 210–Calculus I 4
MA 211–Calculus II 4
MA 212–Calculus III 4
MA 218–Linear Algebra 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
ED 102–School and Society 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
PY 203–Introductory Physics I 4
PY 204–Introductory Physics II 4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
Wellness Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Choose from 1 category:
 
Computer Literacy Elective (GenEd course list) or
Interdisciplinary Elective (GenEd course list) or
Multicultural Issues & Perspectives Elective (GenEd course list)
3
Other Requirements
 
ED 202–Educational Psychology 3
ED 203–Foundations of Special Education 3
PS 204–Psychology of Adolescence 3
Electives (recommended to include MA 111 or MA 130/131 if needed, and PY 101 if there has been no previous coursework in physics) 6/7
Total 62/63
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition  3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
ED 102–Schools and Society 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
LS 101–Introductory Spanish I 3
LS 102–Introductory Spanish II 3
LS 201–Intermediate Spanish I 3
LS 202–Intermediate Spanish II 3
Choose two consecutive courses in another language: LF, LG, LI, LL 6
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (Lab course) (GenEd course list) 4
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
Wellness Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Computer Literacy Elective (GenEd course list) or
Interdisciplinary Elective (GenEd course list) or
Multicultural Issues & Perspectives Elective (GenEd course list)
3
Other Requirements
 
ED 202–Educational Psychology 3
ED 203–Foundations of Special Education 3
PS 204–Psychology of Adolescence 3
Elective (LS 211 recommended) 3
Total 61/63
In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted students will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum. Upon completion students will earn an AAS in Nuclear Medicine Technology and a certificate in Computed Tomography. Graduates will be qualified to take the national certification exams for nuclear medicine technology and the post primary certification in Computed Tomography. The combination of focus meets the expanding needs of nuclear medicine technology that includes dual modality imaging. Prerequisites for this program include EN 101, BI 103, BI 104, CH 101, MA 130, MA 206, PY 101 and MDA 108. All courses require a grade of “C” or better. 
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
MA 130–College Algebra 3
MA 206–Elementary Statistics 3
Arts & Humanities
 
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication   3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology 4
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology 4
CH 101–General Chemistry 4
PY 101–Survey of Physics  3
PE/Health Elective * 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
NM 100–Physics and Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Technology  5
NM 102–Nuclear Medicine Technology  3
NM 103–Nuclear Medicine Techniques I  4
NM 104–Clinical Nuclear Medicine I  1
NM 105–Nuclear Medicine Techniques II  3
NM 107–Instrumentation and Computers in Nuclear Medicine Technology 4
NM 202–Clinical Nuclear Medicine II  2
NM 203–Radiopharmacy and Radiation Chemistry  2
NM 204–Clinical Nuclear Medicine III  4
NM 205–Professional Development  2
MDA 108–Basic Medical Terminology 1
Total 62/64


 

* Corrected per catalog addendum 15-16 v.1

  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
MA 206–Elementary Statistics 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
EC 201–Principles of Economics 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) (Other than EC) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences 
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (Lab course) (GenEd course list) 4
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
PE/Health Requirement 1/3
Area of Concentration
 
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II or
 
EC 202–Principles of Economics 3
CIS 201–Computer Science I 4
CIS 203–Systems Analysis & Design 3
CIS 208–C++ Programming  or
 
CIS 225–Computer Programming Language (A, B, C, D ...)  3
MA 201–Applied Calculus  or
 
MA 210–Calculus I 3/4
Electives  CIS 111J, CIS 111L, CIS 111M, CIS 140, CIS 170, CIS 179, CIS 180, MA202 or
any CIS 200-level course. Students should check with their transfer school
before selecting their electives.
9
Total 60

Transfer Note:
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students
completing their Associate degree and who are looking for transfer
opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office
at 301.846.2471 or the program manager for Computer Science.
• University of Maryland University College – B.S. Computer Science
• University of Maryland University College – B.S. Cybersecurity Management
& Policy
• University of Maryland University College – B.S. Information Systems
Management
Students will be able to:
  1. Prepare a plan that addresses organizational needs.
  2. Identify problem requirements that demonstrate understanding of user needs.
  3. Explain solutions that satisfy problem requirements.
  4. Analyze alternative solutions to determine the optimal result.
  5. Design problem solution that solves the requirements.
  6. Produce documentation that describes implementation.
  7. Integrate business, financial and/or economic models that demonstrate project feasibility.
Prepares students in administrative and clinical medical procedures and provides a foundation in the principles and practices of asepsis, initial patient contact, patient care responsibilities, and patient education. Clinical duties include collecting and performing various laboratory tests, administering medications, and performing diagnostic procedures such as EKGs. Courses in medical software applications and medical administrative and clinical internships are included in this certificate. Students are engaged in classroom, hands-on and clinical learning environments. Students must maintain a grade of “C” or better in all MDA courses. Graduates will be qualified to take the national certification examination in medical assisting offered by the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT).

Prospective students must apply for admission to the college through the Welcome Center, complete all placement tests through the Testing Center, send official transcripts (if applicable) to the registrar, and arrange for an advising appointment with the Medical Assisting Program Manager.
Courses in this program can be used to meet the elective requirements of the A.A. degree in general studies.


Gainful Employment Information

The Medical Administrative Certificate can be completed entirely online. For details, see Learning Online.

 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
MDA 101–Foundations of Medical Assisting I 3
MDA 102–Foundations of Medical Assisting II 3
MDA 104–Medical Assisting Clinical I 1
MDA 109–Medical Terminology 3
MDA 110-Pharmacology for Medical Office Practice 3
MDA 112–Medical Administrative Office Applications OR  
MDA 115-Plebotomy for Allied Health  3
MDA 201–Medical Assisting Laboratory Procedures 3
MDA 202–Medical Assisting Clinical Skills 3
MDA 204–Medical Assisting Clinical II 2
MDA 220–Introduction to Electronic Health Records 3
Total 30

*  GenEd Science course is a corequisite for MDA 201–Medical Assisting Laboratory Procedures.
 
Prepares students as entry-level nuclear medicine technologists in a specialized area of diagnostic imaging which includes both body structure and function. Nuclear medicine technologists perform procedures to assist physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Recently the nuclear medicine field has expanded to include molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET), and fusion imaging using hybrid scanners, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
NM 100–Physics and Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Technology 5
NM 102–Nuclear Medicine Technology 3
NM 103–Nuclear Medicine Techniques I 4
NM 104–Clinical Nuclear Medicine I 1
NM 105–Nuclear Medicine Techniques II 3
NM 107–Instrumentation and Computers in Nuclear Medicine Technology 4​​​
NM 202–Clinical Nuclear Medicine II 2
NM 203–Radiopharmacy and Radiation Chemistry 2
NM 204–Clinical Nuclear Medicine III 4
NM 205–Professional Development 2
Total 30


 
In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted student will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum. Upon completion students will earn a Certificate in Nuclear Medicine Technology and in Computed Tomography. Graduates will be qualified to take the national certification exams for nuclear medicine technology and the post primary certification in Computed Tomography. The combination of focus meets the expanding needs of nuclear medicine technology that includes dual modality imaging. Prerequisites for this program include EN 101, BI 103, BI 104, CH 101, MA 130, MA 206, PY 101 and MDA 108. All courses require a grade of “C” or better.
 

 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list)(Recommended MA 103) 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social Science Elective (GenEd course list) (Recommend HS 102) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts & Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) (Recommend CMSP 105) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (Gen Ed course list) (Recommended BI 117) 3
Interdisciplinary & Emergency Issues
 
HE 102 Nutrition in a Changing World 3
General Education Elective    
 (Gen Ed course list) (Recommended CIS101) 3
PE/Health Requirement  (HE 102 will satisfy the requirement)  1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
HOS 110–Introduction to Hospitality Management 3
HOS 111Culinary Fundamentals 1
HOS 112–Culinary I 3
HOS 113–Culinary II  3
HOS 114–Culinary Baking 3
HOS 121–Sanitation & Food Safety 2
HOS 123–Purchasing and Cost Control  3
HOS 210Garde Manger 4
HOS 216–Food and Beverage Operations 3
HOS 230Applied Culinary Nutrition 3
HOS 240International & Regional Cuisine 4
HOS 250Culinary Production 4
INTR 103–Internship 3
Total 60
Career

Prepares students who are interested in starting a small business or engaging in other entrepreneurial activities.
 

Gainful Employment Information
 
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 103–Introduction to Business   3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
EN 101–English Composition  or
 
BU 273–Business Communications 3
BU 109–Entrepreneurship and Small Business Enterprise  3
BU 225–Marketing 3
BU 227–Principles of Management 3
ACCT 111–Microcomputer Software Apps: Computerized Accounting  or
BU 223–Human Resources  or
BU 211–Business Law
3
Total 24
The teacher education transfer program A.A.T. comprises a curriculum that provides the first two years of a four-year bachelor’s degree and teacher certification. This curriculum prepares students to transfer to an Early Childhood Education program at a four-year college or university in the state of Maryland. The A.A.T. in Early Childhood Education articulates with the seven Maryland transfer programs in Early Childhood Education.

The program enables students to fulfill their general education requirements, participate in field work experiences, and complete a core of professional education coursework appropriate for the first two years of teacher preparation. Students may be required to take additional special education or inclusion courses as part of the requirements for a bachelor’s degree and teacher education certification at four-year institutions.
Provides students with maximum academic flexibility to meet transfer course requirements at four-year institutions. Students should meet with a counselor or advisor to select appropriate courses required by the transfer institution(s) of interest. All of the courses in this certificate may be used in the General Studies degree program.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
English Composition (GenEd course list) 3
Arts and Humanities (GenEd course list) 3
Mathematics (GenEd course list) 3
Science (GenEd course list) 3
Social Sciences (GenEd course list) 3
Electives* 15
Total 30


* Meet with a counselor or advisor to choose elective courses to fulfill additional general education requirements and/or academic major requirements of the transfer institution(s).
(Career)
Provides students with the knowledge and sills required for success in a career as an architectural CAD drafter, designer, operator, or technician.
 
Gainful Employment Information
 
Course Credits

Departmental Requirements 


 
CAD 101–Introduction to AutoCAD I 3
CAD 102–Introduction to AutoCAD II 3
CAD 200–Introduction to Architectural Drawing and Design 3
CAD 201–Residential Architecture I 4
CAD 205–Civil Drafting I with CAD 3
CON 132–Materials & Methods of Construction I 3
CON 133–Materials & Methods of Construction II 3
Technical Elective Courses – choose 8/9 credits from any of the four areas below: 8/9

Architecture/Construction Area


 
CAD 121–Introduction to Microstation (3)
 
CAD 130–Introduction to Revit (3)
 
CAD 202–Residential Architecture II (4)
 
CAD 204–Introduction to Inventor (3)
 
CON 101–Introduction to Construction Management (3)
 
CON 171–Green Building–Introduction to LEED & Other Rating Systems (3)
 
CON 202–Mechanical and Electrical Systems (3)
 
CON 204–Construction Project Cost Estimating (3)
 
CON 210–BIM and Construction Management (3)
 

Civil Area


 
CAD 207–Civil Drafting II with CAD (3)
 
CON 200–Construction Surveying (3)
 

General Area


 
INTR 103–Internship (3)
 
EG 100–Introduction to Engineering Science (3)
 

Electrical Area (permission of program manager required for Electrical courses)


 
BLD 141–Electrical Theory & Fundamentals (4)
 
BLD 142–Basic Electrical Theory & Application (4)
 
BLD 145–Advanced Electrical Application (4)
 
BLD 146–Low Voltage & Specialized Systems (4)
 
Total 30/31

Physical Education AA

Students will be able to:
  1. Students will define the role of physical education in the broader context of education both in the private and public sectors.
  2. Students will apply the knowledge and skills necessary to delay or  prevent lifestyle diseases that are prevalent in our society today.
  3. Students will identify factors that affect sports participation and motor skills performance.
  4. Students will correlate the principles of human nutrition to the functioning of the human body.
  5. Students will interpret results of wellness, fitness and nutrition evaluations.
Transfer

Designed for students who want depth and breadth in studying the Civil War era. This certificate would especially benefit either history majors or those who have a keen interest in a more comprehensive treatment of the Civil War than one course can offer. Included in the certificate are courses addressing a detailed examination of the causes of the war, the war itself, the legacies of the war, and an in-depth research project relating to the war.
 
 
Course  Credits
Area of Concentration 
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
HI 201–History of the United States to 1865 3
HI 212–Civil War 3
HI 299–History Independent Study (Civil War History)  or
IS 911H– History Honors and
IS 912H–Honors Forum
4
HI 217– African-American History or
HI 213– History of the South or
HI 215–Constitutional History of the United States
3
Total 16
Frederick Community College’s Respiratory Care program trains students in diagnosis, treatment, management, and preventative care for patients with cardiopulmonary disorders. Respiratory therapists may specialize in areas such as neonatal care, cardiopulmonary diagnostics, pediatric ICU or adult critical care. While the majority of respiratory therapists work in hospitals, many work in physicians’ offices, home health agencies, and assisted living facilities.

The Respiratory Care program prepares students with the knowledge, skills, and behavior expected of registered respiratory therapists (RRTs) in general careers within the field, and qualifies them to take the National Board for Respiratory Care’s entry level and advanced practitioner exams. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC), 1248 Harwood Road, Bedford, Texas 76021-4244. (817) 283-2835.

Click here to view CoARC’s Programmatic Outcomes Data page.

FCC offers an Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree in Respiratory Care, a 21-month, 67 credit program (24 courses) with 900 hours of clinical experience.

Students participate in classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences. The laboratory work provides the opportunity for hands-on experience in preparation for clinical practice in diverse clinical settings.

Clinical sites include Frederick Memorial Hospital, Medstar Montgomery Medical Center, Saint Agnes Hospital, University of Maryland Medical System and Shady Grove Adventist Hospital.
For individuals already in this field of employment who wish to increase their opportunities by acquiring college credentials. In addition, individuals who already have a degree in another field may be able to improve employment opportunities.

Gainful Employment Information

 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
HS 102–Human Relations 3
LA 100–Introduction to Law 3
LA 103–Ethics for the Legal Professional 3
LA 104–Contracts 3
LA 105–Torts 3
LA 106–Law & Technology 3
LA 110–Legal Research 3
LA 120–Legal Writing & Documents 3
LA 220–Evidence & Procedure (Civil) 3
Select at least three (3) credits from the following courses:
 
LA 210–Estates & Probate (3)
 
LA 230–Law of the Real Estate Business (3)
 
LA 240–Family Law (3)
 
CJ 110–Criminal Law (3)
 
BU 211–Business Law I (3)
 
INTR 103–Internship (3) 3
Total 33
Students will be able to:
  1. Understand the sociological perspective which is defined as the ability to see the connections between our personal experience and the larger forces of history.
  2. Perform sociological analyses on selected contemporary social issues (e.g., education, poverty, globalization, war).
  3. Describe sociological research methods and interpret sociological research.
  4. Identify and articulate the interplay of macro and micro level structural forces and the influence of culture in shaping behavior.
  5. Understand the stratified nature of globalization and the importance of intercultural differences within and between local and global communities.
  6. Communicate effectively on how sociology contributes to an understanding of the social world.
  7. Develop sociological knowledge, skills, and values that can be applied in transfer programs and various occupations.
  8. Recognize how social life is structured in ways that influence choices, opportunities, and action.
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition  3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list)(MA 201 or MA 206 recommended) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social & Behavioral Sciences Electives (GenEd course list) selected from different disciplines 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts & Humanities Electives (GenEd course list) 
 
Three courses, one selected from each area: Arts, ​Humanities (recommend world language) and ​Communications 9
Biological & Physical Sciences  One lab course required)
 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science (GenEd Course List) ​
 
Biological & Physical Science Lab Course (recommend BI 101) 4
Biological & Physical Science (recommend BI 117 or BI 107) 3/4
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
Area of Concentration
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
​PS 202–Social Psychology 3
​PS 206–Abnormal Psychology 3
​ED/PS 208–Human Growth and Development  3
Electives 16
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting their electives.
Depending on the transfer institution, recommended electives might include:
PS 204, PS 205, PS 207, PS 209, SO 101, SO 102, SO 202, or world language 

 
Total 60

 
The Certified Public Accountant (CPA) designation is a nationally recognized achievement that denotes being at the top of the profession. Salaries for accountants who have passed the CPA exam are 10 to 15% higher than for those without this certification, according to Robert A. Half International, one of the world’s largest accounting staff placement firms.

The state of Maryland requires candidates for the Uniform CPA examination to have completed 150 college credits and obtained a bachelor’s degree in any area of study. As part of the 150 credit hour requirement, candidates must complete specific courses in accounting, business-related subjects, and ethics as described in state regulations.

FCC’s CPA Exam Prep certificate program is designed for students who have a baccalaureate degree but need to complete the additional course requirements to sit for the CPA exam in Maryland.

The program teaches skills required in:
  • financial accounting and reporting, 
  • managerial cost accounting, 
  • federal income tax accounting, 
  • auditing,
  • ethics, and
  • business topics related to management, finance, law, marketing, economics, business communications, and statistics. 
Career

Designed to provide the core skills needed to function in the fields of graphic communication, publishing and Web based design. The challenging and rapidly changing world of visual communications requires creative problem-solving using a combination of tools and techniques. In hands-on classes, students solve design problems with instruction from active communications professionals, using hardware and software they will encounter in the workplace. College-level reading and writing is expected.

Gainful Employment Information
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CMM 101–Introduction to Electronic Media  3
CMM 111–Communications Graphics I  3
CMM 112–Communications Graphics II  3
CMM 114–Web Design I 3
CMM 115–Professional & Transfer Portfolio 1
CMM 131–Darkroom Photography I  or
CMM 132–Digital Photography
3/4
CMM 152–Digital Studio Production  4
CMM 212–Communications Graphics III  3
INTR 102–Internship 2
Total 25/26
Provides students with the technical knowledge and skills required for a career in construction management.

Gainful Employment Information
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CON 101–Introduction to Construction Management 3
CON 132–Methods and Materials of Construction I 3
CON 133–Materials and Methods of Construction II 3
CON 140–Architectural Blueprint Reading 3
CON 203–Principles of Site Management 3
CON 204–Construction Project Cost Estimating 3
CON 205–Construction Accounting & Financial Management 3
CON 206–Construction Project Scheduling 3
Total 24
Targets the field in criminal justice that focuses on the sentencing and treatment of offenders after they have been convicted of crimes. The certificate is designed to prepare students for employment in the corrections field, including state and federal prisons and county detention centers. The certificate program is also designed to help corrections officers improve their work-related skills and advance within their chosen careers.

 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
CJ 101–Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJ 110–Criminal Law 3
CJ 214–The Correctional Process 3
EN 101–English Composition 3
PE 154–Fitness for Living 3
PS 101–General Psychology 3
PS 104–Issues of Drug/Alcohol Use 3
SO 102–Social Problems 3
SO 201–Criminology 3
Total 27
Prepares individuals to work as process operators in biological products manufacturing facilities. Students will combine basic science and communication skills, manufacturing technologies and good manufacturing practices in the course of study. Students will develop a strong basic science foundation with a sound understanding of the major technologies employed in the industry. They will also develop collaborative and disciplined work ethics while consistently practicing problem-solving skills. Upon successful completion of the program, individuals will possess the necessary skills to qualify for employment in a variety of bioprocessing industries.

Gainful Employment Information
 
Course Credits

Departmental Requirements 


 
BI 101–General Biology 4
BI 120– Microbiology for Allied Health  or
BI 203–Elements of Microbiology
4
BI 140–Biotechnology and Society 3
BI 220–Cell Biology and Tissue Culture 4
BPM 102–Bioprocessing Environment 3
BPM 103–Laboratory Techniques I 1
BPM 110–Bioprocessing Measurements 4
BPM 214–Techniques in Bioproduction 4
CH 101–General Chemistry 4
CH 102–General Chemistry 4
Total 35
FCC’s 31-credit certificate program in American Sign Language introduces students to the history, culture and community of the Deaf as students work toward mastery of American Sign Language. Students acquire foundational skills and vocabulary through coursework and internships. As they become involved in the Deaf community, students learn to communicate through this unique non-verbal language, gaining confidence in their skills and greater understanding and acceptance of the Deaf community. All courses are taught by Deaf people who take pride in their language and culture.

The availability of VideoPhones has increased demand for ASL interpreters, making sign language interpreting one of the fastest growing fields. An estimated 3,000 Deaf people and more than 6,000 American Sign Language users live, work and attend school in Frederick County, home to the Maryland School for the Deaf (MSD). Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., is the only four-year liberal arts university in the country serving solely the Deaf and hard-of hearing students. These Deaf communities offer ASL students many opportunities to work within the ASL culture.

Human service workers, allied health professionals, and educators who learn to communicate through American Sign Language provide their workplace with an important and urgently needed service to the Deaf and hard of hearing members of our community.
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences 
 
Two courses selected from different disciplines (GenEd course list) 6
Arts & Humanities
 
Three GenEd courses, one selected from each area: Arts, Humanities, and Communications 9
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement 1
Area of Concentration
 
CMSP 101–Introduction to Communication Studies 3
CMSP 103–Speech Fundamentals  3
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication (satisfies cultural competence requirement)  3
CMSP 201–Foundations of Communication Theory 3
Electives 16
Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS)
before selecting their electives. Depending on the transfer institution,
recommended electives may include: CMSP107, electives in the Social Sciences,
Digital Media, English or World Language disciplines.

 
Total 60
Prepares students working in the accounting field for career advancement opportunities. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of accounting principles and procedures and apply them to business situations. Students will also use application software to solve business and accounting problems. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in the following courses: ACCT 100, ACCT 101, ACCT 201, ACCT 202, ACCT 233 and ACCT 111.


Gainful Employment Information
 
Course  Credits

Departmental Requirements 


 
ACCT 100–Business Accounting 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II 3
ACCT 111–Computerized Accounting 3
ACCT 201–Intermediate Accounting I 4
ACCT 202–Intermediate of Accounting II 4
ACCT 203–Managerial Cost Accounting 3
ACCT 233–Applied Accounting 3
ACCT 117–Payroll Accounting  or
ACCT 205–Federal Income Tax Accounting  or
ACCT 216–Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting 
3
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
BU 273–Business Communications 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
CIS 111E–Spreadsheets 3
Total 41

 

 
Secondary Education

Students can begin preparation for a range of secondary teaching careers. Before transferring, future secondary teachers are advised to take ED 102 (Schools and Society), achieve a minimum of a 2.75 cumulative GPA and have acceptable scores on one of the following state-approved standardized tests: SAT, ACT, GRE or PRAXIS I: Pre-Professional Skills Test. Course requirements vary widely by transfer school and teaching area. Therefore, students are strongly encouraged to consult the Education Department at their transfer institution as early as possible in order to plan their coursework at FCC.
Besides honing your academic skills through active learning, some other benefits of participating in the Honors College are:
  • use of the Honors Lounge (H-247);
  • eligibility for honors internships and scholarships; and
  • opportunities to earn student recognitions for excellence (Anne Slater Award for Honors Excellence; MCHC Portz Award for Outstanding Honors Student, All-USA Academic Team).


Transfer and scholarship benefits include:
  • enhanced resume when applying for selective admission program at four-year colleges as well as scholarships;
  • articulation agreement with the honors program at McDaniel College, which includes admission and tuition benefits; and
  • articulation agreement with the honors program at Hood College, which includes admission and tuition benefits; and
  • articulation agreement with the honors program at Towson University, which includes admission and tuition benefits. 

Track 2 provides a broad education in emergency management and focuses on preparedness and skills needed to organize and lead emergency management operations. The program offers regional students the option to earn a degree in a hybrid format - a combination of online and on-campus courses.

Individuals interested in Track 2 are strongly encouraged to first contact the Emergency Management Academic Program Manager, prior to enrolling and prior to each semester, to facilitate the process of carefully selecting and sequencing courses based on interests and educational requirements.


  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://www.acaff.usmh.usmd.edu/artweb/index.html
Course Credits
English
 
EN101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
Social Science Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts & Humanities & Communications Elective (GenEd course list)* 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Science Elective (GenEd course list) 3/4
Interdisciplinary & Emerging Issues
 
Wellness Elective (GenEd course list) 3
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Elective (Wellness elective satisfies this requirement)  
Departmental Requirements 
 
ID 225–Disaster, Crisis, and Emergency Management 3
EM 102–Emergency Management Planning 3
EM 104–Disaster Response and Recovery 3
EM 106–Mitigation and Hazard Management 3
EM 110–Federal Emergency Management 3
EM 120–Introduction to Homeland Security 3
EM 130–Integrated Emergency Management 3
EM 201–Research and Technology in Emergency Management 3
EM 203–Social Impacts of Disaster 3
EM 205–Emergency Management Leadership 3
EM 210–Emergency Management Capstone 3
Electives
 
Elective Course 6
Total 60

What business degree programs does FCC offer?

  • Two Business programs are offered:  Business Administration, and Business Management.  In addition there are several shorter certificates.

Why should a student major in business?

  • The business field is dynamic, global, and constantly changing. Whether you want to start your own business or work for another business in areas like marketing, management, financial services, healthcare, human resources, business consulting, logistics, or project management, you will need education in business. 

What is an AA degree in Business Administration - Transfer?

  • This program is designed to prepare students to transfer to and major in business at a four-year college or university.  It articulates completely with most Maryland colleges.  Two years (approximately 60 college credits) at FCC provide the qualifications to be a business major at another school where a further specialization can be in finance, accounting, marketing, human resource management or other areas of interest.  By getting an A.A. degree at FCC, you earn about half the credits you need to get a bachelor’s degree, and save money as well.  About 80% of our business majors choose this option, due to the increased educational requirements for most professional level jobs in business.

What is an AAS degree in Business Management - Career?

  • If a student is interested in becoming an entrepreneur or in advancing to a higher level in a current position, business management offers courses to make this happen.  Flexible course options help the student tailor their program to specific needs.  The program is very flexible and many courses will transfer to other colleges if a four-year college becomes an option.

Are there specific differences between these two degrees?

  • The biggest difference is that the Transfer degree requires more general education courses and fewer technical courses, which makes this degree easier to transfer to four year colleges. The Career degree requires fewer general education courses and more technical courses since it is focused on immediate employment or advancement. Both degrees require approximately 60 college credits.

What purpose is served by certificates?

  • Certificates are a stepping stone allowing a student to take technical business courses and receive recognition for those accomplishments, while still allowing students to use these courses to complete a degree over time. 

Who teaches FCC’s business courses?

  • Our full time and adjunct faculty typically have a master’s degree (or higher) in their field of study, and almost all have significant actual real world experience in business.  In the classroom they integrate real world experience, hands on activities, and textbook theory.

Where can current information be obtained about these programs?

  • The program manager for business studies can help students decide if a business career is realistic for them.  One way to get started is to enroll in Introduction to Business (BU103),  an overview course required for all business students,  exposing them to many facets of business, including management, marketing, entrepreneurship, planning, human resources, operations, and finance.
Provides students with a foundation in the principles and practices of the surgical technologist’s roles during the phases of surgery. The foundations of practice are applied through extensive preceptored clinical experience. CAAHEP accreditation entitles program graduates to apply to sit for the national certifying examination in surgical technology. Enrollment is limited (20 students in each of two cohorts.)

Gainful Employment Information
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology and 4
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology  4
CMSP 103–Speech Fundamentals  or
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication  or
CMSP 107–Career Communications (preferred)
3
MDA 108–Basics of Medical Terminology  or
MDA 109–Medical Terminology
1/3
ST 120–Surgery Essentials 3
ST 100–Fundamentals of Surgical Technology I 6
ST 101–Introduction to Surgical Technology  6
ST 105–Clinical Practicum 5
ST 200–Fundamentals of Surgical Technology II 12
Total 44/46

Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.
 

Prepares students to work in child care centers, Head Start programs, nursery schools, or for self employment as family child care providers or nannies by offering specialized courses in early childhood. It also provides core early childhood courses to professionals who are currently working in the early childhood field. Courses fulfill the educational requirements for senior staff, group leader, director of a small center and also meet the Maryland child care credential and state requirements. 
A grade of “C” or better must be earned in all ED and ECD courses.

Gainful Employment Information


 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
ECD 101-Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3
ECD 104-Activities I for Children  3
ECD 106-Infant/Toddler Development & Care 3
ECD 107-Health, Safety and Nutrition 3
ECD 108-Activities for the School Age Child  3
ECD 210-Directed Practicum in Early Childhood  or
INTR 103-Internship
3
ECD 212-Administration of Child Development Centers 3
ECD 213-Understanding & Guiding the Young Child’s Behavior 3
ECD 230-Language & Literacy Development in Early Childhood  3
ED 100-Child Development & Behavior  3
ED 203-Introduction to Special Education 3
Total 33
Students will be able to:
  1. Prepare a plan that addresses organizational needs.
  2. Identify problem requirements that demonstrate understanding of user and technical needs.
  3. Explain solutions that satisfy problem requirements.
  4. Analyze alternative solutions to determine the optimal result.
  5. Design problem solution that solves the requirements.
  6. Product documentation that describes solution implementation.
  7. Integrate hardware, software and security models that facilitate project outcomes.
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://artsys.usmd.edu/
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
Mathematics Elective  (GenEd course list) (MA 206 recommended) 3/4
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
SO 101–Introduction to Sociology 3
Arts & Humanities
 
Arts Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Humanities Elective (GenEd course list) 3
Communications Elective (GenEd course list) (CMSP 103 or CMSP 105 recommended) 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
Two courses, one of which must be a lab science (GenEd course list) 7/8
General Education Elective  (Select from GenEd course list) 3
PE/Health Requirement  1
Departmental  Requirements 
 
SO 102–Social Problems 3
HS 102–Human Relations (fulfils cultural competence requirement) 3
HS 103–Introduction to Social Work and the Human Services 4
ED/PS 208–Human Growth and Development 3
Other Requirements (Choose one of the following tracks) 15
Total 60


Addictions Track

 
Area of Concentration (15 credits)  
PS 104–Issues of Drug/Alcohol Use 3
HS 203–Introduction to Counseling & Interviewing 3
HS 204–Ethics & Practice Issues in Human Services 1
HS 205–Fundamentals of Addiction 3
PS 206–Abnormal Psychology 3
INTR 102–Internship 2
Total 15


Social Work Transfer Track

 
Area of Concentration (15 credits)  
EC 201–Principles of Economics 3
AN 101–Introduction to Anthropology 3
PS 204–Psychology of Adolescence or  
PS 206–Abnormal Psychology 3
Electives**  6
Total 15

*  It is recommended that a science course in human biology be taken for one of the science requirements: BI 107 (lab science) or BI 117 (non-lab science).
**  See your advisor in order to match the elective credits to your specific transfer institution.

Transfer Note:
FCC has transfer agreements with the following institutions for students
graduating with an A.A. in Human Services and who are looking for transfer
opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office
at 301.846.2471.
• Stevenson University–B.S. Human Services
• University of Maryland University College – B.S. Gerontology and Aging Services
 
The ever-growing population of our state requires increasing numbers of law enforcement officials who are skilled at communicating, problem-solving, conflict resolution, and cultural awareness. The key to preparing and maintaining this type of professional law enforcement official is education.

Frederick Community College is a learning college that prepares law enforcement officials to meet the challenges of a diverse, global society through quality, accessible, innovative, lifelong learning.  A degree in police science prepares law enforcement officers for leadership roles and opportunities for advancement.

The Police Science program at FCC consists of two tracks: 
  • the On-Campus Police Science degree program for sworn law enforcement officials,  and
  • the Maryland State Police-contract Police Science degree program for MSP trooper candidates.

The On-Campus  Police Science associate degree program is available to sworn, currently employed police officers who hold a current Certification and Training Standards Compliance Card issued by the Maryland Police Training Commission (MPTC), and who are graduates of a Maryland police academy certified by the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commissions (MPCTC).  

Law enforcement officers who have graduated from a Maryland police academy can be awarded 29 credits for coursework taken during their academy training. Officers can complete the associate degree requirements either online or in a face-to-face classroom format by taking 31 additional credits (22 credits of general education courses and nine additional credits in criminal justice courses).

Officers must take a minimum of 15 credits at FCC to receive the associate degree from FCC. If an officer/student has credits from another institution, those credits can be transferred to FCC, provided the credits are accepted by FCC’s registrar.

The MSP-contract Police Science associate degree program is open to any trooper candidate employed by the Maryland Department of State Police and enrolled in the MSP Academy.  This program integrates general education coursework with the major components of the criminal justice process learned while the trooper candidate is attending the academy.

A specialized instructional program has been created for the MSP in which a trooper candidate completes one non-credit Algebra course; 19 general education credits; and 41 criminal justice credits during their Academy training in accordance with the guidelines of the Maryland Police & Corrections Training Commissions.  FCC instructors teach the candidates the required general education coursework in a face-to-face classroom format in the evenings during the Academy and for four weeks after graduation.
Transfer certificate option designed for students seeking early entry to a computer science bachelor’s program or for students with an undergraduate degree seeking to enter a graduate program that requires preparation in computer science and mathematics.

 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
MA 210–Calculus I 4
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
CIS 201–Computer Science I 4
CIS 202–Computer Science II 4
Total 15
Certificate (Career)
Prepares students to develop interactive computer games on the Internet, mobile computers, and personal computers. This certificate targets students who wish to obtain the skills necessary to develop computer games using programming language, such as Java, C++, C#, and Python.

 
Course  Credits
Requirements 
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
CIS 226–Game Scripting 3
CIS 227–Game Programming 4
CIS 228–Game Simulation & Game Development 4
CIS 208–C++ Programming OR
CIS 225C-Mobile app Development

3
   
Total 17
CyberTech at FCC is a new, grant-funded IT certificate program with no tuition cost for students. This 2-semester, cohort-based program is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills to sit for professional certification exams, including:
 
  • CompTIA A+
  • CompTIA Network+
  • CompTIA Security+
  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
  • CSX (Cybersecurity NEXUS) Cybersecurity Fundamentals

cybertech

The CyberTech program features 7 classes for a total of 21 credits with no tuition cost. Upon completion of the CyberTech program, students will receive an Information Security and Assurance certificate and fulfill more than a third of the requirements for a Cybersecurity degree. A program fee of $900 is required for all accepted CyberTech students.  


Space in this program is limited. For more information about CyberTech or to apply for the program, contact Dr. Andy Yao by email or 301.846.2410.

Gainful Employment Information
 

CyberTech Program Requirements

First Semester Second Semester
CIS 106 Object Design & Programming CIS 180 Network Fundamentals
CIS 179 Cybersecurity Fundamentals CIS 170 Security Fundamentals
CIS 111M PC Operating System CIS 219 Ethical Hacking & Systems Defense
CIS 212 PC Repairs & Diagnostics  
 










This program is funded by U.S. Department of Labor. This program was created by FCC and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The U.S. Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.The tuition-free program is funded by a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration.
CyberTech at FCC is a new, grant-funded IT certificate program with no tuition cost for students. This 2-semester, cohort-based program is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills to sit for professional certification exams, including:
 
  • CompTIA A+
  • CompTIA Network+
  • CompTIA Security+
  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
  • CSX (Cybersecurity NEXUS) Cybersecurity Fundamentals

cybertech

The CyberTech program features 7 classes for a total of 21 credits with no tuition cost. Upon completion of the CyberTech program, students will receive an Information Security and Assurance certificate and fulfill more than a third of the requirements for a Cybersecurity degree. A program fee of $900 is required for all accepted CyberTech students.  


Space in this program is limited. For more information about CyberTech or to apply for the program, contact Dr. Andy Yao by email or 301.846.2410.

Gainful Employment Information
 

CyberTech Program Requirements

First Semester Second Semester
CIS 106 Object Design & Programming CIS 180 Network Fundamentals
CIS 179 Cybersecurity Fundamentals CIS 170 Security Fundamentals
CIS 111M PC Operating System CIS 219 Ethical Hacking & Systems Defense
CIS 212 PC Repairs & Diagnostics  
 










This program is funded by U.S. Department of Labor. This program was created by FCC and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The U.S. Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.The tuition-free program is funded by a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration.
The Network Engineer Certificate prepares students with the knowledge and skills required to implement and maintain a defined network. Graduates will be able to configure, maintain, and troubleshoot network devices using network tools as well as analyze network traffic to make solution recommendations. This certificate also prepares graduates for Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) professional certification.
 
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements  
CIS 106 Object Design & Programming             3
CIS 190 Cisco 1 Networking Fundamentals                                          3
CIS 191 Cisco 2 Router Technologies               3
CIS 192 Cisco 3 Switching Technologies           3
CIS 193 Cisco 4 WAN Technologies                 3
Complete one of the following courses:  
CIS 170 Security Fundamentals  
CIS 210 Data Communications & Networking  
CIS 224 Wireless Communications                   3
  18
This program is designed to enhance qualifications for entry into the Fire or emergency services areas, for preparation for entry-level hiring examinations (reading, writing, and basic mathematics), and for current firefighters and EMS personnel/volunteers wishing to complete a degree in Fire Service Administration. Upon successful completion of this program, general education courses of study will enable the graduate to:
  • Demonstrate college-level communication skills.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking
  • Demonstrate the capacity for systems thinking about ways in which individuals, groups, institutions, and societies interrelate. (Social Sciences)
  • Demonstrate quantitative problem solving (Math)
  • Apply scientific reasoning (Science)
  • Demonstrate technological competence
  • Interpret and apply academic, professional and civic ethics
  • Make informed, critical responses to the visual, performing and literary arts and to the human values expressed in all art forms.
  • Evaluate personal wellness to make critically informed lifestyle choices reflecting an understanding of wellness.
  • Demonstrate cultural competence.
 
In addition, the application of general education courses will enhance the specific skills acquired through the Fire Service Administration program. The graduate will be able to:
  • Demonstrate proficiency in applying knowledge and skills pertaining to firefighting, principles of fire behavior, fire protection systems, and fire and emergency services policy and operational procedures.
  • Incorporate the values and behaviors of an academically trained professional, and identify the various parameters of the career.
  • Evaluate case scenarios using mastery of firefighting and EMS concepts.
  • Apply principles, practices, and methods of the Fire and Rescue system to affect successful resolutions to potentially and commonly-encountered situations.
  • Demonstrate appropriate methods of assessment and leadership skills to elicit patient information or conduct scene analyses and prepare applicable reports, documents, reviews, etc.
Provides the core skills needed to function in and prepare students for entry into the growing audio production profession. Audio production requires creative problem-solving rooted in a strong conceptual and practical foundation. In hands-on classes, students explore the concepts, tools, and techniques of the audio industry using hardware and software they will encounter in the workplace.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
MU 103–Fundamentals of Music  3
MU 106–Aural and Keyboard Skills *  1
BU 109–Entrepreneurship and Small Business Enterprise  3
MU 130–Foundations of Audio Technology  3
MU 135–Audio Recording Techniques  3
MU 145–Publishing, Licensing, and Copyrighting  3
MU 230–Studio Recording Techniques  3
MU 235–Advanced Audio Production 3
MU 240–MIDI Music Production Techniques 3
INTR 102–Internship  2
Total 27


​* MU103 may be taken concurrently with MU106 with the permission of the program manager.
 
Prepares students as entry-level CT technologists who are responsible for operating sophisticated equipment, performing venipuncture, and monitoring patient’s radiation dose. Computed Tomography Technologist (CT) uses x-rays and a computer to acquire a set of data from multiple angles around the patients body and produce high-resolution cross-sectional images, known as tomographic slices. Innovations, including spiral/helical and multi-slice CT, mean that CT is a rapid technique with many applications. Students pursuing a post-primary pathway certification in CT must hold primary pathway registration with the ARRT (or in some cases, NMTCB) in an appropriate discipline and document completion of specific clinical experience requirements or be currently enrolled in the Nuclear Medicine Technology program.

 
Course Credits
Departmental Courses
 
NM 220–CT Principles & Instrumentation 3
NM 222–Cross-sectional Anatomy 3
NM 224–CT Protocols & Applications 3
NM 226–Clinical Practicum 3
Total 12
Prepares students for work as a medical practice manager.
Students must receive a “C” or better in all MDA courses.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
BU 227–Principles of Management 3
BU 273–Business Communication 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
MDA 109–Medical Terminology 3
MDA 112–Medical Administrative Office Applications 3
MDA 216–Introduction to Medical Office Coding 3
MDA 218–Health Insurance Billing and Reimbursement 3
MDA 220–Introduction to Electronic Health Records 3
Total 27
A.A.S., Cybersecurity Student Learning Outcomes
(This degree was approved by MHEC on 5/26/2015.)
 
  1. Knowledge of disaster recovery and continuity of operations plans.
  2. Knowledge of systems administration concepts and operations.
  3. Knowledge of the operations and processes for diagnosing system problems.
  4. Knowledge of the maintenance needed to keep equipment functioning properly.
  5. Knowledge of physical computer components and architectures, and their functions.
  6. Knowledge of network security architecture concepts, including topology, protocols, components, and principles.
  7. Skills in conducting research for troubleshooting client-level-problems.
  8. Skills in identifying possible causes of degradation of system performance or availability and initiating actions needed to mitigate this degradation.
  9. Skills in testing and configuring network workstations and peripherals.
  10. Skills in using the appropriate tools for repairing software, hardware, and peripheral equipment of a system.
  11. Skills in identifying the risks and threats to an organization’s data and providing a structured way of addressing how to safeguard these critical electronic assets.
  12. Skills in a systems approach to critical thinking.
Certificate (Career)
Introduces students to the current animation and modeling software, such as Blender, Autodesk 3ds Max, and Autodesk Maya. This certificate covers animation production, computer graphics, interactive 3D foundations, and 3D modeling & animation. Students will learn the skills necessary to work as a Digital Graphic Designer, Multimedia Designer, Digital Animator, or Character Rigger

 
Course  Credits
Requirements 
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design & Programming 3
CIS 175–Game Theory and Design 3
CIS 176–Game Creation 3
CIS 177–Interactive 3D Technology 3
CIS 178– 3D Modeling & Animation 3
Complete one of the following courses:
CAD 101 Introduction to AutoCAD I
CMM 111 Communications Graphics I
CIS 101 Information Systems & Technology
CIS 140 Java Programming
CIS 208 C++ Programming
CIS 226 Game Scripting






3
   
Total 18
This certificate is designed to prepare graduates to work as healthcare information technology technicians in a healthcare setting and to perform tasks, such as maintaining the system that supports electronic health records (EHR), improving EHR software usability, and designing/implementing policies to protect healthcare data. It provides students with specialized knowledge and skills on healthcare relevant software and computer proficiency. The curriculum includes information technology, healthcare systems, and medical business operations. This certificate covers the objectives required by CompTIA A+ and CompTIA Healthcare IT Technician.

 
Department Requirements  
Course Credits
CIS 101 - Information Systems and Technology OR
CIS 106 - Object Design and Programming
3
CIS 111M - PC Operating Systems 3
CIS 212 - PC Repairs & Diagnostics 3
CIS 173 - Healthcare Information Technology 3
MDA 109 - Medical Terminology 3
MDA 112 - Medical/Administrative Office Applications 3
MDA 220 - Electronic Health Records 3
  21 
Effective Date Summer 2016

Prepares students with the essential knowledge on communications-based networks and systems in order to become Radio Frequency (RF) technicians whose primary duties include the installation, maintenance upgrade, and testing of RF systems, such as wireless Internet access points, cellular antennas, and satellite systems. Provides the foundation for familiarity with electronics, computing, networking, and wireless technologies. This LOR prepares students for BICSI (Building Industry Consulting Service International) Technician certification and National Association of Radio and Telecommunications Engineers (NARTE) Wireless System Installers certification.



 
Sub/Cat # Course Title Credit
CIS 111K Practical Structured Cabling 3
CIS 116F Computer Fundamentals 1
CIS 210 Data Communications and Networking 3
CIS 224 Wireless Communications 3
  Total 10
 

 
   
SLO # Student Learning Outcome
SLO #1 Demonstrate competence discovering, applying, and thinking critically about basic business, accounting, and computing concepts and trends. 
SLO #2 Identify and analyze ethical issues in business. 
SLO #3 Communicate effectively using multiple communication methods (oral, written, graphic, and electronic). 
SLO #4 Demonstrate the ability to work effectively and cooperatively as part of a team/work group. 
1. What technology degrees, certificates, and letters of recognition are available?
The following degree, certificate, and Letter of Recognition options are available:

Degrees
  • Computer Science (Transfer Program)
  • Information Technology Option I: Information Technology Specialist
  • Information Technology Option II: Network Engineer
  • Information Systems Management (Transfer Program)

Certificates
  • Computer Science Studies
  • Software Specialist
  • Computer Studies
  • Personal Computer Support Specialist
  • Information Security and Assurance

Letters of Recognition
  • Database Administration

2. What can I do with a Computer Science degree?
This program can lead to a job as a Programmer, Software Developer, Applications Developer, or Development Engineer. This program is designed as a transfer program allowing students to transfer their credits to a four-year institution.

3. What can I do with an Information Systems Management degree?
This program can lead to a job as a System Analyst, Business or QA Analyst, IS Manager, IT Relationship Manger, or IT Service Manager.  This program is designed as a transfer program allowing students to transfer their credits to a four-year institution.

4. What can I do with an Information Technology Option I degree?
This program can lead to a job as a PC Repair Specialist, Database Administrator, Data Modeler, Network Manager, Web Developer, Help Desk Manager, or IT Analyst.

5. What can I do with an Information Technology Option II degree?
This program can lead to a job as a Network Engineer or a Network Administrator. The Cisco track helps prepares students to sit for the CCENT and CCNA certification exams.

6. Which program is best for me?
That is a question only you can answer.  If you love working with your hands and fixing things, perhaps you would like the Information Technology Option I program.  If you like problem solving and want to transfer to a four-year college, the Computer Science program may be an option.  You can speak to the program manager who can help you decide which option is best for you.

7. Can I receive credit for my A+, Net+, Security+, or CCNA certifications?
If you hold a current CompTIA A+, Net+, Security+, or CCNA certification, you can receive credit for the courses that would typically lead to sitting for the certification.

8. When are the courses offered?
The courses for each program are offered in the following formats:
  • Day classes
  • Night classes
  • Hybrid  (half of the course is conducted online, and the other half is conducted in a traditional classroom setting)
  • Online
  • 7-week
  • 15-week
All law enforcement officials interested in this degree program must first contact the program manager to have the required credentials reviewed prior to enrolling and placement testing.  If the law enforcement official has the required credentials, he or she will be awarded 29 articulated credits in Criminal Justice courses which are applied toward the degree requirements.  These courses include:

Course Credits
CJ 106–Police-Community Relations 3
CJ 204–Police Operational Services 3
CJ 212–Criminalistics 4
CJ 220–Criminal Evidence and Procedures 3
CJ 221–Police Defense Tactics 5
CJ 222–Police Arsenal and Procedures 5
CJ 223–Emergency Vehicle Operations Course 3
CJ 224–Awareness Training for Weapons of Mass Destruction; or  
CJ 214–The Correctional Process 3
Total 29
Career

Prepares those seeking new careers in the field of addictions and for those who wish to advance in their present career by adding professional education in addictions to their credentials.

Gainful Employment Information
 
 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
PS 104–Issues of Drug/Alcohol Abuse 3
ED/PS 208–Human Growth and Development 3
HS 203–Introduction to Counseling and Interviewing 3
PS 206–Abnormal Psychology 3
HS 205–Fundamentals of Addiction 3
HS 206–Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs 3
HS 204–Ethics and Practice Issues in the Human Services 1
INTR 102 Internship 2
Total 24
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Information Technology: Option I and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
  • University of Maryland University College – B.S. Computer Science and
  • University of Maryland University College – B.S. Cybersecurity.
By the completion of this program, students will be able to:
  1. Prepare a networking plan and identify problem requirements that demonstrate understanding of administrative and technical needs.
  2. Analyze alternative networking solutions to determine the optimal result.
  3. Design and document networking solution that solves the requirements.
  4. Integrate hardware, software, networking technologies and security models that facilitate project outcomes.
  5. Maintain the hardware, software, networking technologies and security implementation of an existing network.
Prepares students to enter the workforce in early childhood development. The certificate targets four courses that are required to meet the educational requirements of the Maryland State Department of Education Office of Child Care. The certificate highlights the following positions: child care teacher of preschools, infant/toddler classrooms, and school age (before and after school programs). Students must complete each course with a “C” or better to receive this certificate.
 
 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
ECD 104–Activities I for Children 3
ECD 106–Infant/Toddler Development & Care 3
ECD 108–Activities for the School Age Child 3
ED 100–Child Development & Behavior 3
Total 12
Admissions Policy & Procedure

Enrollment in the clinical portion of the program is limited to 20 students for each of two cohorts - fall admission and spring admission. To be considered, you must: 
 
  1. Complete and submit a FCC application for admission and submit proof of residency if required.

  2. Complete an application for the ST program.

    All applications will be reviewed and seats will be offered according to the point scale, and date of application. Although applications will be reviewed at any time, first consideration is given to students who submit an application by the first consideration dates which are: October 15 for spring admission, and April 15 for fall admission. Please refer to the online application.

  3. Minimum skill levels in the areas of reading, writing, math, and allied health science are necessary to enroll in pre-requisite coursework for the ST program.

  4. The minimum pre-requisites are:  BI 103, BI 104, medical terminology, and a communication course. 

  5. Students must achieve a “C” or higher in “all” pre-requisite courses and any other course a student plans to apply toward the ST program requirements. The pre-requisite courses are: BI 103, BI 104, medical terminology, and a communications course.

  6. A point system is used to determine selection to the program. Points will be assigned only to those students who have returned the Application for Admission to the Surgical Technology Class.

  7. When there are more qualified applicants than there are seats in the program, those with the highest points will be offered seats first. Other qualified applicants will be offered seats as they become available.

  8. Participate in a job shadowing experience.  Follow a surgical technology in the OR for a day and evaluate if the career is for you.  Those with documented job shadowing receive points on the admission point scale.

  9. Mark your calendar for the mandatory orientation session conducted for each new class.  Refer to the ST Application.

  10. Conviction of a felony or misdemeanor may prohibit placement into a clinical site, applying for a professional license, or acquiring employment as a healthcare professional.  Prior to applying for consideration in a healthcare program which requires clinical placement for program completion, please discuss any questions you may have with the program director or manager. Once admitted into the program, students are required to pay for and obtain criminal background checks and drug screening before starting clinical coursework; and random drug screening may occur at any time during clinical experiences.

  11. Students will submit a completed Confidential Student Health Profile prior to beginning the program. Validation of immunity is required via laboratory documentation ( bloodwork). Prospective ST students must visit their physician to obtain an order for bloodwork approximately 9 months before the program begins. History of diseases such as MMR or Varicella is no longer acceptable. Hepatitis B titers are required. Refer to the here for all specific requirements.

Point Scale for Admission into the ST Program*
Effective January 2016
*per catalog addendum 15-16 v2 6-30-15
 

Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.

The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation.
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation.
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation. For more information, visit the Career & Transfer Center, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, 301.846.2594.

Your academic opportunities begin with Honors courses, which are designated with an “H” in the schedule. Because honors courses have the same core learning outcomes and content requirements as regular courses they are easily transferable. Honors courses are smaller (limit 15) and often operate as seminars with heavy class discussion. Some courses are linked so the same cohort of students is together in two classes that share blocks of time. All honors courses stress excellence in reading, writing, and research. 


With permission of the instructor and the honors coordinator, Honors Contracts can be arranged for courses not in the schedule (e.g., MA 210 Calculus I). Contact the honors coordinator to request an Honors Contract application.


Students can conduct scholarly research or produce creative works through Honors Independent Study projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students share their work with the campus community at the Honors Forum and are encouraged to present at student conferences. Each year one student may be nominated to compete for the Portz Award for Outstanding Honors Student at Two-Year Colleges, which is sponsored by the Maryland Collegiate Honors Council.



Prepares students for immediate employment in the accounting field in a support position. Students will learn how to apply accounting concepts in a computerized environment to assist the business with their record keeping requirements. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in the following courses: ACCT 100, ACCT 101, ACCT 111.


Gainful Employment Information
 
Course  Credits

Departmental Requirements


 
ACCT 100–Business Accounting 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II 3
ACCT 111–Computerized Accounting 3
ACCT 117–Payroll Accounting  or
ACCT 205–Federal Income Tax Accounting  or
ACCT 216–Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting
3
BU 273–Business Communications 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
CIS 111E–Spreadsheets 3
Total 24
Students will be able to:
  1. Modify verbal and nonverbal communication appropriately given the purpose and the context of the communication.
  2. Plan, prepare, and deliver a well-organized, logical oral presentation that demonstrates critical thinking skills.
  3. Use appropriate presentation techniques (e.g. maintain eye contact, modulate voice, avoid distracting mannerisms, etc.)
  4. Employ appropriate discussion, negotiation, conflict resolution, and cooperation skills to work with people from a variety of experiences and backgrounds in the community and the workplace.
  5. Apply relevant criteria and standards when evaluating information, claims and arguments.
  6. Use appropriate reasoning to evaluate problems, make decisions, and formulate solutions.
  7. Demonstrate appropriate methods of integrating and documenting outside sources.
  8. Demonstrate effective listening behaviors in both interpersonal and group situations.
Students will be able to:
  1. To recognize the elements of design and technique of a work of art.
  2. To analyze and critique works of art within their cultural and historical context.
  3. To produce works of art in a variety of media.
  4. To demonstrate and appreciate the creative process through research, development and execution.
Provides an introductory level of training to prepare individuals to work as process operators in biological products manufacturing. Students will be introduced to concepts related to bioprocessing technology, and will learn basic laboratory skills, workplace safety and general regulations that apply to the bioprocessing industry.

 
Course Credits

Departmental Requirements 


 
BPM 102–Bioprocessing Environment 3
BPM 103–Laboratory Techniques I 1
BPM 110–Bioprocessing Measurements 4
Total 8
Provides students with the knowledge and skills required for an entry level position in construction management.

Gainful Employment Information

 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CON 101–Introduction to Construction Management 3
CON 140–Architectural Blueprint Reading 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
CON 132–Materials and Methods of Construction I 3
CON 133–Materials and Methods of Construction II 3
CON/CIS  Take six credits from the following: 6
CIS 111E–Microcomputer Software Applications: Spreadsheets,
Any CON course not included above.
6
Total 21
Career
Offers students interested in broadcast and non-broadcast television production an opportunity for hands-on learning experiences. An overview of the mass communications field is followed by studio and lab courses in the television studio, editing labs, the computer graphics lab and photography lab. Instructional emphasis is on designing and producing high-quality, contemporary work that effectively solves communications problems. College-level writing is expected.

Gainful Employment Information
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
CMM 101–Introduction to Electronic Media  3
CMM 103–Introduction to Film  3
CMM 111–Communications Graphics I  3
CMM 132–Digital Photography I 3
CMM 152–Digital Studio Production  4
CMM 252–Digital Film Production 4
CMM 254–Principles of Film and Video Editing 4
CMM 256–Television Studio Directing & Operations  or
CMM 261–Digital Post Production
4
Total 28
 


Digital Media Design: Television Production Promo from FCC Digital Media Design TV on Vimeo.

Students will be able to:
  1. Understand the historical context of theatre and drama, including its relationship to contemporary society and culture.
  2. Demonstrate an introductory practical, working knowledge of how to produce a play on stage, including all related performance, script, design, and technical aspects.
  3. Critically differentiate and evaluate what they and other have created.
  4. Gain experience with individual and collaborative processes needed to produce and understand theatre.
The criminal justice field offers many exciting and rewarding career opportunities.  While people may associate criminal justice with traditional law enforcement jobs, such as local police forces, the field also offers career options in agencies that oversee parole and probation, corrections, and juvenile justice at the local, state and national levels. Each career path allows those to serve opportunities to have a direct and positive impact on individuals’ lives and on society as a whole.

FCC’s Criminal Justice program can help you identify the best path—police or detective work, governmental agency, parole or corrections—to allow you to utilize your skills and pursue your interests. 

Small classes of 15-30 students meet with criminal justice professionals—police officers, judges, lawyers and correctional officers— who bring real-world experience to the classroom. Students visit the local detention center and courts to talk directly with professionals in the field.

Criminal justice workers must possess the ability to:
  • think quickly in sometimes volatile situations,
  • solve problems with patience and creativity, 
  • communicate clearly and effectively both orally and in writing, and 
  • adapt to all types of situations.

In addition to developing these skills, students in FCC’s Criminal Justice program learn:
  • principles underlying technical skills and procedures involved in law enforcement,
  • technical skills and procedures, including rules of arrest and criminal law,
  • knowledge of the administration and operation of criminal justice organizations, and
  • insight into psychological and sociological origins of human behavior.
Students will be able to:
  • Apply the steps in the accounting cycle to record accounting transactions and adjustments, and create financial statements according to generally accepted accounting principles.
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of accounting principles and their application as they relate to financial statements for all businesses.
  • Apply managerial accounting concepts to solve business financial problems.
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of auditing principles, generally accepted auditing standards; and their application to the examination of financial statements.
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of federal tax law and principles as it applies to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.
  • Demonstrate basic business conceptual knowledge as required by the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy.
  • Demonstrate awareness of ethics as required by the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy.
Students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology through the successful completion of discipline specific courses.
  2. Explore and examine critical thinking using the scientific approach to solve problems related to human behavior and mental processes through completion of a series of application exercises.
  3. Apply psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to everyday life through reflection papers.
  4. Develop insight into one’s own behavior and mental processes and apply effective strategies for self-management and self-improvements.
  5. Explore the elements of multiculturalism through learning about social constructs such as gender, SES, race, and ethnicity.
  6. Upon completion of other MBTI, students will emerge from the program of study with ideas on how to implement one’s knowledge of psychology, skills, and values in future occupational and educational pursuits.
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation. For more information, visit the Career & Transfer Center, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, 301.846.2594.
A paralegal may not practice law but works under the direction of a licensed attorney, performing similar duties, with the exception of dispensing legal advice.

Depending on the particular area of law, a paralegal’s responsibilities may include:
  • investigating and gathering facts,
  • performing book-based and computerized legal research,
  • preparing a variety of legal documents,
  • utilizing manual or computerized timekeeping and docketing systems,
  • conducting client interviews,
  • preparing witnesses and evidence for presentation at legal proceedings, and
  • representing clients at administrative hearings.

Paralegals need:
  • excellent oral and written communication skills,
  • technical knowledge and computer application skills,
  • organization and time management skills, and
  • the ability to prioritize, work under pressure and meet deadlines.

FCC’s Paralegal program is nationally recognized by the American Association for Paralegal Education (www.aafpe.org) and offers a chapter of Lambda Epsilon Chi, the Paralegal Honor Society. Students are invited to join the Paralegal Student Association, a peer group which helps foster relationships between students and the legal community while encouraging students in their studies and career aspirations.
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.S. in Pre-Nursing and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
  • Stevenson University –B.S. Nursing
Admissions Policy & Procedure

To be considered for admission into the Respiratory Care program, a student must:
 
  1. Complete and submit a College application for admission and provide proof of residency.

  2. Submit a Respiratory Care application to the Department of Allied Health and Wellness by June 1.

  3. Complete all required prerequisite coursework prior to applying to the program.

  4. Achieve a “C” or higher in “all” prerequisite courses applied toward the RC program requirements. The prerequisite courses are: EN 101, PS 101, BI 103, BI 104, BI 120, CMSP 105, PE/Health Elective, and a general education Mathematics Elective.

  5. Complete Anatomy & Physiology I (BI 103) with a “C” or better prior to applying to the program.

  6. Be in good academic standing (no academic alert, no academic probation).

  7. Have a GPA of at least 2.0. 

  8. Have all official transcripts from other colleges/universities sent to the Welcome Center by June 1.

  9. Apply for admission to FCC.

  10. Meet with the allied health advisor.

    Points will be assigned only to those students who have returned the “Student Application for the Respiratory Care Clinical Class” and met the above criteria. The point value for non-clinical courses completed and residency are shown on the “Criteria for Admission to the Respiratory Care Program” sheet.

    The students with the highest point total will be accepted conditionally into the clinical portion of the program and will be informed of their status by June 30. Students with equal point totals will be ordered by GPA from highest to lowest (GPA calculated only from courses listed on “criteria for admissions”). If an accepted student declines their seat in the program, the next eligible student with the highest score is offered admission to the program.

  11. Must have at least 6 points (out of the 15 for Criteria for Admission to the Respiratory Care Program)

Criteria for Admission to the Respiratory Care Program

 
Course Points
EN101 1
PS101 1
BI103  
2 points if passed first time course is taken, 1 point if passed second time course is taken, 0 points if passed on three or more attempts 2
BI104  
2 points if passed first time course is taken, 1 point if passed second time course is taken, 0 points if passed on three or more attempts 2
BI120 2
Gen Ed Math 2
Gen Ed Communications 1
PE/Health Elective 1
GPA: 3.0 or higher 1
Job Shadow (observe a therapist) 1
*Residency – Frederick County, Carroll County or Howard County 1
TOTAL 15

*  Residents of Carroll and Howard Counties are awarded the same point for residency as Frederick County residents, as part of the Mid-Maryland Allied Healthcare Consortium Agreement.

Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.

The certificate program provides a broad education in emergency management and focuses on preparedness and the skills needed to organize and lead emergency management operations.
 
Through a unique partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), FCC utilizes FEMA Independent Study (IS) curriculum - consisting of self-paced online courses - to deliver this valuable program to FCC students. Students complete specific FEMA IS courses, follow a simple online process to convert the coursework to college credit and then enroll in 5-week online modules to receive the Emergency Management Certificate. Visit FEMA IS Conversion to learn more.
 
Individuals interested in earning an Emergency Management Certificate are strongly encouraged to first contact the Emergency Management Academic Program Manager, prior to enrolling and prior to each semester, to facilitate the process while carefully selecting and sequencing courses based on interests and educational requirements.

The FEMA IS credit conversion process takes place in three (3) environments.
  1. FEMA website: Take FEMA IS courses online at http://training.fema.gov/is/crslist.aspx
  2. EMI/Jacobs (www.em-study.com): online site where you go to convert FEMA IS courses to college credit.
  3. Frederick Community College (FCC): where FCC Modules are completed.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
EM Module 1A: Foundations of Emergency Management (5-week online class) 3
    ​FEM 113–Comprehensive Emergency Management (IS-1.a)
 
    ​FEM 131–Principles of Emergency Management (IS-230.d)
 
    ​FEM 151–National Incident Management System (NIMS) (IS-700.a, 702.a, and 703.a)
 
EM Module 2A: Emergency Management Coordination (5-week online class) 3
    ​FEM 215–Disaster Medical Coordination, Monitoring, and Surveillance (IS-930)
 
    ​​FEM 161–Emergency Operations Center (IS-775)
 
    ​​FEM 150–Incident Command System (IS-100.b and 200.b)
 
EM Module 3A: Leadership and Management (5-week online class) 3
    ​FEM 132–Introduction to Leadership and Influence (IS-240.b)
 
    ​​FEM 133–Decision Making & Problem Solving (IS-241.b)
 
    ​​FEM 134–Effective Communication (IS-242.b)
 
EM Module 4A: Planning and Response (5-week online class) 3
    ​FEM 140–Emergency Planning (IS-235.b)
 
    ​​FEM 159–National Response Framework (IS-800.b)
 
    ​​FEM 174–Disaster Response Operations (IS-26, 102.c, 293, and 634)
 
EM Module 5A: Emergency Management Mitigation (5-week online class) 3
    ​​FEM 157–Hazard Mitigation (IS-393.a)
 
    ​FEM 186–Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Workforce Basics (IS-319, 320, 321, 322 and 323)
 
    ​FEM 173–Continuity of Operations Planning (IS-546.a, 547.a, 548 and 550)
 
EM Module 6A: Recovery and Assessment (5-week online class) 3
    ​​FEM 201–National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF) Overview (IS-2900)
 
    ​​FEM 179–Emergency Management Recovery (IS-212.a, 395 and 559)
 
    ​FEM 103-National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF) Overview (IS 120.a and IS-130)
 
Other Requirements
 
FEM Electives (Select 8 credits from FEM courses not listed above) 8
Total 26

 
Career

Prepares students for a career in personal training, the training of different populations to improve their fitness levels. Certification is through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM).

Gainful Employment Information
 
Courses Credits
BI 103    Anatomy & Physiology (4)  or  
BI 107    Human Biology (4)   4
HE 110   Nutrition Basics 1
PE 108   Body Mechanics 1
PE 154   Fitness for Living 3
PE 237   Exercise Psychology 1
PE 241   Methods of Fitness and Conditioning 1
PE 247   Methods of Strength Training 1
PE 249   Fitness Assessment and Business Practices (only in fall)* 3
PE 250   Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
PE 252   Essentials of Personal Training (only in spring)* 4
INTR 102 Internship 2
Total 24
   
Other Recommended Courses:  
HE 102   Nutrition in a Changing World or  
HE 200   Principles and Applications of Nutrition 3
HE 115   Stress Management Techniques or 1
PE 198A Boot Camp 1
PE 190   Pilates 1
BU 109   Entrepreneurship & Small Business Enterprise 3

*PE 249 is only offered in the fall semester.
*PE 252 is only offered in the spring semester.
Students should do the internship in
the same semester as PE 252, or if not, then in the semester immediately following.
There are additional certification fees associated with PE252. See program
manager for details.

Gainful Employment
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
BLD 101–Introduction to Building Trades 3
BLD 141–Fundamentals of Structural Wiring 4
BLD 142–Residential Electric 3
BLD 145–Commercial Electric 3
BLD 146–Specialized Systems 3
Total 16

AAT Requirements

  • Admission to the four-year institution is a “two-step” process and is not guaranteed. Applications to both the institution and to the teacher education program may be required.
  • Due to space limitations at some four-year institutions and/or teacher education programs, students should apply as early as possible and consider alternatives. Students should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution to determine the specific admissions requirements and deadlines of the institution to which they wish to transfer. 
  • Upon admission to a Maryland public or independent four-year institution teacher education program, up to 64 semester hours, including the lower division teacher education program outcomes, will transfer without further review.
  • The AAT degree holder is considered to have satisfied the following lower division requirements for the education program.
    • 30 - 36 semester hours of general education requirements for public institutions.
    • The lower division outcomes for teacher education may be included in courses such as the foundations of education, human growth/child or adolescent development, educational psychology, introductory field experience, and introductory special education. In addition, some students may be required to complete up to two additional lower division teacher education courses. Check with your advisor at your college for specific requirements for your major
  • Students in Secondary Education AAT programs must complete specified content courses.

Upon Transfer

The student will be required to complete the remaining 10 - 16 semester hours of general education requirements of the public institution. Students planning to attend an independent institution should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution regarding the remaining general education requirements.

The student will also be required to complete the remaining teacher education program requirements, upper-division institutional requirements, and any other general institutional degree requirements. Students enrolling in a Secondary Education program will also be required to complete the remaining content area requirements.

Additional Information

  • Information regarding upper-division requirements may be obtained by contacting the appropriate four-year institution’s advisor, dean, director, or chair of education.
  • More information is available at the Maryland Higher Education Website (MHEC): www.mhec.state.md.us
Provides students with the basic knowledge and skills required to succeed in an entry-level position as an architectural CAD drafter, operator, or technician.
 
Gainful Employment Information
 
 
Course Credits

Departmental Requirements 


 
CAD 101–Introduction to AutoCAD I 3
CAD 102–Introduction to AutoCAD II 3
CAD 200–Introduction to Architectural Drawing and Design 3
CAD 201–Residential Architecture I 4
CAD 205–Civil Drafting I with CAD 3
CON 132–Methods and Materials of Construction I 3
CON 133–Methods and Materials of Construction II 3
   
Technical Elective Courses–choose one course from any of the areas below 3/4

Architecture/Construction Area


 
CAD 121–Introduction to Microstation (3)
 
CAD 130 Introduction to Revit (3)
 
CAD 202–Residential Architecture II (4)
 
CAD 204 Introduction to Inventor (3)
 
CON 101–Introduction to Construction Management (3)
 
CON 210 BIM and Construction Management (3)
 

Civil Area


 
CAD 207–Civil Drafting II with CAD (3)
 

Electrical Area (permission of program manager required for Electrical courses)


 
BLD 141–Electrical Theory & Fundamentals (4)
 
Total 25/26
Prepares students for entry level employment in careers requiring basic business and management skills.

Gainful Employment Information

 
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 102–Principles of Accounting II  3
EC 201–Principles of Economics (Macro) 3
EC 202–Principles of Economics (Micro) 3
EN 101–English Composition  or
BU 273–Business Communication
3
Any BU or ACCT course not taken above or Math Elective; Recommend BU 227 Principles of Management 3
Total 24
Designed to prepare students for entry-level cooking jobs in hotels, restaurants, supermarkets, country clubs, caterers, cafes and institutional kitchens. Basic hot and cold food preparation, production, presentation, and service skills are taught. Development of proper work habits, professionalism, and the practice of food safety and sanitation procedures are stressed.

Gainful Employment Information
 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
HOS 111–Culinary Fundamentals 1
HOS 112–Culinary I 3
HOS 113–Culinary II 3
HOS 114–Culinary Baking 3
HOS 121–Sanitation & Food Safety 2
HOS 123–Purchasing and Cost Control 3
INTR 103Internship or HOS Elective 3
Total
18
To earn the A.A.T., students must achieve a minimum of a 2.750 cumulative GPA and earn a “C” or better in all courses used to satisfy the A.A.T. requirements. Students must also provide the Registrar's Office with qualifying scores on one of the state-approved basic skills tests for future teachers. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor at their transfer institution as early as possible and should be aware that some colleges and universities may require higher GPAs and/or additional tests.
 

AAT Requirements

  • Admission to the four-year institution is a “two-step” process and is not guaranteed. Applications to both the institution and to the teacher education program may be required.
  • Due to space limitations at some four-year institutions and/or teacher education programs, students should apply as early as possible and consider alternatives. Students should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution to determine the specific admissions requirements and deadlines of the institution to which they wish to transfer. 
  • Upon admission to a Maryland public or independent four-year institution teacher education program, up to 64 semester hours, including the lower division teacher education program outcomes, will transfer without further review.
  • The AAT degree holder is considered to have satisfied the following lower division requirements for the education program.
    • 30 - 36 semester hours of general education requirements for public institutions.
    • The lower division outcomes for teacher education may be included in courses such as the foundations of education, human growth/child or adolescent development, educational psychology, introductory field experience, and introductory special education. In addition, some students may be required to complete up to two additional lower division teacher education courses. Check with your advisor at your college for specific requirements for your major.
  • Students in Secondary Education AAT programs must complete specified content courses.

Upon Transfer

The student will be required to complete the remaining 10 - 16 semester hours of general education requirements of the public institution. Students planning to attend an independent institution should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution regarding the remaining general education requirements.

The student will also be required to complete the remaining teacher education program requirements, upper-division institutional requirements, and any other general institutional degree requirements. Students enrolling in a Secondary Education program will also be required to complete the remaining content area requirements.


Additional Information
  • Information regarding upper-division requirements may be obtained by contacting the appropriate four-year institution’s advisor, dean, director, or chair of education.
  • More information is available at the Maryland Higher Education Website (MHEC): www.mhec.state.md.us
To earn the A.A.T., students must achieve a minimum of a 2.750 cumulative GPA and earn a “C” or better in all courses used to satisfy the A.A.T. requirements. Students must also provide the Registrar's Office with qualifying scores on one of the state-approved basic skills tests for future teachers. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor at their transfer institution as early as possible and should be aware that some colleges and universities may require higher GPAs and/or additional tests.
To earn the A.A.T., students must achieve a minimum of a 2.750 cumulative GPA and earn a “C” or better in all courses used to satisfy the A.A.T. requirements. Students must also provide the Registrar's Office with qualifying scores on one of the state-approved basic skills tests for future teachers. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor at their transfer institution as early as possible and should be aware that some colleges and universities may require higher GPAs and/or additional tests.

AAT Requirements

  • Admission to the four-year institution is a “two-step” process and is not guaranteed. Applications to both the institution and to the teacher education program may be required.
  • Due to space limitations at some four-year institutions and/or teacher education programs, students should apply as early as possible and consider alternatives. Students should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution to determine the specific admissions requirements and deadlines of the institution to which they wish to transfer. 
  • Upon admission to a Maryland public or independent four-year institution teacher education program, up to 64 semester hours, including the lower division teacher education program outcomes, will transfer without further review.
  • The AAT degree holder is considered to have satisfied the following lower division requirements for the education program.
    • 30 - 36 semester hours of general education requirements for public institutions.
    • The lower division outcomes for teacher education may be included in courses such as the foundations of education, human growth/child or adolescent development, educational psychology, introductory field experience, and introductory special education. In addition, some students may be required to complete up to two additional lower division teacher education courses. Check with your advisor at your college for specific requirements for your major.
  • Students in Secondary Education AAT programs must complete specified content courses.

Upon Transfer

The student will be required to complete the remaining 10 - 16 semester hours of general education requirements of the public institution. Students planning to attend an independent institution should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution regarding the remaining general education requirements.

The student will also be required to complete the remaining teacher education program requirements, upper-division institutional requirements, and any other general institutional degree requirements. Students enrolling in a Secondary Education program will also be required to complete the remaining content area requirements.

Additional Information

  • Information regarding upper-division requirements may be obtained by contacting the appropriate four-year institution’s advisor, dean, director, or chair of education.
  • More information is available at the Maryland Higher Education Website (MHEC): www.mhec.state.md.us

AAT Requirements

  • Admission to the four-year institution is a “two-step” process and is not guaranteed. Applications to both the institution and to the teacher education program may be required.
  • Due to space limitations at some four-year institutions and/or teacher education programs, students should apply as early as possible and consider alternatives. Students should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution to determine the specific admissions requirements and deadlines of the institution to which they wish to transfer. 
  • Upon admission to a Maryland public or independent four-year institution teacher education program, up to 64 semester hours, including the lower division teacher education program outcomes, will transfer without further review.
  • The AAT degree holder is considered to have satisfied the following lower division requirements for the education program.
    • 30 - 36 semester hours of general education requirements for public institutions.
    • The lower division outcomes for teacher education may be included in courses such as the foundations of education, human growth/child or adolescent development, educational psychology, introductory field experience, and introductory special education. In addition, some students may be required to complete up to two additional lower division teacher education courses. Check with your advisor at your college for specific requirements for your major.
• Students in Secondary Education AAT programs must complete specified content courses.

Upon Transfer

The student will be required to complete the remaining 10 - 16 semester hours of general education requirements of the public institution. Students planning to attend an independent institution should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution regarding the remaining general education requirements.

The student will also be required to complete the remaining teacher education program requirements, upper-division institutional requirements, and any other general institutional degree requirements. Students enrolling in a Secondary Education program will also be required to complete the remaining content area requirements.

Additional Information

  • Information regarding upper-division requirements may be obtained by contacting the appropriate four-year institution’s advisor, dean, director, or chair of education.
  • More information is available at the Maryland Higher Education Website (MHEC): www.mhec.state.md.us
Admissions Policy & Procedure

To be considered for admission into the Nuclear Medicine Technology program, a student must:

 
  1. Complete and submit a College application for admission and provide proof of residency.

  2. Submit a Nuclear Medicine Technology application to the Department of Allied Health and Wellness by the posted deadline April 1 for fall admission.

  3. Successfully complete the eight core courses within two attempts of each course (EN 101, BI 103, BI 104, CH 101, PY 101, MA 130, MA 206 and MDA 108) by August prior to the program start date.*

  4. Earn at least a “C” in all prerequisite coursework within two attempts of each course.** A minimum overall GPA of 2.00 is required for previous core prerequisite college work. Competitive GPAs for accepted applicants are typically much higher than the minimum requirements.

  5. Have all official transcripts from colleges/universities sent to the Welcome Center by the April 1st deadline.

  6. Document at least four hours of shadowing/observation in nuclear medicine technology, prior to or concurrent with application.*** Additional shadowing (40-50 hrs.) is recommended for applicants who have no prior health care work experience. This experience can be arranged by contacting a convenient institutional imaging or therapy department. Documentation must be submitted to the department of Allied Health and Wellness by April 1st.

  7. Submit a 1-2 page paper discussing your shadowing experience. All papers must be typed; double spaced, printed and stapled, and must include student name and FCC Student ID number. Papers not meeting these criteria will not be accepted or reviewed. Papers are due by April 1st . Please see rubric for grading guide.

    The selection process is based on a point system. The points will only be assigned to those students that have applied to FCC and also completed and submitted the Application for Nuclear Medicine Technology to the Allied Health and Wellness Department.

    Admission decisions are based on the successful completion of course requirements; college grade point averages from the eight core prerequisites; and assessment of motivation, knowledge of the discipline(s) and personal qualities appropriate for the profession and for successful completion of the program.

    The students with the highest point total will be accepted conditionally into the Nuclear Medicine Program and will be informed of their status on or before May 1st. Students with equal point values will be ordered by GPA from highest to lowest. Students not gaining admittance to the Nuclear Medicine Program and wishing to be considered for the next year must reapply.

    *Acceptance is contingent upon earning grades of “C” or better in any prerequisites being completed in the spring and summer sessions.

    ** Two attempts include transfer credits.

    *** This is only a recommendation. It is not mandated for program admission.
 
*To be completed by Department of Allied Health and Wellness*

NAME _________________________________
TOTAL POINT VALUE____________________
GPA ___________________________________ 

 

 
SUBJECT POINT VALUE POINTS EARNED
EN 101 1  
BI 103 1  
BI 104 1  
CH 101 1  
PY 101 1  
MA 130 1  
MA 206 1  
MDA 108 1  
FREDERICK, CARROLL, OR
HOWARD COUNTY RESIDENT
1  
GPA  4.00 – 3.50
3.49 – 3.00
2.99 – 2.50
2.49 – 2.00
5
4
3
2
 
SHADOWING PAPER 2  
TOTAL 16  


Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.
We offer a variety of courses ranging from music theory and history, ensemble performance classes, group instruction, and individual applied lessons on over fifteen instruments, including voice and guitar. To find out more about the music courses available and when they are offered, please see the current Schedule of Classes.. If you have any questions, please contact the music department office at 301.846.2566.
 
FCC”s performing ensembles are open to all FCC students, community members, and high school students through college credit or non-credit enrollment.  Our rosters include talented musicians from Frederick and surrounding areas.  All groups rehearse once weekly and have an on-campus concert each semester, in addition to other performing opportunities in the community.  For information regarding eligibility and placement, contact the director listed for each ensemble.
 

Flute Choir

The Frederick Community College Flute Choir, established in 2001, is open to intermediate and advanced flutists.  Current players include talented middle and high school students, college-level students and adults. The size of the ensemble, while not limited, ordinarily averages between 11 and 13 musicians.   Its season, running from September through May, consists of three on-campus recitals and several concerts in the community.
 
The Choir performs a varied repertoire, including classical, jazz and ragtime arrangements of standard literature, as well as numerous works written specifically for Flute Choir.  Past programs have featured such popular works as:
 
  • “Hallelujah Chorus” from G.F. Handel’s Messiah
  • “Night on Bald Mountain” by Modest Mussorgsky
  • “Alexander’s Ragtime Band”  by Irving Berlin
  • “Sleeping Beauty” and  “Nutcracker Suite” by P.I. Tchaikovsky
  • “Celtic Suite’ and “Caderas” by Michael Coolen
  • “Stone Suite” by Sonny Burnette
  • “Mother Goose Suite” by Maurice Ravel
 
The FCC Flute Choir currently owns one bass flute and two alto flutes and will often add string bass, bass clarinet, harp or percussion to its programs. Past concert themes include:
 
  • “Flutes Around the World”
  • “Voices of the American West”
  • “Jazz It Up”
  • “Fairytales and Legends”
  • “A Patriotic Salute to Veterans”
The Choir rehearses Wednesday evenings during the fall and spring semesters.  For specific course number and enrollment, consult the Continuing Education Schedule.
 
Prospective players are invited to contact Flute Choir Director Jennifer Rundlett to arrange a phone interview and audition.
 

Jazz Ensembles

The FCC Jazz Ensemble has flourished under the leadership of Howard Burns, who became its director in 1990.  The group regularly participates in area swing dances, jazz clinics, community events, and college activities.  In the past few years, the Ensemble ahs developed a reputation for its polished sound and its mastery of sophisticated jazz repertoire.
 
Membership is open to high school students, community members and college students.  For credit enrollment in MU119, 120, 219 or 220, see the Credit Schedule of Classes.  Permission of instructor is required.  For non-credit enrollment, see the Continuing Education Schedule of Classes.
 
For more information, contact the director, Howard Burns at 301.733.0859.
 

Jazz Two!

The weekly Jazz Two ensemble meets Monday evenings during the fall and spring semesters. It focuses on all aspects of jazz performance, including jazz theory, harmony, rhythms and improvisation. Students collaborate in small groups to make their own arrangements of the songs. Jazz Two includes a mixed group of instrumentalists.
 
“Together they learn songs from the standard jazz repertoire and work on the many aspects of improvising and playing small group jazz,” said Thomas. “Working with only a melody line and chords, the class members create their own arrangements of the songs.”
 
Members of Jazz Two are both credit and noncredit students. Many are Frederick residents, but some travel from Hagerstown, Md., and Harper’s Ferry, .W.VA., to participate.
 
New members are welcome and may contact director Anita Thomas to learn more about the ensemble.
 

Percussion Ensemble

The FCC Percussion Ensemble is open to college students and community musicians with a love of percussion. In addition to performing standard percussion ensemble repertoire and transcriptions of rock, jazz and popular music, the group will explore percussion music from around the world.
The only requirement for joining the ensemble is the ability to read music.  Previous ensemble experience on drums, keyboard or auxiliary percussion is recommended, but not required. Includes participation in an on-campus recital.  The Ensemble currently rehearses on Friday evening, 6 to 8 p.m.  For more information, contact Greg Herron at 443.621.8694). For specific course number and enrollment, consult the Continuing Education Schedule.
 

Wind Ensemble

FCC’s  fastest-growing ensemble is open to FCC students, the area’s top high school students, and talented musicians of all ages from Frederick and surrounding areas.  Repertoire includes concert band standards, marches, light classical, Broadway, jazz and movie soundtracts.  Rehearsals are Wednesdays, 6:30- 9 p.m. at Monocacy Middle School Band Hall.
Students may enroll for credit or non-credit.  For non-credit enrollment, see the Education schedule.  For credit enrollment in MU123, 124, 223, or 224, see the Credit Schedule of Classes.  For more information, contact the director, Aaron Lovely or 703.401.8971.
 

Chorale Ensemble

Choral Arts Society of Frederick
FCC currently maintains two vocal ensembles, The Choral Arts Society of Frederick, open to community members by audition, and FCC students (MU117, 118, 217, 218), and a Chamber Ensemble, open to FCC students by audition.  Rehearsals for the Choral Arts Society are Tuesday evenings from 7:45-10:20 p.m. and the Chamber Ensemble meets at various times based on student schedules.

The Choral Arts Society of Frederick has been in existence for over 60 years, and performs 2 concerts on the FCC campus each year.  In addition to these concerts, the CASF has performed with the Maryland Symphony Orchestra, the Howard Burns Big Band, The Maryland Renaissance Festival and at venues throughout the city and state.
The Chamber Ensemble will perform Chamber Music of the Renaissance to present, and will meet once a week, at the discretion of the director.
Past Repertoire Includes:
  • Requiem (Mozart)
  • The Messiah, G.F. Handel
  • Magnificat, A. Vivaldi
  • Lord Nelson Mass, Haydn
  • Africa, The King’s Singers
  • Liebesleider Waltzes, J. Brahms
  • O Whistle and I’ll Come to Ye, M. Wilberg
  • Java Jive, The Manhattan Transfer
For information or to schedule an audition, please contact Lynn Staininger, 443.621.8694
 

String Ensemble

FCC’s newest ensemble, The FCC String Ensemble is open to all community, college, secondary and elementary school string players—violin, viola, cello and bass.  Anyone with the prerequisite of at least one year of study on an instrument is invited to participate.  Instructor Lynn Fleming will find music from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Contemporary musical periods to fit the ensemble.  The group currently rehearses on Tuesday evenings.

Students may register for the FCC String Ensemble through the College’s Continuing Education division or for credit through the academic division (MU171).  For more information contact Lynn Fleming, 301.972.4296
 

Frederick Symphony Orchestra

The Frederick Symphony Orchestra is a community orchestra which rehearses and performs at FCC.  College students may enroll in Orchestral  Ensemble (MU121, 122, 221, 222) to play with the orchestra through FCC’s credit program.  Permission of instructor and audition required.  Please see the FSO website www.fredericksymphony.org  for more information, or contact the FCC instructor, James Tung.

The orchestra rehearses Thursday evenings at FCC.
 
 

AAT Requirements

  • Admission to the four-year institution is a “two-step” process and is not guaranteed. Applications to both the institution and to the teacher education program may be required.
  • Due to space limitations at some four-year institutions and/or teacher education programs, students should apply as early as possible and consider alternatives. Students should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution to determine the specific admissions requirements and deadlines of the institution to which they wish to transfer. 
  • Upon admission to a Maryland public or independent four-year institution teacher education program, up to 64 semester hours, including the lower division teacher education program outcomes, will transfer without further review.
  • The AAT degree holder is considered to have satisfied the following lower division requirements for the education program.
    • 30 - 36 semester hours of general education requirements for public institutions.
    • The lower division outcomes for teacher education may be included in courses such as the foundations of education, human growth/child or adolescent development, educational psychology, introductory field experience, and introductory special education. In addition, some students may be required to complete up to two additional lower division teacher education courses. Check with your advisor at your college for specific requirements for your major.
• Students in Secondary Education AAT programs must complete specified content courses.

Upon Transfer

The student will be required to complete the remaining 10 - 16 semester hours of general education requirements of the public institution. Students planning to attend an independent institution should consult with an advisor at the four-year institution regarding the remaining general education requirements.

The student will also be required to complete the remaining teacher education program requirements, upper-division institutional requirements, and any other general institutional degree requirements. Students enrolling in a Secondary Education program will also be required to complete the remaining content area requirements.

Additional Information

  • Information regarding upper-division requirements may be obtained by contacting the appropriate four-year institution’s advisor, dean, director, or chair of education.
  • More information is available at the Maryland Higher Education Website (MHEC): www.mhec.state.md.us
Prepares students for employment as a manager in the hospitality industry.
 

Gainful Employment Information

 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
BU2 73–Business Communication 3
BU2 27–Principles of Management 3
HOS 110–Introduction to Hospitality Management 3
HOS 216–Food and Beverage Operations  or
HOS 219–Foundations of Lodging Management
3
HOS 218–Hospitality Information Systems 3
HOS 121–Sanitation and Food Safety 2
Total 26
To earn the A.A.T., students must achieve a minimum of a 2.75 cumulative GPA and earn a “C” or better in all courses used to satisfy the A.A.T. requirements. Students must also provide the Registrar's Office with qualifying scores on one of the state-approved basic skills tests for future teachers. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor at their transfer institution as early as possible and should be aware that some colleges and universities may require higher GPAs and/or additional tests.
Students will be able to:
  1. Perform as a soloist in a manner that is both musically expressive and technically proficient.
  2. Interpret a variety of styles, periods and genres according to recognized standards of performance practice.
  3. Perform in collaboration with other musicians, using appropriate performance and stage presence techniques.
  4. Demonstrate keyboard proficiency, including mastery of scales, triads, chord progressions, and figured bass.
  5. Sing tonal melodies that contain chromatic writing, modulations, and differentiated rhythmic values.
  6. Transcribe from an aural source material of intermediate melodic, harmonic and rhythmic complexity.
  7. Master current musical software programs (Sibelius and/or Finale), including ability to compose or arrange music.

Business Administration

This program is for students who plan on transferring to a four year college/university and earning a bachelor’s degree in a business related major. In today’s competitive marketplace a bachelor’s degree is becoming the minimum requirement for most professional level jobs in management, finance, marketing, human resources, logistics, and other business fields.

Do you like working as part of a team, developing a plan, and seeing it through to completion? Do concepts like leadership, entrepreneurship, marketing, capital structure, employee motivation, marginal costs, risk management, globalization, SWOT, and strategic planning pique your interest? If so, maybe a career in the dynamic world of business is for you. Business majors learn the latest management, technology, and communications skills, enabling them to work in a changing global marketplace. Career paths in business are very diverse; including marketing, general management, financial services, human resources, business consulting, international business, logistics, and project management. As with most careers, earnings and upward mobility are highly related to the level of education you achieve.

Skills You Learn

Students in the Business Administration Transfer A.A. degree program at FCC will take courses in economics, accounting, basic business, computing, statistics, general education and elective courses to prepare them for more advanced business studies at a transfer college. The A.A. degree in Business Administration Transfer also prepares students for entry level jobs or advancement in business prior to transfer.
 

Faculty

In addition to highly qualified full-time faculty, the program utilizes local business professionals who teach on an adjunct basis in their area of education and expertise.

To earn the A.A.T., students must achieve a minimum of a 2.75 cumulative GPA and earn a “C” or better in all courses used to satisfy the A.A.T. requirements. Students must also provide the Registrar's Office with qualifying scores on one of the state-approved basic skills tests for future teachers. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor at their transfer institution as early as possible and should be aware that some colleges and universities may require higher GPAs and/or additional tests.
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
BLD 101–Introduction to Building Trades 3
BLD 141–Fundamentals of Structural Wiring 4
BLD 142–Residential Electric 3
Total 10
Delivering basic emergency management skills and experience pertinent to immediate entry-level employment in the field, the Emergency Management LOR utilizes specific FEMA IS curriculum in a condensed 6-8 credit program.
 
Through a unique partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), FCC utilizes FEMA Independent Study (IS) curriculum - consisting of self-paced online courses - to deliver this valuable program to FCC students. Students complete specific FEMA IS courses, follow a simple online process to convert the coursework to college credit and then enroll in a 5-week online module to receive the Emergency Management Letter of Recognition. Visit FEMA IS Conversion to learn more.
 
Individuals interested in earning an Emergency Management Letter of Recognition are strongly encouraged to first contact the Emergency Management Academic Program Manager, prior to enrolling, to facilitate the process while carefully selecting courses based on interests and educational requirements.

 
Requirements Credits
FEM 113–Comprehensive Emergency Management 1
FEM 131–Principles of Emergency Management 1
Select a module of instruction approved by the program manager.
Modular exam must be passed.
4/6
Total 6/8

Note: After completing FEM Module courses indicated above, students must pass a comprehensive exam on that module.

Click here for details on the modules available.  


 

History A.A.

Students will be able to:
  1. Graduates will evaluate both primary and secondary sources.
  2. Graduates will apply and properly cite both types of evidence in their written work.
  3. Graduates will employ a formal style of writing and the professional ethics that historians use in their work.
  4. Graduates will use basic research techniques in history.
  5. Graduates will demonstrate a general familiarity with the intellectual, political, economic, social, and cultural history of the United States and Europe.
  6. Graduates will create a thesis statement exploring historical issues.
Q: Is the RC program accredited?
A: Yes, it is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC)

Q: If I am already in a respiratory program, may I transfer into the FCC program?
A: No, not at this time.

Q: When is the application deadline?
A: June 1st

Q: What is job shadowing and what is the procedure?
A:The job shadow point is earned by arranging your own visit and then attending. We do not assist in the job shadow  process; students earn the point through their own efforts and by attending the job shadow. However, University of Maryland Medical System Respiratory Dept. has expressed interest in having prospective RC applicants do their shadow experience at their facility.

Start by contacting the hospital that is most accessible for you.​ This may be the hospital in your neighborhood/community or a hospital where you have contacts.

Contact the Respiratory dept. at whatever hospital you choose and tell them you would like to job shadow/observe a therapist. They usually help you contact the proper channels from there (if they are able).

Initiate the  process early because most hospitals require your immunization record for admission to the hospital and a background check (for patient safety). 

There is no specific amount of hours required but stay long enough to get a feel for the work of a Respiratory Therapist (that is the goal of the shadow)

After the job shadow experience, a note must be written, by the therapist you observed, manager or supervisor on duty, stating date and time of the job shadow (therapist must put phone number on it and sign it).

The job shadow confirmation note can be mailed, emailed, or faxed to: 
mail: 
Respiratory Program 
7932 Opossumtown Pike
Frederick, MD 21702
Email: Rhonda Patterson
Fax: 301 624 2889 

Q: What courses transfer from other colleges attended?
A:Please apply to FCC and send your transcripts so that the transcript evaluator can review your transcripts and provide this information.

Q: How many total points should I have on the point scale for the best chance for admission?
A: 13 points

Q: How many people apply to the program each year?
A: approximately 60

Q: How many people do you accept each year?
A: 25

Q: What courses should I complete to have the best chance for admission?
A: A&P 1, A&P 2, english 101, psychology 101, any credit math, any physical ed. or health ed, group discussion, microbiology BI 120

Q: How much does it costs for the entire program?
A: In County Tuition: 17, 393.00 ($189.45 per credit x 67 credits = 12,693.15 + Clinical Costs: $4700 (Books, Supplies, Travel) Note: this estimate is for in county tuition rate.

Q: What GPA is required?
A: Must have at least a 2.0 to apply. A 2.5 would be competitive.

Q: I’m taking summer courses. Will these summer courses be counted toward my application point scale?
A: No, All courses for consideration and evaluation for admission to the RC program must be completed before the June 1 application deadline.

Q: Several years have elapsed since I took my courses? Will they still be accepted?
A: Yes, the RC program will accept the courses passed with a ‘C’ or better, no matter how long ago they were taken.

Q: Once admitted to the program, is there a required amount of RC courses I must take each semester?
A: Yes, the program courses are sequential and pre-requisites for the following semesters.
RC 100, RC 102, & RC 104 must be taken together in the first fall semester. RC 103, RC 105, RC 107, & RC 109 must be taken together in the first spring semester. RC 110 must be taken in the summer. RC 202, RC 204, RC 206, & RC 208 must be taken together in the second fall semester.RC 203, RC 205, RC 207, & RC 209 must be taken together in the second spring semester.
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation. For more information, visit the Career & Transfer Center, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, 301.846.2594.

The Associate of Arts degree program in Digital Media Design is for students:

  • who are interested in transferring to four-year colleges or universities to pursue a bachelor’s degree, and
  • whose career goals are oriented toward the mass media in the fields of graphics and publication design, video production, photography, public relations and corporate communications.
Television Production:
Students in FCC’s Television Production program learn:
  • skills and procedures for entry-level employment in a professional production facility;
  • how to think critically, solve problems effectively, communicate ethically, and demonstrate
  • professional behavior consistent with industry standards;
  • how to plan, produce and edit television segments that reflect current visual media standards and
  • communicate appropriately to a target audience; and
  • about digital television media applications for the Internet and for emerging technologies.

Graduates of the program are well-qualified for positions in both broadcast and non-broadcast media production. On-the-job duties may include:
  • digitally editing and creating motion graphics and effects,
  • directing, lighting and operating equipment for multi-camera studio productions,
  • planning, shooting and editing news and field production projects for a variety of clients, and
  • authoring customized interactive CD-ROMs and DVDs for training and education using digital media.

Computer Graphics:
Graphic designers use computer software to:
  • develop the layout and design of magazines, newspapers, journals, corporate reports, websites and other print and electronic pieces,
  • produce promotional displays and marketing brochures for products and services,
  • design corporate identity systems and company logos for products and businesses, and
  • develop signage systems (called environmental graphics).
On the job duties may include coordinating projects through all phases of production from design to printing to delivery.

In hands-on classes, students solve design problems with instruction from active communications professionals, using hardware and software they will encounter in the workplace. College-level reading and writing are expected. Completion of the Computer Graphics program prepares students for entry-level positions with independent graphics firms, or in corporate design departments.

Applicants for a Maryland CPA license must:

  1. Satisfactorily complete a Board approved-accounting curriculum while earning a minimum of 150 semester hours or their equivalent.
  2. Pass the Uniform CPA Examination. Examination candidates must pass each of the following sections of the Uniform CPA Examination with a grade of 75%: Auditing and Attestation (AUD), Business Environment and Concepts (BEC), Regulation (REG), and Financial Accounting and Reporting (FAR).
  3. After passing the Uniform CPA Examination, a candidate must complete a Home Study Course in Professional Ethics that is offered by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. The candidate must send a copy of the ethics course completion certificate with the Report of Practical Experience in order to complete the license application process.
  4. Following passage of the Uniform CPA Examination, an applicant must file a Report of Practical Experience that documents that the applicant has a minimum of 2,000 hours of experience in accounting-related activities verified and endorsed by a licensed CPA.
(FCC courses are recommended based on information provided by the Maryland Department of Licensing and Regulation. However, the college has no authority over the state’s acceptance of any courses to satisfy specific requirements. Those interested in more information regarding the requirements to sit for the CPA exam in Maryland should contact the State Board of Public Accountancy, 500 N. Calvert Street, Room 308, Baltimore, MD 21202-3651 or email cpa@dllr.state.md.us or call 410.230.6258.)

For more specific information concerning Maryland Requirements go to DLLR’s website at:  http://www.dllr.state.md.us/license/cpa/cpaexam/. Additional information concerning the uniform CPA exam can also be found at:  http://www.aicpa.org/.
 

CPA Licensing in Other States

Prospective accounting majors should carefully research accounting curricula and the requirements of any states in which they hope to become licensed.

All states use the four-part Uniform CPA Examination prepared by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). The CPA examination is rigorous, and less than one-half of those who take it pass any part they attempt. Candidates are not required to pass all four parts at once, but most states require candidates to pass all four sections within 18 months of passing their first section. The CPA exam is now computerized and is offered two months out of every quarter at various testing centers. Most states also require applicants for a CPA certificate to have some accounting experience requirement (Maryland’s experience requirement is 2,000 hours - see DLLR website for details); however requirements vary by state or jurisdiction.

Due to the complexity of the Uniform CPA Exam, many students find a CPA exam review course helpful to achieve their goals of passing the CPA exam. FCC does not offer such a review course; however, there are numerous commercial providers of CPA exam study materials including CD, online, or in-class formats. 
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation. For more information, visit the Career & Transfer Center, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, 301.846.2594.

Associate of Arts degree in Criminal Justice

Students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the 3 major components of the Criminal Justice System.
  2. Describe the methods of gathering data of crime.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the United State constitution and Supreme Court decisions affecting individual rights and law enforcement practices.
  4. Explain the history of the Criminal Justice System in the United States.
  5. Explain the Maryland Court System.


Certificate Corrections

Students will be able to:
  1. Explain the Correctional system at the local, state, and federal levels and how they function and interact.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of Corrections in the United States.
  3. Explain how an offender passes through and is dealt with by the judicial  system after being charged with criminal acts.
  4. Identify the treatment programs offered in the local, state, and federal levels of corrections.
  5. Explain the function of parole, probation and mandatory release.
  6. Explain the process of the Death Penalty in the United States.
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation.
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation. 
Provides students with basic accounting and computer skills including recording transactions using generally accepted accounting principles, preparing financial statements, and using a computerized accounting system.
 
Course Credits

Departmental Requirements


 
ACCT 100–Business Accounting 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
ACCT 111–Computerized Accounting 3
Total 9
Q) Does certification in ASL Studies mean I am certified to be an ASL Interpreter?
A) No, to be a certified ASL interpreter you need to apply directly to www.RID.org

Q) What job opportunities do I have if I complete the certification ASL Studies program?
A) This program will give you the fundamentals in ASL and Deaf people. It is our goal for you to transfer or continue your ASL related studies and get a higher degree. Career opportunities include ASL interpreting, teaching at Deaf schools, service provider professionals, and community educators.

Q) Are all your faculty Deaf?
A) Yes, all our ASL Studies Program faculty are native ASL users.

Q) Can I test out of ASL classes?
A) Yes, you can test out of ASL classes. Contact the program coordinator.

Q) I see ASLS 100 ASL Fingerspelling, 101 Visual Gestural Communication and ASLS 102. Can I start with ASLS 102?
A) Yes you can start at ASLS 102 first but ASLS 100 and ASLS 101 are recommended.

Q6) I heard that FCC will start an ASL Interpreting Education program?
A6) Yes, it is currently in the works. We are building the ASL Interpreting program.

Q) I took ASL in high school. What do you recommend?
A) You have the option to test out or be evaluated for higher level placement. Please contact the program coordinator.

Q) Why should I take up ASL Studies Certification program?
A) There is a large Deaf community in the Frederick area and there are opportunities to interact with the Deaf community socially and professionally. We want to build bridges to connect the hearing community to the Deaf community.
We encourage students to engage in learning both inside and outside the classroom. To promote learning outside the classroom, all honors courses require students to attend co-curricular events. The Honors College also sponsors a variety of student organized activities each year, and the Center for Student Engagement at FCC offers even more engagement opportunities.  With 25 service hours in two projects and a reflection paper, students can earn a service certificate. Leadership opportunities are available through the Honors Student Association, Phi Theta Kappa, and Honors College internships. Student leaders can also complete workshops and earn a leadership certificate.
Graduation Criteria for the ST Programs

The student will:
  1. Meet all academic, financial, and graduation criteria for Frederick Community College.  Refer to the current catalog.

  2. Pass all ST courses with a minimum of a “C” grade. Refer to the ST course lists.

  3. Participate in and document at least 120 surgical procedures according to the latest criteria found in the Association of Surgical Technology’s Core Curriculum for Surgical Technology.
FCC and the Frederick County Public Schools have an articulation agreement that awards college credit for selected Frederick County Public Schools coursework. To receive credit for these courses, students must have earned a specific grade as designated in the various agreements. Students should consult with their high school guidance office to plan their coursework.  Upon successful completion of the coursework, the student should submit an official high school transcript directly to the Assistant Registrar for Transfer Evaluation in the Welcome Center. College credit will be posted on the student’s transcript if the credits are applicable to their degree program. If needed, these credits can also be used as free electives.

Note: Students must be admitted to FCC for credit to be awarded. 

For more information, see the Give Yourself Credit brochure.

1. What types of programs are available?

Frederick Community College offers 3 levels of nursing education.  The Practical Nursing Certificate Program (PN), the Associate Degree (RN) Nursing Program, and the LPN-RN Transition Program are offered through academic (credit) programs.  If you are interested in the Nursing Programs, you need to fill out an admissions application and take placement tests.  Contact the Welcome Center at 301-846-2431 for information on applications and placement testing. 

 

2. How long does it take to complete the Practical Nursing Certificate (PN) program?

The Practical Nursing Certificate Program (LPN) takes approximately two years to complete the entire program (if the student does not have previous college credits). There are two educational components in the Practical Nursing Certificate Program. In the pre-requisite stage, students must complete all developmental course work, 12 credits of science courses, and (to be competitive) English Composition and Human Growth & Development. These courses can be completed part-time or full-time, evenings, days or weekends.

The second educational component, the practical nursing clinical segment, is one full year (September through August), part-time days only, consisting of classes and clinical experiences. There is also an optional 1-credit summer course on dosage calculation before the fall clinical courses start.  Some evening clinical experiences are available.  Required classes meet in the fall, spring, and summer semester.  There are no evening LPN classes available.  Graduation is in late July.

 

3. How long does it take to complete the Associate Degree in Nursing (RN) program?

The Associate Degree Nursing Program (RN) takes approximately three to four years for a full-time student to complete the entire program (if the student does not have previous college credits). There are two educational components in the Associate Degree Nursing Program. In the pre-requisite stage, students must complete all developmental course work and the 12 credits of science courses. These pre-requisites can be done part-time or full-time, evenings, days or weekends.  It is highly advised that all 37 credits (11 courses total) of general education (non-nursing) courses be completed prior to entering the clinical component, in order to be competitive for admission to the clinical program. The second educational component, the nursing clinical segment, is two (2) years, part-time consisting of nursing classes and clinical experiences. Some evening clinical experiences are available.

There are two class options for the Associate Degree (RN) Program. The Day Option consists of nursing classes and clinical experiences during the day. A few evening clinical experiences are available for the day students. The Evening Weekend Option consists of classes during weekday evenings and clinical experiences on weekend days.

The Day Option begins every August. The Evening Weekend Option begins every January.
RN majors in the Day Option may elect to take the PN certificate summer semester on a space-available basis. Upon completion of the summer semester, the student is eligible to take the LPN licensure exam.
 

4. Will classes taken at another college transfer?

A student who has completed any or all of the general education (pre-requisite) courses required in either of the nursing programs may transfer those courses into the program from an accredited college or university. Only grades of “C” or better may be applied toward the nursing programs. Transfer credit for nursing courses is at the discretion of the Director of Nursing Education.


To obtain an evaluation of your college credits, the student must request an official transcript to be sent from the transfer school. The Transfer Services Specialist will evaluate the credits and transfer in any courses that may equate to FCC courses in the major. The maximum number of credits accepted as transfer to FCC is 45.

 

5. What prerequisites are required for the Nursing Programs?

For the PN program, students must complete developmental courses* and the following college-level courses before being admitted into the clinical component.
BI103 - Anatomy & Physiology I
BI104 - Anatomy & Physiology II
BI120 - Microbiology for Allied Health
 
These additional courses must be completed prior to graduation. It is highly advised that they be completed prior to entering the clinical component.
EN101 - English Composition I
ED/PS208 - Human Growth & Development
 
For the RN program, students should complete all developmental courses (see next section) and the following college-level courses before being admitted into clinicals:
BI103 - Anatomy & Physiology I
BI104 - Anatomy & Physiology II
BI120 - Microbiology for Allied Health
 
These additional courses must be completed prior to graduation. It is highly advised that they be completed prior to entering the clinical component.
EN101 - English Composition I
PS101 - General Psychology
ED/PS208 - Human Growth & Development
(ED/PS208 may be titled Life Span Development at other colleges)
SO101 - Introduction to Sociology
CMSP103 or CMSP105 or CMSP107 - Communications Elective
General Education: Math Elective
General Education: Humanities Elective
General Education: Arts Elective
Any PE or Health course (PE 108 or HE102 are recommended)

 

6. What are developmental courses?

Developmental courses are pre-college-level courses that may be required to bring your English and math skills to college level. The need for developmental coursework is determined by the college placement tests.

 

7. When do the Nursing clinical classes begin?

Nursing clinical classes begin during the fall semester for the Day Option and spring semester for the Evening Weekend Option.
 

8. How do I apply for admission into the clinical component?

Applications for both the Day and Evening Options can be found on the FCC web site www.frederick.edu.
Applications may be submitted to the Nursing Department Office (L-114).  Applications are not accepted via fax or email.

 

9. When is the application deadline for the Nursing clinical class?

For both the LPN and the RN Day Option, the clinical class application deadline is February 1. The Evening Weekend Option of the RN program application deadline is September 15th prior to the January start date. Admission into the nursing programs is competitive and selective and based on a point system.

 

10. How does the Point System work?

Points are given for the general education (non-nursing) course completed, cumulative GPA and Frederick County residency. Students with the highest point totals will be admitted to the clinical component.

 

11. What if I am already a LPN and want to become an RN?

LPN’s with an active unencumbered Maryland LPN license who did not graduate form FCC may enter the second year of the Associate Degree Program after completion of the LPN Transition summer program.

 

12. How can I transition from RN to BSN?

A new state wide RN to BSN articulation model became effective September of 2003. This model allows students to transfer 70 non-nursing credits from a community college. Nursing credits will not be transferred. However, individuals with an active, unencumbered Maryland or compact RN license articulating to the baccalaureate level are awarded a minimum of 30 upper division nursing credits in the program they are entering. All Maryland state 4-year colleges and universities and many Maryland private college and universities offering RN programs adhere to this articulation agreement.
For more information, contact the Allied Health Advisor 301-846-2652 or The Director Of Nursing Education 301.846.2524.
 

13. Which healthcare facilities are utilized for the clinical experiences?

Frederick Community College Nursing students currently complete clinical experiences at the following sites: Clinical sites may vary from semester to semester.
  • Carroll Hospital
  • Citizens Care and Rehabilitation Center
  • College View Center
  • Frederick Memorial Hospital                                 
  • Glade Valley Nursing Home
  • Med-Star Montgomery Medical Center
  • Shady Grove Adventist Hospital
  • Suburban Hospital
  • Way Station

14. What other requirements are there for nursing programs?

  • Prospective students need to be aware that nursing involves contact with communicable diseases.
  • Uniforms are required for clinical learning experiences. All students must wear the official school uniform.
  • Current CPR Certification (American Heart Association Health Care Provider Course)
All students entering nursing programs must meet the following health requirements:
  • Physical exam
  • 2 step tuberculosis (annual)
  • Rubella, Rubeola and Mumps titre and immunization, if necessary
  • Varicella (chicken pox) titre and immunization, if necessary
  • Hepatitis B screening, vaccine if necessary, or written waiver
  • Yearly influenza
  • Proof of 3 series polio vaccine
The Maryland Board of Nursing prohibits nursing students from taking care of clients if the student compromises client safety. In accordance with this law, the instructor is obliged to dismiss students from a unit if a condition exists which compromises client safety, such as fatigue, substance abuse, physical illness, emotional instability, or inadequate preparation for clinical experience.

Any student who is under the influence of any chemical substance (drugs or alcohol) may be terminated from the nursing program.

Conviction of a felony may prohibit the student from gaining licensure.
See the next page for a list of essential functions which nursing students must be able to perform in order to succeed.
All students are required to undergo drug screening and background checks.

 

15. Will conviction of a felony or misdemeanor prohibit me from entering the nursing program?

No it will not. However, conviction of a felony or misdemeanor may prohibit the student from taking the licensure exam. Each case is decided on an individual basis by the Maryland Board of Nursing at the time of application for licensure. Please see the Director of Nursing Education prior to enrolling as a nursing major to discuss the options.
Admissions Policy & Procedure
 

Selective Admissions

Admission to FCC’s nursing programs is competitive and priority is given to residents of Frederick County. Applications for admission to the nursing program should be completed by February 1 for the day option (LPN and fall RN programs) or September 15 for the evening/weekend option (spring RN program). This includes applying for admission to the college through the Admissions Office, completion of placement tests and arranging an interview with the Allied Health Advisor.
 

TEAS

Information and frequently asked questions about the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) exam will be posted on this link no later than June 20, 2014.  Please refer back after June 20th to get registration and testing information about the TEAS.

 

Associate Degree Nursing and Practical Nursing Certificate

Enrollment in the clinical portion of the associate degree nursing (ADN) program and the practical nursing (PN) certificate is limited by the availability of staff and facilities. To be considered for admission, students must:
  1. Complete and submit an application for admission and provide proof of residency.
  2. Complete and submit a separate application for the ADN program or the PN certificate program to the Department of Nursing by February 1st preceding the expected the fall semester entrance and September 15th for the expected spring semester entrance. Applications are available online at www.frederick.edu/nursing. Residents of Frederick County are given priority consideration for admission.
  3. Register and complete the Test of Essential Academic Skills Version 5 (TEAS V) before the application deadline. Information on TEAS Version 5 may be found at www.frederick.edu/nursing.
  4. Submit official transcripts from all previously attended colleges and universities to the Welcome Center by the deadline.
  5. Complete FCC’s assessment testing unless otherwise exempted.
  6. Arrange for an appointment with an academic advisor or the allied health and nursing advisor (recommended).

    To be included in the pool of applicants for admission to the clinical portion of the nursing program (ADN) and the practical nursing (PN) certificate, students must complete all required prerequisite coursework, and BI103, BI 104, and BI 120 by the end of the semester in which they are applying and send all official college transcripts from other colleges and universities to the Welcome Center by the deadline.

    A point system is used to select candidates for admission to the clinical portion of FCC nursing programs (ADN, LPN, and LPN-to-ADN Transition). Each program has its own separate pool of applicants, and students may apply only to one program in any given semester. Points are assigned for non-clinical courses completed, residency, a math aptitude test, cumulative grade point average (GPA) and grades in the prerequisite science courses. Any non-science course(s) being repeated must be completed by the end of the January term in order to count in the GPA calculation for the day option or summer session for the evening/weekend option. If a student is completing a prerequisite science course during the application semester, the midterm course grade will be applied to the point scale (including transfer courses). Students will be allowed to repeat any prerequisite science course one time only, including withdrawals, audits, and transfer credits. Repeats before fall 2012 are not counted in the repeat limit. All science prerequisites must be completed within five years of application.

    The students with the highest point total will be conditionally accepted into the ADN program. Students with equal point totals will be ordered by GPA from highest to lowest. If an accepted student declines his/her seat in the program or fails to meet the spring or summer course requirements, the next eligible student with the highest score is offered admission to the program.

    Once grades have been posted in May for day option and January for evening/weekend option, transcripts for those accepted conditionally will again be evaluated. Any student who dropped a course or failed to earn a “C” or better will be re-evaluated. If, after re-evaluation, a student’s new point total falls below the cut-off score for the ADN program, he/she will not be eligible for admittance into the program and the next qualified candidate will be admitted.

    Students not gaining admittance to the ADN program and wishing to be considered for the next entering class must re-apply and will compete within the general applicant pool. A student who fails NU 101 and wants to return to the program will be offered the opportunity to join the pool of applicants for the following year.
 

Criteria for Admission to the Fall 2014/Spring 2015 ADN Clinical Class and Summer 2015 LPN to ADN Transition Program


NOTE: BI103/104/120 may each be repeated only once, including withdrawals, audits, and transfer credits. Course attempts from prior to fall 2012 are not counted in the repeat limit. Students repeating any of these courses more than the allowed number of attempts will not be awarded any points for the applicable course, regardless of grades earned. All sciences must be completed with a grade of C or better within 5 years of the application deadline.
 
Associate Degree Nursing Admissions Criteria  Possible Points
BI103 (Anatomy & Physiology I)  
• 8 points for A, 7 points for B, 6 points for C  
• midterm grades are counted for courses in progress  
• course must have been completed within 5 years of the application deadline 8
BI104 (Anatomy & Physiology II)  
• 8 points for A, 7 points for B, 6 points for C  
• midterm grades are counted for courses in progress  
• course must have been completed within 5 years of the application deadline 8
BI120 or BI203 (Microbiology)  
• 8 points for A, 7 points for B, 6 points for C  
• midterm grades are counted for courses in progress  
• course must have been completed within 5 years of the application deadline 8
Math Aptitude Test  
• 95% or higher: 2 points, 90% 1 point 1/2
Cumulative GPA (including transfer credits)  
• 3.5 or higher: 2 points  
• 3.0 - 3.49:  1 point 2
Prerequisites completed or in progress:  
• EN101 1
• Mathematics General Education course 1
• PS101 1
• SO101 1
• ED/PS208 (Human Growth & Development) 1
• Arts General Education course 1
• Humanities General Education course 1
• Speech course: CMSP103 or CMSP105 or CMSP107 1
Frederick County Resident • 3 points 3
Total possible points: 38/39
 
 
Criteria for Admission to the PN Clinical Class Possible Points
NOTE: BI103/104/120 may each be repeated only once, including withdrawals, audits, and transfer credits. Course attempts from prior to fall 2012 are not counted in the repeat limit. Students repeating any of these courses more than the allowed number of attempts will not be awarded any points for the applicable course, regardless of grades earned. All sciences must be completed with a grade of C or better within 5 years of the application deadline.  
BI103 (Anatomy & Physiology I)  
• 8 points for A, 7 points for B, 6 points for C  
• midterm grades are counted for courses in progress  
• course must have been completed within 5 years of the application deadline 8
BI104 (Anatomy & Physiology II)  
• 8 points for A, 7 points for B, 6 points for C  
• midterm grades are counted for courses in progress  
• course must have been completed within 5 years of the application deadline 8
BI120 or BI203 (Microbiology)  
• 8 points for A, 7 points for B, 6 points for C  
• midterm grades are counted for courses in progress  
• course must have been completed within 5 years of the application deadline 8
Math Aptitude Test  
• 95% or higher: 2 points, 90% 1 point 1/2  
Cumulative GPA (including transfer credits)  
• 3.5 or higher: 2 points  
• 3.0 - 3.49:  1 point 2
Prerequisites completed or in progress  
• EN101 1
• ED/PS208 (Human Growth & Development) 1
Frederick County Resident • 3 points 3
TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS: 29/30


 
Prepares students with the basic skills needed in Construction Management. All of the courses in this LOR may be used in the Construction Management degree.

 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CON 101–Introduction to Construction Management 3
Select two of the following courses:
CON 132, CON 133, CON 140, CON 150, CON 151
6
Total 9
Meets the educational requirements of the Maryland State Department of Education Office of Child Care for the position of child care preschool teacher. In this position, students can teach preschool children in various settings. Students must pass both courses with a “C” or better to receive the LOR.
 
 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
ECD 104–Activities I for Children 3
ED 100–Child Development & Behavior 3
Total 6

Who can enroll in the on-campus Police Science A.A.S. degree program?

The on-campus program is designed for sworn, currently employed Maryland law enforcement officials who are graduates of a Maryland police academy which has been certified by the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commissions (MPCTC).  If you are a Maryland law enforcement official and have graduated from an accredited police academy which has been certified by the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commissions, you can be awarded 29 credits for your course work taken during the academy. 
 

How do I enroll in this program?

To enroll in this program, contact the Police Science Program Manager to have the required credentials sent to FCC.  To be eligible for the 29 articulated credits, current Maryland law enforcement officers must apply to the college for admission; present a copy of their current Certification and Training Standards Compliance Card from the MPTC; and present a copy of their State of Maryland police academy graduation certificate.  All of these documents must be sent to the Police Science Program Manager. 

In addition, all students who seek enrollment at Frederick Community College must take placement tests in reading, writing and mathematics if they have never taken a college-level English and/or math course.
 

Why do I have to take placement tests?

For students to be successful in the courses they take at FCC, they must be ready for college-level work.  To ensure that students are ready for college-level courses, the State of Maryland requires that all students be assessed in the areas of reading, writing and mathematics before enrolling in credit-level courses.  If a student does not receive the appropriate score on placement tests, he or she will be placed in the applicable developmental-level course(s). 
 

Is anyone exempt from taking the placement tests?

Yes, you can be exempt from the placement tests if you:
  • have taken college-level English and/or math and can obtain the official transcripts showing that you have passed these courses at another college;
  • have taken the college-level Accuplacer tests given at another college and scored at an appropriate level within the last two years; or
  • have taken the SAT math test and scored 550 or higher, or the ACT math test and scored 21 or higher.
 

When and where do I take the placement tests?

Placement tests are given at the FCC Testing Center.  For more information about placement tests or their hours of operation, call the Testing Center at 301.846.2522.
 

Why does FCC’s Police Science program award 29 articulated credits to law enforcement students?

The Maryland Higher Education Commission allows Maryland colleges to award up to 30 credits for prior learning provided that learning can be verified through various means of assessment and that it is equivalent to the learning gained through formal collegiate instruction.  Since the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commissions require officers to accurately complete more than 500 learning mandates to become certified as a police officer in the State of Maryland, plus continue ongoing education and firearms training annually, it has been determined that law enforcement officials have met these requirements. 


The articulated courses include:
Course Credits
CJ 106–Police-Community Relations 3
CJ 204–Police Operational Services 3
CJ 212–Criminalistics 4
CJ 220–Criminal Evidence and Procedures 3
CJ 221–Police Defense Tactics 5
CJ 222–Police Arsenal and Procedures 5
CJ 223–Emergency Vehicle Operations Course 3
CJ 224–Awareness Training for Weapons of Mass Destruction; or  
CJ 214–The Correctional Process 3
Total 29
 

What other courses do I need to complete in order to earn my degree?

To complete the degree in Police Science, you will need to complete 31 credits — 22 general education credits and 9 professional credits, in addition to the 29 articulated credits in Criminal Justice courses.  Of those 31 credits, 15 credits must be taken at Frederick Community College. 


Required general education courses:
Courses Credits
EN 101 – English Composition 3
Mathematics Elective (GenEd course) 3/4
CMSP 103 Speech Fundamentals 3
Biological & Physical Sciences Elective (lab course) (GenEd course) 4
Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective (GenEd course)  ‡   3
PE 154 Fitness for Living or HE 201 Stress Management   3
Elective – (GenEd course) ‡ 3
Required professional courses:  
CJ 101 – Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CJ 110 – Criminal Law  3
SO 201 – Criminology  3
Total  31

‡ All degree-seeking students must complete one Cultural Competency course in order to graduate.  This course may satisfy another requirement in your program.  Choose at least one course designated with ‡ from the Cultural Competency list in the current Academic Catalog.
 

Can I complete this degree online?

Yes, this degree can be completed online or in a face-to-face classroom format.  Online courses are taught entirely over the Internet using Blackboard TM and require students to have off-campus Internet access.
 

If I’ve already taken some college-level courses, do I have to take them over again for this program?

You must complete at least 15 of the required 31 credits at Frederick Community College in order to get a Police Science degree from the college. However, if you have transfer credit(s) from another accredited college/university, you may have those official transcripts sent to the Police Science Program Manager for evaluation.  If those courses meet the requirements for the program, up to 16 credits can be transferred in. 
 

Am I responsible for paying the tuition to FCC and buying the books with this accelerated program?

All costs for tuition, fees and books are the responsibility of each student.  Tuition and fees are at the current tuition rate for either in-county or out-of-county students.
 

Can the credits from the Police Science program transfer to a four-year college or university after I graduate?

Frederick Community College has Articulation Agreements with the University of Maryland-University College, American Public University System, Mount St. Mary’s University and Frostburg State University allowing students who have graduated from the Police Science A.A.S. degree program to transfer all their credits to one of the above-mentioned four-year institutions.  Johns Hopkins University also accepts the Police Science degree credits for a four-year degree in Criminal Justice, even though FCC does not have a formal agreement with Johns Hopkins.
Designed for students seeking to build skills in specialty areas (e.g., information security), upgrade current skills, or broaden their general knowledge base in information technology. All CIS courses completed in these certificates apply directly to an A.A.S. degree in information technology.  The Information Security and Assurance Certificate is specifically designed to meet the need for workers in this rapidly growing area of information technology.


Gainful Employment Information

 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CIS 106–Introduction to Object Design and Programming 3
CIS 111M–PC Operating Systems 3
CIS 212–PC Repair & Diagnostics 3
CIS 180–Networking Fundamentals 3
Electives   Complete 3 courses from the following: 9
CIS 170–Security Fundamentals (3)
 
CIS 179–Cybersecurity Fundamentals (3)
 
CIS 217–Network Security Forensics and Audit (3)
 
CIS 218–Information Security and Assurance (3)
 
CIS 219–Ethical Hacking and Systems Defense
 
CIS 223–Cloud Security (3)
 
Total 21
Students will be able to:
  1. Create an object-oriented program that implements data structures.
  2. Identify problem requirements that demonstrate understanding of user needs.
  3. Explain solutions that satisfy problem requirements.
  4. Analyze complexity of problem solutions.
  5. Design problem solutions that demonstrate efficiency.
  6. Construct software applications that implement a Graphical User Interface (i.e., GUI) Front-End.
  7. Produce documentation that describes implementation.
Introduces students to medical information management. The medical scribe specializes in charting physician-patient encounters in real-time during medical exams in a clinic, physician office, urgent care or emergency room.

Students must receive a “C” or better in all MDA courses.
 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
MDA 109–Medical Terminology 3
MDA 112–Medical Administrative Office Applications 3
MDA 220–Introduction to Electronic Health Records 3
Total 9
Prepares students for entry level employment in careers requiring basic business and project management skills.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
EN 101–English Composition  or
BU 273–Business Communication
3
BU 227–Principles of Management 3
BU 290–Project Management 3
Electives  Any BU, ACCT, EC, or CIS 111E Spreadsheets (recommended) 6
Total 24
 
Prepares students for work as a medical practice manager.
Students must receive a “C” or better in all MDA courses.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
BU 227–Principles of Management 3
BU 273–Business Communication 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
MDA 109–Medical Terminology 3
MDA 112–Medical Administrative Office Applications 3
MDA 216–Introduction to Medical Office Coding 3
MDA 218–Health Insurance Billing and Reimbursement 3
MDA 220–Introduction to Electronic Health Records 3
Total 27
The student will
  1. Demonstrate ability to comprehend, apply, and evaluate information pertinent to the practice of surgical technology (cognitive domain).
  2.  Perform, independently, skills required for employment as an entry-level practitioner (psychomotor domain).
  3. Exhibit professional behaviors consistent with college and employer standards for a surgical technologist (affective domain).

Health Care Practice Management

  • To provide students with opportunities to broaden their awareness and understanding of our diverse society and health care needs. 
  • To promote a student-centered learning environment where students know faculty and staff are accessible and supportive of their individual needs. 
  • To help students acquire and strengthen problem solving and critical thinking skills. 
  • To develop students who can analyze, interpret and perform medical office procedures proficiently. 
  • To facilitate and foster the values necessary to practice Medical office administrative duties within the ethical and legal framework of the profession and the community. 
  • To demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate pertinent information to patients, billing specialists, and members of the medical team. 

Medical Assistant Certificate 

  • To produce graduates eligible to take and pass nationally recognized certification examination. 
  • To facilitate and foster the values necessary to practice Medical assisting skills within the ethical and legal framework of the profession and the community. 
  • To produce students who exhibit professional behavior consistent with current academic and professional standards. 
  • To help students acquire and strengthen problem solving and critical thinking skills. 
  • To assist students in performing all necessary duties in a safe environment utilizing all the latest techniques in physician offices, including hazardous materials. 
  • To develop positive student attitudes for the pursuit of lifelong professional growth and development. 
  • To develop and maintain educational partnerships with business, labor, and public sector agencies. 
  • To promote a student-centered learning environment where students know faculty and staff are accessible and supportive of their individual needs. 
Computer science is the study of how computers are designed and used for computation, data processing, and systems control. Professionals in the field design and develop computer hardware and software, and create computer programs that enable computers to perform intended functions.

Frederick Community College’s Computer Science program offers a foundation in programming with credits that can be transferred to a four-year college. The computer science field offers opportunities for employment to graduates with knowledge and skills in computer programming, software development, or applications development.

FCC offers the following program options for students interested in computer science. Credits earned in the certificate program may be applied to the associate degree.

Who can enroll in the Police Science A.A.S. degree program?

Any MSP trooper candidate attending the MSP Academy who does not currently have a degree and would like to earn an A.A.S. degree in Police Science can participate in this program.  All prospective students must attain a certain score on their Writing, Reading and Mathematics placement tests to be admitted to the program. 

Why do I have to take placement tests?

All students who seek enrollment at Frederick Community College must take placement tests in reading, writing and mathematics to determine their readiness for college-level courses.  Because this program is accelerated, it is essential that trooper candidates be college ready and capable of handling all the course work.

Is anyone exempt from taking the placement tests?

Yes, you can be exempt from the placement tests if you:
  • have taken college-level English and/or math and can obtain the official transcripts showing that you have passed these courses at another college;
  • have taken the college-level Accuplacer tests given at another college and scored at an appropriate level within the last two years; or
  • have taken the SAT math test and scored 550 or higher, or the ACT math test and scored 21 or higher.
  •  

When and where do I take the placement tests?

Placement tests will be given at the MSP Academy two weeks after the start of an Academy.

I’m rusty in Math; how can I prepare for the Accuplacer Test?

The following websites offer free online tutorials for algebra.  Not all of the material is covered on the placement test; however, reviewing basic algebra concepts will help you feel more confident when you take the test.
  • http://www.montgomerycollege.edu/Departments/math/placement/placetest.html
  • http://www.testprepreview.com/modules/algebra2.htm
  • http://professionals.collegeboard.com/profdownload/accuplacer-sample-questions-for-students.pdf 

When do classes begin for the Police Science A.A.S. degree program?

Classes begin approximately one month after the start of your Academy.  English, Math, and Stress Management classes are given while you are attending the Academy.  Once you graduate, you will attend classes full time at the Academy for 3 ½ weeks and complete the rest of your courses.  Those classes are the continuation of Math, Forensic Biology, Speech Fundamentals, and Social Problems.

Am I responsible for paying the tuition to FCC and buying the books with this accelerated program?

All of your tuition, fees and books are paid in full by the Maryland State Police.

If I decide not to enroll in the program now, can I come back and enroll after I graduate from the Police Academy?

This accelerated seven month program is only offered to trooper candidates while they are enrolled in the MSP Academy.

This program is structured in such a way that many of the courses you receive credit for are integrated into the learning that is taking place while you are enrolled in the Academy.  If you wait until after you graduate to earn this degree, you must enroll at FCC as a traditional student, and you will be responsible for your own tuition.

When do I take my criminal justice- related courses that are required for this degree?

The criminal justice courses are integrated into your course work during the Academy.  These include, Introduction to Criminal Justice; Police-Community Relations; Criminalistics; Police Defense Tactics; Criminal Law; EVOC; The Correctional Process; Police Operational Services; Criminal Evidence and Procedure; and Police Arsenal and Procedures.

If I’ve already taken a college-level math and/or English, do I have to take it over again for this program?

Yes, you will have to take them again.  The FCC general education courses that you will be taking are not stand-alone courses like they are in the traditional college setting; they are integrated into the learning that is taking place during the day at the Academy. 

As an example, Public Speaking and Social Problems are integrated into your other Academy courses such as Courtroom Demeanor & Presentation, Note Taking and Interviewing Techniques, and Police Communications.  The requirements outlined by the Maryland Higher Education Commission require students to be enrolled in the entire program and not just certain segments, so it is an all-or-nothing program. 

Can the credits from the Police Science A.A.S. degree program transfer to a four-year college or university?

Frederick Community College has Articulation Agreements with the University of Maryland-University College, American Public University System, Mount St. Mary’s University and Frostburg State University allowing students who have graduated from the Police Science A.A.S. degree program to transfer all their credits to one of the above-mentioned four-year institutions.  Johns Hopkins University also accepts the Police Science degree credits for a four-year degree in Criminal Justice, even though FCC does not have a formal agreement with Johns Hopkins.
Gainful Employment Information

 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CIS 111M–PC Operating Systems  
CIS 180 Networking Functions OR 3
CIS 210 Data Communications and Networking 3
CIS 200–IT Support Service 3
CIS 212–PC Repair & Diagnostics 3
Electives (Select 6 credits form any CIS courses)  6
Total 18

Summer Ladder Program

Students who complete the first two semesters of the associate degree nursing program may opt to take the practical nurse certificate summer courses (PN 112, PN 113) on an elective basis. Completion of the summer courses will allow the student to take the licensing exam (NCLEX-PN) for practical nurse licensure. For an explanation of the benefits of the summer ladder option, contact the allied health advisor or the director of nursing education.

Practical Nursing Ladder Program

Graduates of the PN certificate may apply to continue into the second year of the associate degree program once they have completed the required general education courses. Admission into the second year is competitive and must occur within two years of completing the PN certificate. Graduates who do not enter the second year of the associate degree nursing program within two years of completing the PN certificate may enter the associate degree program via the LPN transition program. For more information contact the allied health advisor or the director of nursing education.

RN To BSN

Frederick Community College participates in the Maryland Articulation Model that was revised in fall 2003. A maximum of 70 non-nursing credits will be accepted. Transfer of nursing credits will not be necessary as 30 upper division nursing credits will awarded by the baccalaureate institution based on a valid unencumbered Maryland nursing license.

LPN To ADN

Transition courses (LPN to ADN) have been developed to allow an LPN to complete the ADN program in a shorter amount of time. The LPN must first complete all general education requirements of the ADN program. Admission to this program is competitive and is based on the same point system for the ADN program.

See director of nursing education or allied health advisor for further information.

Early Childhood Development Program

 
Frederick Community College’s Early Childhood Development program prepares students to teach and care for children from infancy to 12 years of age in nursery schools, child care centers, before- and after-school programs and home-based childcare settings. Classes are offered in day, evening, online, hybrid and Saturdays. Some courses are offered in 7-week sessions. Students gain practical experience and a competitive edge in the job market by working in the FCC Children’s Center under the guidance of its professional staff.
 
The Early Childhood Development Program teaches the following skills for child care providers:
  • understanding of child development and behavior,
  • knowledge of developmentally approved practices and materials,
  • familiarity with materials,
  • health, safety and nutrition, and
  • familiarity with appropriate guidance techniques.
 
Students who complete the program are expected to be able to:
  • integrate and implement curriculum areas,
  • develop and implement lesson plans,
  • manage behavior patterns of individuals and groups of children,
  • demonstrate skill in interpreting observed behavior,
  • function effectively in a teaching environment,
  • apply theory and research to classroom practice,
  • assess and respect individual children’s needs, and
  • promote safe and nurturing environments.

Culinary Arts & Hospitality Institute

The Hospitality, Culinary and Tourism Institute (HCTI) offers degree and certificate programs designed to provide students with a strong foundation of knowledge, skills and practical experience to succeed. Courses teach essential technical, business and human relation skills to prepare students for entry level and supervisory positions in the hospitality, culinary and tourism industry.

 

Mission Statement
The Culinary Arts and Hospitality programs at FCC are designed to provide students with the strong culinary foundation and practical skills necessary to succeed in the food service industry. Through hands-on preparation, students will develop skills in fundamental cooking techniques required in a commercial kitchen. Equally grounded in culinary arts and management, the degree content prepares students for entry-level cooking and supervisory positions in the hospitality industry.
 

ACFF Culinary Competencies

At FCC our core culinary courses are aligned with the American Culinary Federation Accrediting Commission's Core Culinary knowledge and skills competencies, which have been set by industry leaders in both culinary arts and culinary arts education.
 

NRAEF ManageFirst® Competencies

FCC has adopted the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) ManageFirst Program® for several of its hospitality courses because it provides students with the real-world skills necessary to excel as managers in the restaurant, hospitality, and food service industry. The program, developed by the NRAEF, was built with extensive input from industry professionals and academics. For each exam passed, students earn an NRAEF certificate, giving them a competitive advantage as they move into the job market. ManageFirst students are also eligible to participate in exclusive NRAEF events and are eligible for special NRAEF scholarships.
 

Memberships & Affiliations

FCC’s Culinary Arts & Hospitality Institute is a member of the following national organizations:
  • American Culinary Federation
  • National Restaurant Association
  • American Hotel and Lodging Association
  • International Council of Hotel, Restaurant & Institutional Education
PART 1: Frederick Community College Admission
  1. Apply for admission to FCC online. Select "My goal now is to earn an associate of applied science (AAS) degree to prepare for a career" and then "Emergency Management A.A.S. degree"

  2. Request official transcripts with previous course work from college, military, EMS, Fire and/or Police experience (see Part 2 below.) Ensure official transcripts or letters are mailed from the institution or training facility directly to FCC:

    Frederick Community College
    Registration and Records Center
    7932 Opossumtown Pike • Frederick, MD 21702

  3. An acceptance letter will then arrive to you via US mail. Upon receipt, visit FCC online and follow the steps to begin enrolling in courses.

  4. Send an email to Emergency Management to inform us you have applied to MACEM's Emergency Management program. An Emergency Management advisor will then contact you to schedule a 20-minute teleconference advising session to prepare you for success at FCC.

PART 2: General Education, Transfers and Conversion Information
  • General Education courses (e.g. English, Math, History, etc.)
    • FCC offers General Education courses on campus and online. (Maryland residents qualify for in-county tuition rates. See class schedules for details.)
    • General Education courses completed at a local college or university are eligible for transfer to FCC. (FEMA courses meet FCC in-residency requirements.)
  • Request review and pre-approval for courses completed at an institution other than FCC using the FCC Permission to Enroll: Verification of Transferability form. Transcript evaluations are conducted in the FCC registration office and results appear in PeopleSoft student accounts online within approximately 4 weeks.

PART 3: Emergency Management Modules
 
Overview
Modules are a specific set of classes focusing on a single topic and include a final exam element. Completed online within a 5-week timeframe, modules are taken after pre-requisite FEMA IS courses have been completed and converted to college credit.
 
Enrollment
Prior to enrolling, complete the Module pre-requisite FEMA IS courses and convert the courses to college credits. Go to your PeopleSoft account to verify conversion of the FEMA IS courses via PeopleSoft and then register for a Module course. (All required FEMA IS courses must be complete and converted prior to enrollment in a Module.)
 
Modules are administered during 5-week sessions within FCC Academic semesters. If a Module is not successfully completed during the 5-week session in which you enrolled, it may not be taken again until the first 5-week session in the following semester. Review the Frederick Community College Academic Calendar to plan accordingly. If you enrolled at FCC prior to August 2008, please contact MACEM directly at Emergency Management to request a module.
Access and Completion
All Modules are administered online through Blackboard, an online learning management system. To get started, enter your Username and Password as noted below.
 
USERNAME
All Students: W before your student ID number (i.e.W123456)
 
PASSWORD
New Students: first two letters of last name and last five digits of student ID (i.e. sm23456)
Returning Students: last four digits of your student ID (i.e. 3456)
 
At the start of the 5-week session, the module appears in Blackboard under “My Courses.” Click on the course and orient yourself with the site, read through course documents detailing proctor instructions and submit “Proctor Site Contact Information” to the assignment folder of the same name.
 
Upon completion of the module, you will receive an email directing you to contact the proctor site to coordinate the exam.
 
PART 4: Emergency Management Internship
 
INTR103: Internship
Students pursuing an Emergency Management Associate of Applied Science degree are required to complete INTR103, a 3-credit internship course. The internship, requiring a minimum of 135 hours, may be completed during an 8-week (17 hours/week) or 15-week (9 hours/week) session of a pre-determined semester.
 
Eligibility
Students may register for INTR 103 after successful completion of Modules 1, 2, and 3. Be sure to review the Internship Workbook, an in-depth manual providing direction, requirements, and forms to utilize throughout the course. Eligible students must then contact the Internship Coordinator to schedule an Internship Planning Meeting to discuss internship plans.
 
Registration
Following the planning meeting, students arrange an internship with a local emergency management entity: a business, municipality, state or federal level agency/office. Following preliminary arrangements, students are required to submit an Internship Plan to the Internship Coordinator to receive approval and complete course registration.
 
Guidelines
Internships must entail Emergency Management experience in a field unrelated to previous or current experience. The internship cannot be performed as part of your normal duty and/or current employment. Students with previous or current emergency management experience are not exempt from completing this required course.
 
PART 5: Graduation
 
Congratulations! To acknowledge all your hard work and accomplishments, students are encouraged to:
  • Request a graduation appointment with your Emergency Management program manager.
  • Confirm all requirements for an Emergency Management A.A.S., Certification or Letter of Recognition have been met.
  • Complete an FCC Graduation Application
  • Participate in an FCC graduation ceremony to receive recognition
Please note, formal student diplomas are mailed to students within 90 days of degree confer dates.
 
Thank you for working toward your future at FCC. It has been a pleasure assisting you on your journey.

 
Non-Discrimination Statement
 
The college prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of race, religion, gender, color, national origin, ancestry, age, sexual orientation, marital status, physical or mental disability of otherwise qualified individuals and any other category protected by federal, state or local law.
 

The following technical standards are essential in order to meet the objectives of the Respiratory Care Program at Frederick Community College. With reasonable accommodations, the student must possess:
 

  1. Fine motor skills sufficient to perform skills such as picking up, grasping, manipulating small objects with hands, and writing with a pen or pencil.
  2. Physical mobility and strength sufficient to move about on a unit and participate in client care.
  3. Physical stamina sufficient to perform client care for entire length of clinical experience (6-8 hours).
  4. Auditory ability sufficient for assessment of client health and safety.
  5. Visual acuity sufficient to distinguish color and see objects up to 20 inches away.
  6. Reading ability sufficient to understand the written word at a minimum of a tenth grade level.
  7. Arithmetic competence that would allow the student to read and understand columns and/or writing, tell time, use measuring tools, and add, subtract, multiply and divide.
  8. Emotional stability sufficient to assume responsibility/accountability for actions, provide client with emotional support, adapt to environmental stress, and monitor own emotions.
  9. Analytical thinking sufficient to transfer knowledge from one situation to another, problem solve, prioritize tasks, and use long-term and short-term memory.
  10. Critical thinking ability sufficient to exercise sound judgment through the sequencing of information and the identification of cause and effect relationships.
  11. Interpersonal skills sufficient to establish rapport with clients and co-workers and respect the rights of others and the differences in clients.
  12. Communication skills sufficient to teach others, explain procedures, interact with others, and convey information in writing.



Adapted from: Yocum, C.J (1996). Validation study: Functional abilities for nursing practice. Published by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.

Students who complete 12 honors credits (3 honors credits must be at the 200-level with an honors research project or completion of an honors independent study project) with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.25 or higher are eligible to graduate from the Honors College. Graduates receive a notation on their transcripts recognizing this achievement.  Further, at the graduation ceremony they wear an Honors College medallion and stand to be recognized. The transcript notation and color of the medallion are based on the student’s grade point average at the time of graduation:
 

GPA Transcript Notation Medallion
3.25-3.49 Honors College Bronze
3.5-3.749 Honors College – Honors Silver
3.75-4.0 Honors College – High Honors Gold

 

FCC provides a tuition payment plan for students who wish to spread payment over several months.  Scholarship and loan assistance is available for eligible students. In addition to general scholarships and loans, the following scholarships are available to Criminal Justice students:
  • Michael D. Boyd Scholarship
  • The McCauley Group and J. Scott & Debra McCauley Endowment Fund
  • W. Allen Yingling, Jr. Memorial Endowment Scholarship Fund
For complete scholarship information, contact the Financial Aid office.
Construction managers evaluate building methods and materials, and determine the most cost-effective plan and schedule. Typically they use estimating and scheduling techniques to bring construction projects to timely completion according to the architect’s plans and within budget.

Construction Management & Supervision students learn:
  • technical expertise in construction methods,
  • materials used in commercial and/or residential construction projects,
  • project management and scheduling,
  • how to read architectural plans and estimate job costs,
  • how to financially manage a construction project,
  • knowledge of current computer applications and software,
  • business management and communications skills,
  • safety principles and practices, and
  • an understanding of construction law, including related federal, state, and county codes.
Employment opportunities include jobs as:
  • project managers and general superintendents,
  • estimators, 
  • construction managers in private industry and public service, or
  • self-employed business owners.
Employment opportunities include:
  • Project managers and general superintendents
  • Estimators
  • Construction managers in private industry and public service
  • Self-employed business owners
Skills You Will Learn
  • Technical expertise in construction methods and materials
  • Understanding of construction law, safety, project management and scheduling
  • Ability to financially manage a construction project
  • Ability to read architectural plans and estimate job costs
  • Knowledge of current computer applications and software
  • Management and communications skills

Digital Media Design Associates Degree:

Students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate proficiency in use of current industry standard software.
  2. Produce works of digital and interactive art in a variety of media.
  3. Demonstrate and appreciate the creative/problem solving process through research, development and execution of digital media.
  4. Comprehend the responsibilities associated with professional behavior by participating in an internship.
  5. Enhance skills as critical thinkers, effective problem solvers and effective ethical communicators who demonstrate professional behaviors consistent with industry standards.
  6. Demonstrate their ability to plan, produce and edit digital productions that reflect an awareness of current visual and interactive media standards appropriate for entry or intermediate level professional work.
  7. Demonstrate current digital media skills, procedures and techniques that will enable them to function successfully as entry-level employees in a professional production facility.


Computer Graphics Certificate:

Students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate proficiency in use of current industry standard software.
  2. Research and produce an informed design and photography appropriate to client/assignment needs.
  3. Produce works of design and photography using a variety of media.
  4. Comprehend the responsibilities associated with professional behavior by participating in an internship.
  5. Produce well-crafted design and photography appropriate for entry or intermediate level professional work.


Television Production Certificate:

Students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate proficiency in use of current industry standard software.
  2. Produce works of digital and interactive art in a variety of media.
  3. Demonstrate and appreciate the creative/problem solving process through research, development and execution of digital media.
  4. Comprehend the responsibilities associated with professional behavior by participating in a internship.
  5. Enhance skills as critical thinkers, effective problem solvers and effective ethical communicators who demonstrate professional behaviors consistent with industry standards. 
  6. Demonstrate their ability to plan, produce and edit digital productions that reflect an awareness of current visual and interactive media standards appropriate for entry or intermediate level professional work.
  7. Demonstrate current digital media skills, procedures and techniques that will enable them to function successfully as entry-level employees in a professional production facility.
 
Students who complete the A.A.S. degree in Paralegal Studies will be able to:
  1. Apply basic legal concepts and fundamental principles of law for varied legal tasks.
  2. Recognize a legal dispute, gather facts, and perform legal analysis for varied legal matters.
  3. Conduct client interviews and prepare witnesses and evidence for presentation at legal proceedings.
  4. Perform legal research and utilize techniques of legal writing in the preparation of legal documents.
  5. Demonstrate conduct consistent with the ethical obligations of the legal profession to avoid ethical violations.
Career

Gives students the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue a career in athletic coaching.
 
Courses Credits
PE 161–Psychology of Sport 3
PE 236–Coaching Principles 3
PE 250–Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
Total 9
 
 
The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation. For more information, visit the Career & Transfer Center, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, 301.846.2594.
Gainful Employment Information

 

Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
BLD 101–Introduction to Building Trades 3
BLD 109–Fundamentals of HVACR 4
BLD 110–Controls for HVACR 3
BLD 113–HVAC Installation & Troubleshooting 3
BLD 114–Fossil Fuels & Hydronic Heating 3
Total 16

Maryland Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) Degree
Program of Quality

  • Outcomes-based standards were developed collaboratively between the two-year and four-year institutions in Maryland for implementation through individually designed community college AAT degree programs.
  • Program outcomes are based on State and National standards.
  • Successful completion of the program requires a cumulative 2.75 GPA and qualifying scores as established by the State Superintendent of Schools on the teacher certification tests (e.g., SAT, ACT, PRAXIS) approved by the State Board of Education to be awarded the AAT degree.
This degree is designed for transfer to most bachelor’s degree granting colleges and universities, however students should carefully coordinate their FCC course selections with an FCC transfer advisor, since each transfer college may require different specific general education or elective courses. For working adult students, FCC has solid transfer relationships with local colleges who specialize in your unique needs – including the Mount Saint Mary’s University Frederick Campus Evening Business Program and the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) Business Program.
Students will be able to:
  1. Identify, apply and discuss major concepts, principles, and theories related to human development by completing one or more papers and projects based on observation of children and adolescents.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of curriculum approaches and effective methods of teaching and learning through creating and presenting lesson plans applicable to course topics.
  3. Compose and collect artifacts (i.e. papers, projects) for current and future portfolios and participate in activities (i.e. case study experiences, interviews) to demonstrate how students differ in their development and approaches to learning.
  4. Demonstrate characteristics of future teachers by behaving professionally at events and experiences both on and off campus, utilizing college-level skills in course assignments, etc.
  5. Develop an initial knowledge base in future teaching content areas by successfully completing coursework in relevant areas.
Students will be able to:
  1. Identify, apply and discuss major concepts, principles, and theories related to human development by completing one or more papers and projects based on observation of children and adolescents.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of curriculum approaches and effective methods of teaching and learning through creating and presenting lesson plans applicable to course topics.
  3. Compose and collect artifacts (i.e. papers, projects) for current and future portfolios and participate in activities (i.e. case study experiences, interviews) to demonstrate how students differ in their development and approaches to learning.
  4. Demonstrate characteristics of future teachers by behaving professionally at events and experiences both on and off campus, Develop an initial knowledge base in future teaching content areas by successfully completing coursework in relevant areas.
Students will be able to:
  1. Identify, apply and discuss major concepts, principles, and theories related to human development by completing one or more papers and projects based on observation of children and adolescents.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of curriculum approaches and effective methods of teaching and learning through creating and presenting lesson plans applicable to course topics.
  3. Compose and collect artifacts (i.e. papers, projects) for current and future portfolios and participate in activities (i.e. case study experiences, interviews) to demonstrate how students differ in their development and approaches to learning.
  4. Demonstrate characteristics of future teachers by behaving professionally at events and experiences both on and off campus, utilizing college-level skills in course assignments, etc.
  5. Develop an initial knowledge base in future teaching content areas by successfully completing coursework in relevant areas.
.
Students will be able to:
  1. Identify, apply and discuss major concepts, principles, and theories related to human development by completing one or more papers and projects based on observation of children and adolescents.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of curriculum approaches and effective methods of teaching and learning through creating and presenting lesson plans applicable to course topics.
  3. Compose and collect artifacts (i.e. papers, projects) for current and future portfolios and participate in activities (i.e. case study experiences, interviews) to demonstrate how students differ in their development and approaches to learning.
  4. Demonstrate characteristics of future teachers by behaving professionally at events and experiences both on and off campus, utilizing college-level skills in course assignments, etc.
  5. Develop an initial knowledge base in future teaching content areas by successfully completing coursework in relevant areas.
How many students are accepted into the NMT Program?
13 seats are available

What is the difference between Nuclear Medicine and Radiology?
The main difference between Nuclear Medicine (including PET) and all other diagnostic modalities is that Nuclear Medicine demonstrates function (physiology) as well as structure (anatomy) of organs or organ systems.
 
How can you work safely around radiation?
You can work safely around radiation by following a few simple precautions:
  1. Use time, distance, shielding, and containment to reduce exposure.
  2. Wear dosimeters (e.g., film, TLD or OSL badges) if issued.
  3. FCC provides students with whole body and ring badges to monitor radiation exposure on a quarterly basis.  At the end of the program students are provided with an end wearer report to document their exposure for the length of time within the program. 
  4. Avoid contact with the contamination.  
  5. Wear protective clothing that, if contaminated, can be removed. 
  6. Wash with nonabrasive soap and water any part of the body that may have come in contact with the contamination.  
  7. Assume that all materials, equipment, and personnel that came in contact with the contamination are contaminated. Radiological monitoring is recommended before leaving the scene.
 
How long does it take to finish the NMT Program?
Recently the nuclear medicine field has expanded to include molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET), and fusion imaging using hybrid scanners, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT.  In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted student will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum after completion of the 8 core prerequisites.
 
Will classes taken at another college transfer?
A student who has completed any or all of the general education (pre-requisite) courses required in either of the nuclear medicine program may transfer those courses into the program from an accredited college or university. Only grades of “C” or better may be applied toward the nuclear medicine program.
 
To obtain an evaluation of your college credits, the student must request an official transcript to be sent from the transfer school. The Transfer Services Specialist will evaluate the credits and transfer in any courses that may equate to FCC courses in the major. The maximum number of credits accepted as transfer to FCC is 45.
 
What pre-requisites are required for the Nuclear Medicine Program?
BI103 - Anatomy & Physiology I
BI104 - Anatomy & Physiology II
CH101- General Chemistry
PY101 – Survey  of Physics
EN101 - English Composition I
MA130 – College Algebra
MA206 - Elementary Statistics
MDA108 – Basic Medical Terminology
 
When do the Nuclear Medicine Technology clinical classes begin?
Nuclear Medicine Clinical rotations begin the first semester of the program, fall semester. 
 
How do I apply for admission into the Nuclear Medicine Technology?
Applications for can be found on the FCC web site www.frederick.edu.  If you are not currently enrolled at FCC, you must apply to FCC before applying to the NMT Program.
 
When is the application deadline for the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program?
The deadline to apply to the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program is April 1st for best consideration.  Rolling admission until all seats are filled.  
 
Which healthcare facilities are utilized for the clinical experiences?
Didactic instruction is held on campus while clinical instruction takes place at one of our affiliated clinical sites.  Students will be required to rotate to at least two clinical sites during the duration of the program.
Current affiliated sites include: 
  • Frederick Memorial Hospital
  • Community Radiology
  • Montgomery General Hospital
  • Northwest Hospital Center
  • Baltimore Washington Medical Center
  • Union Memorial Hospital
  • Shady Grove Adventist Hospital
  • Washington Adventist Hospital
  • Inova Leesburg
  • Chambersburg Hospital 
 
What other requirements are there for nuclear medicine technology program?
  • Prospective students need to be aware that nuclear medicine involves contact with communicable diseases. Students must attend a yearly seminar on universal precautions for blood-borne pathogens and other hazards as required by OSHA.
  • Background check and drug screening.
  • Uniforms are required for clinical learning experiences. All students must wear the official school uniform.
  • Current CPR Certification (American Heart Association Health Care Provider Course)
  • All students entering nuclear medicine technology programs must meet the following health requirements:
  1. Physical exam
  2. Screening test for tuberculosis (annual)
  3. Rubella, Rubeola and Mumps titre and immunization, if necessary
  4. Varicella (chicken pox) titre and immunization, if necessary
  5. Hepatitis B screening, vaccine if necessary, or written waiver
  6. Any specific requirements of an agency
  • Conviction of a felony may prohibit the student from gaining licensure.
 
Will conviction of a felony or misdemeanor prohibit me from entering the nuclear medicine technology program?
 
No it will not. However, conviction of a felony or misdemeanor may prohibit the student from taking the licensure exam.
 
 
 
The objectives of the program are to develop professional entry-level Nuclear Medicine Technologist who will be able to:

  1. Perform all functions according to established policies, procedures, regulatory and accreditation requirements, as well as applicable professional standards.
  2. Produce images providing optimal information obtained with appropriate technique.
  3. Communicate in a professional, positive and tactful manner with patients, physicians, nurses, other health-care and non-health-care employees, as well as fellow clinical personnel.
  4. Maintain patient confidentiality and exercise ethical judgment, integrity, honesty, dependability and accountability in the performance of one’s responsibilities.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to trouble shoot and notify appropriate personnel.
  6. Assume responsibility for one’s work and for professional development.
  7. Apply critical thinking and problem solving in making decisions about imaging exams.
  8. Abide to the guidelines set forth by the Patient Bill of Rights.
  9. Adhere to the SNMTS Code of Ethics in professional practice.
FCC’s Culinary Arts & Hospitality Institute conducts cooking classes and lectures at our facility 200 Monroe Avenue, Frederick, which was designed jointly by Chef Jon Kimbrough and architect Kevin Cromwell.

Perhaps the most state-of-the-art culinary instructional facility in Western Maryland, the facility was designed specifically with our students in mind.  Its design emphasizes the notion of small classes with individualized instruction.

The 6500-square-foot area houses a 40 seat restaurant and two commercial kitchens, including one open à la carte kitchen, and one instructional kitchen with individual work stations for 18 students. Outfitted with Vulcan commercial ovens, ranges, broilers, fryers and combination oven/steamers, the facility enables students to steam, poach, roast, broil, and bake simultaneously.

Shields Music Scholarship Awards

Frederick Community College and the George L. Shields Foundation are pleased to offer annually Shields Music Scholarship Awards in the following categories:
 
  • Children with prior or current experience studying privately with a music instructor: (ages 6-18)
  • Children who have no prior private musical instruction: (ages 6-18)
  • Entering college freshmen majoring in music at FCC:
 
Students at FCC majoring in music beyond the freshman year are eligible for 2nd-year Grant Awards.

For information and applications.
 
Students will be able to:
  1. Identify, apply and discuss major concepts, principles, and theories related to human development by completing one or more papers and projects based on observation of children and adolescents.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of curriculum approaches and effective methods of teaching and learning through creating and presenting lesson plans applicable to course topics.
  3. Compose and collect artifacts (i.e. papers, projects) for current and future portfolios and participate in activities (i.e. case study experiences, interviews) to demonstrate how students differ in their development and approaches to learning.
  4. Demonstrate characteristics of future teachers by behaving professionally at events and experiences both on and off campus, utilizing college-level skills in course assignments, etc.
  5. Develop an initial knowledge base in future teaching content areas by successfully completing coursework in relevant areas.
Students will be able to:
  1. Create two-dimensional production and architectural drawings using basic AutoCAD commands. Print/plot to scale using model and layout space. Use layers to organize and separate information.
  2. Create pictorial views and three dimensional drawings. Create multiview drawings from three dimensional models.
  3. Describe and recognize the basic features and uses of additional CAD software systems, including AutoDesk Architecture, Revit, Civil 3D, and Micro station.
  4. Create architectural sketches, drawings, and models.
  5. Prepare house plans in AutoCAD and plot drawings in paper space.
  6. Describe the basic properties and uses of materials used in the construction process and evaluate appropriate methods of installation of construction materials. Illustrate the testing methods used to evaluate the performance and installation of construction materials.
  7. Create and revise civil drawings.
  8. Demonstrate proficiency in selected elective areas of CAD and construction.
  9. Demonstrate awareness of general education concepts - writing, math, science, social science, communications, and PE/health.
Frederick Community College’s Physical Education program offers a certificate option for students interested in a career in personal training. Students who earn their certification may work in fitness centers and gyms conducting exercise classes and assisting people one-on-one through personalized plans to improve the client’s fitness level.

FCC’s fitness/personal trainer program prepares students to take certification testing through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) upon completion of the instructional content. The NASM certification program includes a specified curriculum and requires an internship, as well as passing the certification exam.

On the job, personal trainers:
  • assess fitness levels and establish training goals and personalized programs for clients,
  • work independently and with co-workers to help diverse clients improve their fitness levels,
  • submit and maintain appropriate records, and
  • fulfill duties assigned by the health club employer.

In addition to having knowledge of anatomy and physiology, and kinesiology, personal trainers must be able to communicate effectively, maintain professional standards, and abide by the NASM code of ethics.

Students may enter the workforce directly after earning the certificate. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Fitness Trainer/Aerobics Instructor field will grow 29.4 percent from 2009-2018. Fitness Trainers are on the Bureau’s list of “the 30 fastest-growing occupations, 2008-2018.”
Accounting A.A.S.
Students will be able to:
  • Apply the steps in the accounting cycle to record accounting transactions and adjustments, and create financial statements according to generally accepted accounting principles.
  • Construct a bank reconciliation and develop related adjusting accounting entries (books to bank statement).
  • Create financial statements and record transactions/adjustments utilizing accounting software.
  • Create payroll functions for a business entity.
  • Construct spreadsheets to report financial performance and project financial estimates.
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a business environment.
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of accounting principles and their application as they relate to financial statements for all businesses, ranging from sole proprietorships to corporations.
  • Apply managerial accounting concepts to solve business financial problems.
  • Demonstrate awareness of general education concepts - writing, math, science, social science, communications, and PE/health.

Business Accounting Certificate
Students will be able to:
  1. Apply the steps in the accounting cycle to record accounting transactions and adjustments, and create financial statements according to generally accepted accounting principles.
  2. Create financial statements and record accounting transactions & adjustments utilizing accounting software.
  3. Create payroll functions for a business entity.
  4. Construct spreadsheets to report financial performance and project financial estimates.
  5. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of accounting principles and their application as they relate to financial statements.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in a business environment.

Computerized Accounting Certificate
Students will be able to:
  1. Apply the steps in the accounting cycle to record accounting transactions and adjustments, and create financial statements according to generally accepted accounting principles.
  2. Create financial statements and record accounting transactions and adjustments utilizing accounting software.
  3. Create payroll functions for a business entity.
  4. Construct spreadsheets to report financial performance and project financial estimates.
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
BLD 101–Introduction to Building Trades 3
BLD 109–Fundamental of HVACR 4
BLD 110–Controls for HVACR 3
Total 10
Students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate behavior that reflects integrity, supports objectivity, and fosters trust in the respiratory care profession and its professionals as identified by employer survey.
  2. Recommend and perform procedures to maintain the airway, remove secretions, and assure ventilation and tissue oxygenation.
  3. Perform a full physical assessment and provide safe respiratory care by modifying therapy or making recommendations for changes in therapy based on the patient’s response to their current therapeutic regimen.
  4. Promote disease prevention and wellness by educating patients on the proper use and care of respiratory equipment.
  5. Identify educational opportunities to improve and maintain their professional competence and credentials.
  6. Provide care without discrimination on any basis, with respect for the rights and dignity of all individuals.
  7. Obtain the CRT and RRT professional credentials in order to practice respiratory care.
  8. Participate as an active member of the American Association for Respiratory Care.
Students will be able to:
  1. Students will apply and transfer their ASL skills at local Deaf community events.
  2. Students will produce a class project or presentation using ASL.
  3. Students will demonstrate their ASL skills in communicating with native ASL users.
  4. Students will employ ASL skills during their internship in a signing environment.
  5. Students will create a plan to master toe ASLPI (ASL Proficiency Interview).
  6. Students will be able to distinguish the language and culture between Deaf and hearing Americans.
  7. Students will develop basic skills and knowledge about the Deaf community and apply that skill and knowledge in higher education or training programs to be ASL interpreters or Educators of Deaf children.
Students will be able to:
  1. Articulate central themes of the discipline
  2. Apply and demonstrate entry-level bioprocessing skills and techniques
  3. Demonstrate discipline-specific scientific inquiry.
  4. Communicate discipline-specific knowledge
  5. Integrate discipline specific technology.
  6. Demonstrate appropriate quantitative skills.
  7. Analyze the role of bioprocessing technology in society.

In support of the Department of Homeland Security and FEMA goals, the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) offers self-paced online Independent Study (IS) courses free of charge to individuals with emergency management responsibilities.

As a proud FEMA partner, Frederick Community College (FCC) awards college credit to individuals upon successful completion of FEMA IS courses meeting college rigor.  Course credits may be applied toward an academic credential including an Emergency Management degree, Certificate, or Letter of Recognition and often satisfy professional development requirements set by various employers, departments and agencies.

 

Converting FEMA IS Courses to College Credit

 
1. Review FCC Semester Date Information below

  • Students are responsible for confirming that college credit will be received within the desired academic semester
2. Complete FEMA-EMI-IS program courses at training.fema.gov/is/crslist.aspx
  • Prior to enrollment, ensure that program requirements align with desired student outcomes
  • Select courses that are available for college credit
  • Questions? Contact FEMA at 301-447-1200 or email emstudy@jacobs.com
3. Convert coursework and order college credit at em-study.com
  • Credit conversion cost is $82 per credit (effective 6/1/16)
  • Orders are submitted to FCC on the student’s behalf
  • Questions? Contact FEMA at 301-447-1200 or email emstudy@jacobs.com
4. Receive an FCC transcript reflecting college credit
  • A student record is created and/or updated with courses posted as one (1) college credit with a ‘P’ for Passing (‘P’ is equivalent to a grade of ‘C’ or better and does not factor into calculating a student’s GPA).
  • Two separate emails are sent to the student with processing/status updates: the first is sent upon receipt of the order and the second is sent when transcripts have been shipped
  • Allow at least four weeks for processing – rush service is not available
  • Questions? Contact FCC at 301-624-2854 or by email

 

Semester Dates and Ordering Information

 
Fall 2016 Semester (8/22/16-1/22/17)
Step 3 must be completed between 8/22/16 and 1/22/17 to receive credits within the 2016 fall semester.

 
Summer 2016 Semester (6/6/16-8/21/16)
Step 3 must have been completed between 6/6/16 and 8/21/16 to receive credits within the 2016 summer semester.
 
Spring 2016 Semester (1/25/16-6/5/16)
Step 3 must have been completed between 1/25/16 and 6/5/16 to receive credits within the 2016 spring semester.

  1. Demonstrate the internalization of the Neuman Systems Model as a framework for providing nursing care at the generalist level to client systems across the lifespan and with any degree of alteration in wellness.

  2. Prioritize nursing care for client systems experiencing stressors from the internal and external environments.

  3. Use critical thinking skills to assist the client system to attain, maintain, and retain client system stability.

  4. Provide safe, competent prevention/interventions utilizing evidence based practice and the nursing process.

  5. Therapeutically communicate with the client system during primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention/interventions.

  6. Employ effective oral and written communication skills with members of the health care team while considering the influence of one’s own internal and external stressors.

  7. Provide client system education to strengthen normal and flexible lines of defense.

  8. Apply legal and ethical standards of nursing while caring for client systems who are retaining, attaining, and/or maintaining the goal of system stability.

  9. Reflect on the impact of one’s own behaviors, attitudes, and values in helping the client system deal with physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual stressors.

  10. Demonstrate internalization of professional workforce behaviors.

  11. Articulate the value of continuing education, responsibility for one’s own learning, and professional organization membership.

  12. Delegate care of client systems to appropriately prepared health care personnel.

The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation.

Specific duties for surgical technologists may include:

  • Participates in small, team groups

  • Enjoys working with people

  • Works accurately under pressure and within time constraints

  • Communicates professionally and respectfully

  • Detail oriented

  • Exhibits prompt and consistent attendance

  • Demonstrates manual dexterity and technical skills

  • Accepts constructive criticism and learns from feedback

  • Applies standardized  principles and concepts related to surgery

  • Applies anatomy knowledge

  • Anticipates needs of the surgical team

  • Multitasks  while focusing on the needs of the surgical team

  • Opens sterile supplies and prepares the sterile surgical field

  • Assists team members to don sterile gowns and gloves

  • Prepares necessary equipment

  • Assists the patient to settle into an unfamiliar environment

  • Assists with patient positioning for the procedure

  • Assists team members to apply surgical and monitoring devices

  • Prepares the incision site

  • Counts instruments and sponges concurrently with the circulator

  • Verifies, prepares, and passes medications and solutions during the procedure

  • Handles sterile instruments, sponges, and suture

  • Utilizes  correct protocols for all tissue specimens

  • Assists with placement of surgical dressings at the end of the procedure

Early Childhood Development A.A.S.

Students will be able to:
  1. Identify, apply and discuss major concepts, principles and theories related to child development by completing one or more papers and projects based on observation of children.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate curriculum and materials for infancy to eight years old through creating and presenting lesson plans.
  3. Demonstrate characteristics of future teachers by behaving professionally at events and experiences both on and off campus, utilizing college-level skills in course assignments, etc.
  4. Synthesize their knowledge of the fundamentals and practices of early childhood development through a Directed Practicum/Internship experience.
  5. Communicate appropriate guidance and behavior modification techniques and theories through case studies and observations.
  6. Explain, identify and discuss duties of administrators of child care settings through one or more papers and projects.
  7. Generate resources on appropriate children’s literature based on in depth review.
  8. Explain and identify the major theories, historical roots and theorists in the field of early childhood education by completing one or more projects and papers.
  9. Develop a broader knowledge base by successfully completing coursework in general education courses.


Certificate Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:
  1. Identify, apply and discuss major concepts, principles and theories related to child development by completing one or more papers and projects based on observation of children.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate curriculum and materials for infancy to eight years old through creating and presenting lesson plans.
  3. Demonstrate characteristics of future teachers by behaving professionally at events and experiences both on and off campus, utilizing college-level skills in course assignments, etc.
  4. Synthesize knowledge of the fundamentals and practices of early childhood development through a Directed Practicum/Internship experience.
  5. Communicate appropriate guidance and behavior modification techniques and theories through case studies and observations.
  6. Explain, identify and discuss duties of administrators of child care settings through one or more papers and projects.
  7. Generate resources on appropriate children’s literature based on in depth review.
  8. Explain and identify the major theories, historical roots and theorists in the field of early childhood education by completing one or more projects and papers.
Gainful Employment Information


 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
CIS 101–Information Systems & Technology OR  
CIS 106 Object Design & Programming 3
CIS 111B–Microcomputer Software Applications: Database 3
CIS 111E–Microcomputer Software Applications: Spreadsheets 3
CIS 116R–Business Software Applications 3
Electives (Select 6 credits from any CIS Course) 6
Total 18
 
 
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.S. in Computer Science and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, please contact CIS Program Manager at ayao@frederick.edu or 301.846.2410.
  • Hood College – B.S. Computer Science

The Career & Transfer Center has a variety of print and electronic resources available to help with transfer planning. ARTSYS, a computerized articulation system created especially to help community college students transfer to Maryland four-year institutions is available, as well as College Source and College Board. College Source also allows students to view college catalogs from across the nation. For more information, visit the Career & Transfer Center, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, 301.846.2594.
Students will be able to:
1. Communications
Demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal communications with law enforcement staff and the general public. This may include:
  • effective communication skills in dealing with various types of people (e.g., hostile, angry, drunk, deranged, racist, etc.),
  • identification of non-language and language-style factors that contribute to a negative response from the public (e.g., profanity, spitting, disrespectful attitude, etc.), and
  • courteous, active listening.
2. Crisis Intervention
Apply concepts, principles and practices of the criminal justice system to affect successful resolution to potentially and commonly-encountered policing situations. This may include:
  • identifying basic psychological responses of victims and
  • calming and controlling a distraught person.

3. Principles of Law
Demonstrate ability to identify a given crime, crime classification and section number utilizing the Annotated Code of Maryland and/or the Digest of Criminal Laws and knowing the conditions under which certain procedures are appropriate. This may include:
  • subpoena procedures, 
  • booking procedures, and 
  • advising a person of his/her rights.

4. Report Writing
Demonstrate effective written communications. This may include:
  • preparing complete field and interview notes, and
  • preparing in-depth narrative reports necessary for various legal organizations and legal proceedings. Students will interpret results of wellness, fitness and nutrition evaluations.

1. What is a medical assistant?

A medical assistant (MA) is a member of a physician office or urgent care team. The MA splits the time between administrative duties, such as scheduling, billing and coding and clinical duties such as history and physical intake, vitals, injections and patient education.
 

2. What is the pay rate like?

The rate for the Frederick area is $11.00-$15.00 per hour.
 

3.  Can I get a job quickly as a Medical Assistant? With Benefits?

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics lists Medical Assistant as one of the fastest growing professions. It is expected to experience a 35% growth by the year 2016. The number of people in the U.S. who are 65 or older is expected to double in the next 25 years. This could mean a huge increase in demand for the healthcare industry. An MA may be hired as a Full time position with benefits or as a part time position.
 

4.  Will I get hired at Externship site?

Some students have been hired at the extern site, however this is not a guarantee.
 

5. How long does it take to complete the program?

The certificate for Medical Assistant can be obtained in as little as 10 months for a full time student. The certificate for Health Care Practice Management can be obtained in as little as 6 months for a full time student.
 

6. When can I take the National Certification for Medical Assistants Exam?

Assisting Program the graduate is eligible for national certification through NCCT. The test is given once a month upon graduation, on campus, in the Testing Center. NCCT is an independent, third party organization that has certified more than 200,000 individuals by examination throughout the U.S. since 1989. NCCT examinations are job-related, criterion-referenced tests designed to assess a candidate’s performance against redetermined standards. These standards are created by a role delineation process (a job analysis survey) that insures that NCCT standards meet the expectations of all stakeholders.
 

7. What if I do not know much about computers?

The support courses in the Health Care Practice Management certification are: Information Systems and Technology, Medical Office Applications, and Electronic Health Records.
 

8. Is this a program I can work around my family life with?

This program can be taken in a full time or part time status. There are also many courses in the program that are offered as a hybrid or an online course.
 

9. Is financial aid available?  

Yes, to those who qualify. We have a Financial Aid office to answer any questions you may have.
 

10. Is the Medical Assisting field over-populated or crowded?  

No, good assistants are in demand.
 

11. Will the Medical Assisting Program give me the skills to be a desirable candidate for employment when I have completed the course?

Yes, the program offers knowledge needed along with hands-on laboratory skills and placement in an extern-site.
 

12. Do the students have a high success rate of graduating and being hired.  

Yes, the rate for both is good and seems to be improving very consistently.
 

13. What are some of the duties of a Medical Assistant? 

You are instructed to:
  • Communicate with patients, doctors, supervisors, peers
  • Record vital signs
  • Administer injections and EKGs
  • Assist with physical examinations
  • Manage medical records
  • Perform routine laboratory and diagnostic tests
  • Assist with minor surgical procedures
  • Increase awareness of Cultural diversities
 

14. Will I need to purchase additional textbooks for this program for MDA 101,102,104,201, 202 and 204 Clinical Classes?

The Large Textbook, Workbook and Handbook you purchase before MDA101 will carry you through MDA101, 102, 201 and 202 classes. MDA 104 and 204 are both part of your Clinical Externship time in a real-life office. You simply get your evaluations completed and do the work of a medical assistant during this time.
 

15.  Are there any recommendations regarding reading the “really thick” MDA textbook?

Yes, we recommend you go to the back of the chapter you wish to study first, where you will
  • find a “summary” that gives you an overview of the material you will find in the chapter. This helps relieve the “overwhelmed” feeling.
  • Many students prefer to keep this textbook as a reference and feel free to HIGHLIGHT important information.
  • Then read the chapter. Write bold face words if you wish/page#
  • Then complete the workbook. Some students find it helpful to write the text page number where they found the answer next to the workbook question. Any unusually difficult questions can be brought to class lecture.
 

16. Why must we begin reading and completing the workbook BEFORE the first day of class?

We have so much wonderful information and excellent hands-on opportunities in Medical Assistant Skills to discuss, we can not waste any class time! Our students are well known in the Frederick area as being very well prepared- 80% of the last graduating class was hired BEFORE graduation.
 

17.  What documentation is required to complete the MDA101 Competency Folder in order to move on to MDA102?

You must turn in PHYSICAL Forms, HEALTHCARE PROVIDER CPR card copy, record of current PPD (TB Test) and Immunization Record/ Bloodwork Titre including Hepatitis B shot #1 out of three. This information insures that you are protected and fit for working as a medical assistant.
 

18. What kind of interesting things will students study in these classes generally?

  • MDA 101- vitals, ethics and law, and working with patients.
  • MDA102-”small needles” for example, injections, glucometers, Hemoglobin, EKG and strep testing and more!
  • THEN MDA 104 begins your EXTERNSHIP in a real office while you finish:
  • MDA201-phlebotomy, urine testing and more!
  • MDA202-Re-visit anatomy and body systems, more phlebotomy and injections experience and prepare for national certification!
 

19.  What is the difference between a Medical Assistant and a Nurse?

A very basic answer is that CMAs work more with testing and patient care BEFORE diagnosis, assisting a physician on site as the physician investigates the clues to the patient’s health problems.
Nurses monitor and care for patients without a physician on site on their OWN license. Sometimes we see nurses in offices because although MAs can give meds when ordered and place an IV in the State of MD, we may not hook up an IV. Nurses are not trained in some of the testing methods we do.
CMAs may work with x-rays under supervision of a physician, but may not “push the Button” unless certified in Radiology. You must make yourself aware of the laws in whatever state you choose to practice!
 

20. How does certification work?

  1. The student completes a medical assistant program and applies for graduation. Not certified yet!
  2. Once the coursework and Externship of 160 hours is complete the student must register online and pay discounted “student fee” for the NCCT exam. The link for this is on your blackboard site. Passing this means you are CERTIFIED to work in every state, although laws vary as far as scope of practice, but you have a professional level of knowledge and ability and everyone knows it. There is a pay incentive associated with Certification as well. The student must send a program completion certificate from the MDA Program to NCCT, after which NCCT will send NATIONAL CERTIFICATE.
  3. The student may attend the MDA PROGRAM Pinning Ceremony in the month of July following completion of graduation requirements to celebrate with classmates.
  4. The student may attend the FCC College Graduation Ceremony in May following the completion of program.
  5. To remain certified, you must complete 12 hours of CE (Continuing Education) credit each year for 5 years (60 total) before it is necessary to take the certification exam again, which you may do here at FCC Testing Center again.
 

21. Are all MAs certified? And are there any Professional organizations I should know about?

There are MAs working without certification and with experience may be making good pay, however they may only be trained in ONE type of office. HOWEVER, new changes coming out from Medicare now indicate that it may be requirement in the near future to be certified by a certification body to prove that the MA may be competent to a professional level. New MAs with National Certification jump to the top of the list when Office managers are hiring, because they have the training and some experience (externship hours) to show on their resume.

The AAMA-American Association of Medical Assistants (who also certifies MAs) is an association you may join as a student and receive a magazine called CMA TODAY which includes evolving changes and updates, if you wish. This is an option. The AAMA offers Liability Insurance, etc.
 
 
 
 
Prepares students for employment as a manager in the hospitality industry.
 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
BU 273–Business Communication 3
BU 227–Principles of Management 3
HOS 110–Introduction to Hospitality Management 3
HOS 216– Food and Beverage Operations  or
HOS 219–Foundations of Lodging Management
3
HOS 218–Hospitality Information Systems 3
HOS 121–Sanitation and Food Safety 2
Total 26
 
 
Program Objectives
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of graphic communications (e.g. architectural drawings and specifications) for construction.
  • Students will have an understanding of the methods used in the construction of commercial and/or residential construction projects covering procedures, equipment, materials and techniques.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of the complete construction process which includes effective planning, scheduling, and control of the overall construction project. Students will understand construction safety principles and practices, and be familiar with related federal/state/county codes.
  •  
Introduces students to the business environment; including management, human resources, marketing, planning, accounting, and computing.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements
 
BU 103–Introduction to Business 3
ACCT 101–Principles of Accounting I 3
CIS 101–Information Systems and Technology  3
Total 9
 
The nursing program offers a day and an evening/weekend option. To ensure appropriate and adequate clinical experiences, clinical rotations can be scheduled at any time based on clinical agency availability and may not be limited to the option selected. When applying to the nursing program, students should be prepared for all possible clinical schedules available for their designated course(s) each semester. 
Prepares students who already have some computer and programming skills to operate and administer a database management system.

 
Course  Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
CIS 230–Database Management Systems 3
CIS 232–Database Administration 3
Total 6

Human Services AA


Students will be able to:
  1. Describe the origins of social work and the other human service professions and discuss the current issues in the field through journal writing.
  2. Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical research to understand individual behavior across the life span and apply in case examples.
  3. Identify and evaluate the major theories and techniques of social and clinical intervention applied in case examples.
  4. Demonstrate proficiency in basic helping skills by conducting a series of videotapes helping interviews.
  5. Apply critical thinking skills to professional human service practices.
  6. Understand the Codes of Ethics of the major professional organizations that regulate the human services and demonstrate the ability to comply with these standards in volunteer and internship experiences in human service agencies.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to practice multicultural awareness and sensitivity in a human service agency volunteer or internship experience.
  8. Articulate their identity as a human service professional and formulate a plan for on-going professional development in reflective papers.
 

1. What do ST students say about the ST program and the career?

  • “Thanks to you and the rest of the instructors. I walked away from this first week so excited to begin a new chapter in my life. The thing that impressed me so much was the kindness that you and everyone else showed toward all of the students. Your willingness to help and to see us succeed is truly a great gift that all of you have given us!”

  • “Do you love to help people? Have you always wanted to enter the healthcare field without attending school for numerous years?  If you answered “yes” to these questions then become a Surgical Technologist!

  • You will be a vital part of the surgical team and make a difference in the patient’s quality of life.  Surgical technologists do so much; they are the surgeon’s foundation and support.”

  • “The surgical technologist is the backbone of the operating room team.  They prepare, maintain, and display exceptional organizational skills, and demonstrate a positive attitude and exceptional people skills.  Along with the entire OR team, the ST places the patient’s health and well-being as the number one priority.” 

  • “Surgical technologists work as part of a team.  They must be proficient at multi-tasking and must remain calm in highly stressful situations.  Obtaining certification in this field gives you the opportunity to be part of an exciting career path.”   

2. What types of surgical technology programs are offered at FCC?

  • FCC offers two surgical technology program options.

  • Certificate in Surgical Technology.  Students can receive a certificate in surgical technology in about one year for those meeting basic college skill requirements.

  • Associate in Applied Science degree. Students can obtain an AAS degree by completing a series of general education courses and the surgical technology courses. The AAS degree can generally be completed in two years.

3. What are the prerequisites?

  • Complete all courses with a “C” grades or higher which will  be applied towards  the ST Certificate or the A.A.S. degree 

  • Complete BI103 and BI 104 Anatomy and Physiology.

  • Complete MDA 108 or MDA 109 Medical Terminology 

  • Complete one CMSP Communications course selection.  CMSP 107 Career Communications is recommended.

  • Students completing the AAS degree in ST may use ST 101 Introduction to Surgical Technology to meet the FCC cultural competency requirement.

  • Participate in Job shadowing with a surgical technologist in the OR.   Refer to question # 4. 


4. Does job shadowing help students decide if ST is a career path for them?

  • Yes. Ninety-five percent of all students stated that observing a surgical technologist in the operating room was extremely helpful in validating their desire to pursue this profession.  A few students have withdrawn their application to the program as a result of participating in job shadowing.  The rationale given was the ST’s job was not as expected; it was too demanding or stressful.
  • You may arrange a job shadowing experience through the education department at participating hospitals, or through an online hospital application process.  Proof of immunity to communicable diseases and completion of privacy training may be required.


• Refer to the FCC Job Shadowing Verification Form for program applicants. http://www.frederick.edu/download/programs/JobShadowingVerificationforClinicalSites2012-2013.pdf 


5. Can I transfer courses from other colleges into the ST program?

  • Yes. First register with FCC and complete a separate web-based ST program application by the due date.  Both applications are free. 

  • Change your major to the ST certificate or the AAS degree

  • Courses taken at other colleges may be submitted for evaluation by our registrar.  Please send official transcripts from each college where you completed the courses; grades must be a “C” or higher. 

  • Your transcript will be evaluated and “points” will be assigned in a program point system.  Refer to the Surgical Technology Competitive Admissions Point Scale.  http://www.frederick.edu/download/programs/STpointscale(revised%209-2012).pdf 

6. When do ST classes begin?

  • The clinical portion of the program begins twice a year in the fall and in the spring.

  • The spring, 2015 start date, is a new addition to the ST program.  

  • Certificate and AAS degree students attend the clinical portion of the program simultaneously.  

7. How many semesters are in the clinical program?

  • There are three semesters in the ST clinical program. 

  • Each semester includes clinical hours, or scheduled time in the operating room, at our clinical affiliate sites.  

8. Where are the clinical sites located?

  • There are over 20 clinical sites utilized in the Maryland-Pennsylvania-Virginia-West Virginia region. Program officials aim to place students geographically; however, requests cannot be guaranteed. Plan to add travel time onto each clinical day, which typically begins at 6:45 a.m.

9. Are there any additional costs for the program, other than tuition?

  • Yes. There are additional costs.
  • Use scholarships and loans in the FCC bookstore to purchase textbooks, ST lab packs, and ST scrub attire.  Cost approximately $625.00

  • ST courses have fees associated with them for pre-clinical screening: background check, fingerprinting, and drug screening. Cost approximately $200.00; course fees also include the CST examination fee. Cost approximately $250.00

  • Schedule an appointment with your healthcare practitioner for pre-clinical screening.  Obtain permission to perform the duties of a student surgical technology, and obtain proof of immunity to communicable diseases.  Cost to the student will be for the office visit, any additional immunizations, and for laboratory services.

  • Provide proof of a certificate in CPR for the HealthCare Provider from the American Heart Association.  Cost to the student will be course registration fees. 

10.  Can I w​ork full-time while attending the ST program?  

  • A majority of ST students do not work full time. 

  • Current students overwhelmingly recommend against full-time employment.  

  • Most classroom sessions and all clinical rotations are scheduled during the day time hours. 

  • Clinical rotations are scheduled between 6:45 a.m.–3:00 p.m. and travel time is additional.  

  • For those students who are currently employed as a surgical technologist, you may be able to negotiate with your employer so that your work commitment corresponds with your program commitments.  

  • The clinical component of the program shall be educational in nature, and the student shall not be substituted for paid staff personnel during the clinical component of the program (September, 2013). 

11. How much study time is involved?  

  • On average, students must plan on spending approximately 5 hours per week out of the classroom studying for each 3-credit course.  Study time equates to about two hours for every one hour in class.

  • Surgical technology is a career program.  You are required to demonstrate competency in ST skills and you must practice safely in the operating room setting with surgical patients, surgeons, and nurses.  You must pass each component in the course to advance in the program.

  • ST courses contain lecture classes, skill simulation laboratories, instrument identification sessions, and clinical operating room assignments. 

12. What are the benefits of passing the certification examination in surgical technology?

  • Students sit for the web-based national certification examination in surgical technology in our testing center and prior to graduation.  Those who pass the examination may use the credential “CST” behind their name (certified surgical technologist.)

  • While passing this examination is not a pre-requisite to employment in many hospitals, it provides an advantage to the new graduate when competing for job openings.  Once hired, most hospitals award additional salary to certified surgical technologists.  

13. Are there ST jobs in our area?

  • Yes. During the past ten years, 75%- 95% of our program graduates have obtained employment in our geographical region which includes Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Virginia. 

  • Graduates who seek employment within a 50-mile radius are most successful.

  • When openings exist, our graduates are offered employment by their clinical site managers. 

14. What type of jobs have graduates from FCC obtained?

  • Our graduates are employed full- or part-time in main operating rooms, surgery centers, physician’s offices, materials management departments, surgical product companies, and surgical technology education.

Emergency Management AAS

Upon successful completion of the program, Emergency Management students are able to:
  • Differentiate organizational roles and responsibilities of government agencies during all phases of the Emergency Management (EM) cycle.
  • Navigate multi-disciplinary organizational structures to identify local, state and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Resources.
  • Collect, analyze and synthesize information to identify possible outcomes of a potential or actual event and recommend solutions.
  • Identify a variety of EM problems and develop an inventory of possible solutions to those problems based on established EM techniques, successful historical solutions and the cost/benefit of each option.
  • Provide organized, clear and concise EM information.
  • Utilize specific EM terminology and concepts in a manner appropriate to professional EM analysis and problem solving.
  • Identify leadership techniques and change management models for effective EM.
In addition to the tuition and fees charged by the the college, students should plan on the following expenses to complete the program:
 
Stethoscope $70
Lab Coat $30
Scrub Top & Pants $40
Shoes $50
Wrist Watch $30
Books $1500
Travel (commuting to and from clinical sites costs may vary) $2000
CPR $65
Vaccinations $500
Exam Review $365
CRT Exam $200
Background Check $70
 


*These are only estimates and are subject to change. 
Students planning to transfer and complete a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting are advised to follow the FCC Business Administration Transfer AA degree requirements due to course transfer acceptance requirements at most transfer institutions (except at schools as noted below). FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Accounting and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
  • University of Maryland University College, Main campus & Universities at Shady Grove/Hagerstown–B.S. Accounting (Business Administration minor)
  • Capella University - BS Business, Business Administration
Manufacturing of biological products for use in industry and research is a cutting-edge industry in Frederick County and nation-wide. Rapid expansion and growth of the local biotechnology industry is fueling the demand for qualified process operators, providing employment opportunities in a field that offers employer-supported career development and continued education possibilities.

FCC’s Bioprocessing Technology program prepares individuals for employment in the local biotech industry. The program emphasizes science, communication and critical-thinking skills, manufacturing technologies and laboratory environmental health and safety. 

Students work in small collaborative groups to apply current manufacturing techniques, while using problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Students learn industry-specific skills required in bioprocessing technology jobs, such as how to:
  • Perform upstream bioprocessing techniques to culture cells and microorganisms to create a bulk bio-product for research and industry,
  • Perform downstream bioprocessing techniques to separate and refine bulk bio-products into a suitable form for end use in industry,
  • Manufacture assays for diagnostic testing for research, 
  • Implement cell culture, fermentation, separation, purification and sterilization techniques in a laboratory setting, and
  • Understand and apply basic laboratory skills, documentation practices and aseptic techniques to monitor production, maintain workplace safety and prevent contamination of bio-products.
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Construction Management & Supervision and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471 or the Program Manager at 301.846.2611.
  • Pennsylvania College of Technology – B.A. Construction Management
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore – B.S. Construction Management Technology
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Main Campus & Universities at Shady Grove–B.S. Construction Management Technology
Note: Some of the above articulation agreements may not result in transfer of all credits.
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institution for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Paralegal and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
 
  • University of Maryland University College – B.S. Legal Studies.
Students who achieve the Fitness/Personal Trainer certificate have a strong foundation for further coursework in physical education related fields. This certificate can be used to meet the elective requirements of FCC’s Associate of Arts degree in general studies.

With the A.A. degree, students can transfer to one of the many institutions with which FCC has articulation (transfer) agreements. These agreements assist students in a smooth transition from one institution to the other.

For more information on schools that have articulation agreements with FCC, visit the Counseling & Advising Office, Enrollment Services Building, J201, or call 301.846.2471.
Gainful Employment

Course
Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
BLD 120 - Welding Symbols & Blueprint Reading 2
BLD 121–Introduction to Welding 4
BLD 122–Advanced Welding: SMAW 4
BU 274–Customer Relations 3
Electives*  
BLD 125–Advanced Welding: GTAW or  
BLD 127–Advanced Welding: GMAW or   
BLD 128–Advanced Welding: SMAW 4G 3
*Students should check with an advisor before 
selecting their electives
 
   
Total 16
The Associate in Applied Science degree in Architectural Computer-Aided Design is for students who want to work as architectural CAD designers/drafters. It is not a transfer program for students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in architecture or engineering. Students interested in transfer options for a bachelor’s degree in architecture or engineering should contact an FCC counselor about transfer options in these areas.

For students who complete the A.A.S. degree in Architectural Computer-Aided Design, FCC has an articulation (transfer) agreement with:
  • University of Maryland University College – B.S. Management Studies.

For more information, visit the Career & Transfer Center, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, 301.846.2594.

Q. How long does it take to complete the associate degree and certificate programs?

A: The associate degree program takes four semesters (2-years) full-time, including an internship, and the certificate programs take 2 semesters (1-year) full-time.

Q: When can I start classes at FCC?

A: There are two enrollment periods for Culinary Arts and Hospitality courses:
  • fall (late August/) and
  • spring (late January)

Q: How many credits and what classes should I register for my first semester?

A: New culinary students should take a minimum of seven (7) credits by registering for HOS 112 Food Preparation I (3), HOS 113 Food Preparation II (3) and HOS 121 Sanitation & Food Safety (1).

Q: Can I transfer credit for courses taken from another school?

A: Because of the unique nature of our curriculum, only select course work can be considered for transfer credit for culinary courses. Eligibility will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis during the advisement process.
Note: Students who have successfully completed academic credit for college level Math and English courses can waive pre-requisites for HOS 112 Food Preparation II and HOS 110 Introduction to Hospitality.

Q: How do I apply for Financial Aid?

A: Contact the Financial Aid office 301.864.2480 and file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov. FCC’s Federal Code is 002071.

FCC financial aid representatives can work with you to determine your eligibility for grants, loans, and need- and merit-based scholarships. FCC offers a variety of scholarships, and we encourage you to apply for them. The Culinary Arts newsletter includes information about additional industry-based scholarship opportunities.
Nuclear medicine technologists operate equipment that detects and maps radioactive trace materials put into a patient’s body to create diagnostic images. The images are produced on a computer screen or film for diagnosis by the healthcare team. Nuclear medicine can be used to obtain information about the structure and function of virtually every major organ system of the body.

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging modality used in determining the presence and severity of cancers, neurological conditions, and cardiovascular disease. It is currently the most effective way to check for cancer recurrences.

PET images demonstrate the chemistry of organs and other tissues such as tumors. A radiopharmaceutical, such as FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), which includes both sugar (glucose) and a radionuclide (a radioactive element) that gives off signals, is injected into the patient, and its emissions are measured by a PET scanner.

CT uses X-ray and computer to obtain a cross-sectional image of the human body. When X-rays are irradiated on the human body, some of the rays are absorbed and some pass through the body to produce an image.  In plain X-ray imaging, the film directly absorbs penetrated X-rays. In CT scanning, an electronic device called a "detector array" absorbs the penetrated X-rays, measures the X-ray amount, and transmits the data to a computer system. A sophisticated computer system, in turn, calculates and analyzes data from each detector in each level, and finally reconstructs multiple, two-dimensional, cross-sectional images.

Prepares students as entry-level nuclear medicine technologists in a specialized area of diagnostic imaging which includes both body structure and function. Nuclear medicine technologists perform procedures to assist physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Recently the nuclear medicine field has expanded to include molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET), and fusion imaging using hybrid scanners, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT.  In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted student will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum

The program combines scientific research techniques with hands-on application in classroom and clinical environments. Students learn from imaging professionals who bring real-world experience to the classroom.
 
Graduates may work in hospitals, physicians’ offices and diagnostic imaging centers. Upon completion students will earn an AAS in Nuclear Medicine Technology and a Certificate in Computed Tomography.   Graduates will be qualified to take the national certification exams for nuclear medicine technology and the post primary certification in Computed Tomography. The combination of focus meets the expanding needs of nuclear medicine technology that includes dual modality imaging.  The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT).
 
FCC’s Nuclear Medicine Technology program teaches students:
  • skills for patient care,
  • diagnostic and therapeutic procedures,
  • radiation safety,
  • radiopharmacy,
  • instrumentation,
  • quality control,
  • manipulation of clinical data, and
  • how to perform phlebotomy.

Program Goals

FCC will provide students with gratifying learning experiences and career opportunities in a learning environment that will enable them:
  • the ability to competently perform responsibilities regarding patient care, quality control, diagnostic procedures, radiopharmaceuticals, radionuclide therapies, in vivo diagnostic testing, in vitro diagnostic testing, transmission imaging and radiation safety.
  • critical thinking skills essential in the practice of nuclear medicine technology.
  • a high level of ethical and professional standards.
  • the ability to facilitate the needs of the community to understand nuclear medicine technology.
  • effective communication techniques required to interact successfully with patients and other members of the health care team.
  • values for a commitment to lifelong learning.
  • the ability to represent cultural diversity.
 

Program Benefits

  • Study in small cohort of 13 students
  • Learn from imaging professionals who bring real-world experience to the classroom
  • Combine scientific research techniques with hands-on application
  • Graduate with the potential to be dual certified 
 

Skills You Will Learn

Knowledge in learning activities associated with
  • Patient care
  • Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures
  • Radiation safety
  • Radiopharmacy
  • Instrumentation
  • Quality control
  • Manipulation of clinical data
  • Performing phlebotomy


Skills You Will Need

  • Communication skills sufficient to teach others, explain procedures, interact with others and convey information in writing
  • Provide services with compassion and respect
  • Provide care without discrimination
  • Confidentiality in accordance with state and federal regulations
  • Compliance with laws and regulations
  • Ability to recognize emergency situations and take appropriate actions
  • Emotional stability to assume responsibility for actions, provide patients with emotional support, adapt to environmental stress, and monitor own emotions
 

Job Shadowing

Job shadowing is a short-term experience designed to give students an up-close look at how an employee or group of workers do their jobs. All applicants must document at least four hours of shadowing/observation in nuclear medicine technology, prior to or concurrent with application to the program. Please contact Michele Tertel for a list of preferred sites to complete your clinical shadowing.
Culinary Skills Certificate Program – Learning Outcomes
Students will be able to:
  1. Produce multiple food products in a timely manner while demonstrating proficiency in both professional cooking and baking techniques.
  2. Demonstrate food production and customer service skills in both kitchen and dining room.
  3. Recognize ingredients from and perform cooking techniques associated with different regional, ethnic and international cuisines.
  4. Pass the NRAEF Food Protection Managers ServSafe™ examination and demonstrate industry standards in sanitation, safety, and personal hygiene.
  5. Exhibit interpersonal skills and respect in the treatment of colleagues and patrons.

Hospitality Management Certificate Program – Learning Outcomes
Students will be able to:
  1. Calculate and/or adjust recipe yields, ingredient and recipe costs, and menu cost using at least two different pricing methods, considering fixed and labor costs.
  2. Analyze the nutritional composition of a recipe and be able to modify and prepare dishes meeting recognized nutritional guidelines.
  3. Exhibit knowledge of traditional management theory, leadership and supervisory roles in the hospitality industry.
  4. Pass the NRAEF Food Protection Managers ServSafe™ examination and demonstrate industry standards in sanitation, safety, and personal hygiene.
  5. Exhibit interpersonal skills and respect in the treatment of colleagues and patrons.

Culinary Arts and Supervision A.A.S. Degree Program – Learning Outcomes
Students will be able to:
  1. Accomplish all of the Learning Outcomes for both the Culinary Skills Certificate Program and the Hospitality Supervision Certificate Program (see above)
Frederick Community College’s Architectural Computer-Aided Design (CAD) program provides students the necessary education to pursue employment as an architectural drafter/designer. Employers prefer applicants who have completed training after high school at a technical institute, community college, or four-year college or university.

Architectural CAD designers/drafters:
  • Operate computer-aided drafting equipment to produce designs, working drawings, charts, forms and records;
  • Draw rough and detailed scale plans for foundations, buildings, and structures based on preliminary concepts, sketches, engineering calculations, specification sheets and other data;
  • Lay out and plan interior room arrangements for buildings using computer-assisted drafting (CAD) software; and
  • Obtain and assemble data to complete architectural designs and visit job sites to compile measurements as necessary.
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
BLD 121–Introduction to Welding 4
BLD 122–Advanced Welding: SMAW 4
Total 8
For students seeking transfer opportunities, FCC is proud to present articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Emergency Management. 
  • American Public University System (APUS)- B.A Emergency and Disaster
  • Capella University (CU) -  B.S. Public Safety
  • Charter Oak State College (COSC)–Public Safety Administration Concentration
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Kansas Wesleyan University
  • Northwestern State University of Louisiana (NSU) - B.S. Unified Public Safety Administration : Emergency Management Administration Concentration
  • Rowan University
  • University of Maryland University College (UMUC)–B.S. Emergency Management, B.S., Homeland Security
 
Please contact the FCC Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471 for additional information.
FCC offers a tuition payment plan for students who wish to spread payment over several months.  Scholarship and loan assistance is available for eligible students. In addition to general scholarships and loans, the following scholarships are available to Respiratory Care students:
  • Frederick Medical Foundation Scholarship
  • Loats Foundation Scholarships
  • Respiratory Care Scholarship.

For complete scholarship information, contact the Financial Aid office.
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A. in Digital Media and Design and who are looking for transfer opportunities.  For more information , contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471 or the Program Manager at 301.846.2533.
  • Towson University – B.S. Electronic Media and Film: Film/Video/Digital Media Concentration
Students who achieve the ASL certificate have a strong foundation for further coursework in American Sign Language, interpreting, and education of the Deaf or related fields. This certificate can be used to meet the elective requirements of FCC’s Associate of Arts degree in general studies.

With the A.A. degree, students can transfer to one of the many institutions with which FCC has articulation (transfer) agreements. These agreements assist students in a smooth transition from one institution to the other.

For more information on schools that have articulation agreements with FCC, visit the Counseling & Advising Office, Enrollment Services Building, J201, or call 301.846.2471.
FCC provides a tuition payment plan. Scholarship and loan assistance is available for eligible students. Please refer to the separate scholarship application, and apply before the deadline. In addition to general scholarships, the following are available to surgical technology students:
  • Frederick Memorial Foundation Scholarship
  • Loats Foundation Scholarship
  • Joseph and Margaret Droll Memorial Scholarship

Note: Scholarships are also available to students enrolled in ST programs from the Association of Surgical Technologists and from the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting. Please refer to the websites,  applications and apply before the deadlines.  


For more information, visit the Financial Aid Office, Enrollment Services Building, J-301, or call 301.846.2480.

Q. How long does it take to complete the Associate degree and certificate programs?

A: The Associate program takes four semesters (2-years) full-time, including an internship. The 30 credit Certificate takes 1.5 years. The short term Certificate takes two semesters (1 year) and the Letter of Recognition takes one semester.

Q: When can I start classes at FCC?

A: Courses for the Letter of Recognition and certificates begin in the fall and spring. For courses for the degree program, the enrollment periods are any semester including January and summer.

Q: How many credits and what classes should I register for my first semester?

A: New early childhood students should take a minimum of six  (6) credits by registering for ED 100 Child Development and Behavior (3) and ECD 104 Activities I for Children which are both offered for completion in one semester.

Q. Can I begin working in the field of Early Childhood after I complete my courses?

A. Upon completing the courses students will meet the educational requirements for the state of Maryland Office of Child Care for positions of Lead Teacher for Preschool, School Age, Infant/Toddler and Director depending on what program or certificate they completed.

Q: Can I transfer credit for courses taken from another school?

A. Eligibility will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis during the advisement process.

Q: What does it cost to attend FCC?

A: The Fall 2011 total in-county tuition cost for six (6) credits is approximately $819.10 plus books. More information can be found on the tuition and fees page of our web site. We encourage students to apply for financial aid. Our financial aid representatives can then work with you to determine your aid package, your eligibility for grants, loans, and need- and merit-based scholarships.

Q: What scholarships do you offer?

A: FCC offers a wide variety of need- and merit-based scholarships, and we encourage you to apply for them. In addition, while you are a student here you will periodically receive information on industry-based scholarship opportunities.

Q: How do I apply for financial aid?

A: Contact the Financial Aid office 301.864.2480 and file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. FCC’s Federal Code is 002071.
Computer Studies
Students will be able to:
  1. Prepare a plan that addresses organizational needs.
  2. Identify problem requirements that demonstrate understanding of user and technical needs.
  3. Design problem solution that solves the requirements.
  4. Integrate hardware, software and security models that facilitate project outcomes.
Healthcare Computer Technology
Students will be able to:
  1. Design and develop information systems and processes that improve quality, effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare operations.
  2. Provide data management and analysis in order to ensure healthcare specific data security.
  3. Evaluate the impact of information technology on the clinical process, clinical outcome, organizations, and resources.·  
  4. Implement policies and procedures in order to protect the privacy and security of patient health information.·
  5. Explain healthcare-related requirements and prepare/conduct auditing to ensure compliance.

Personal Computer Support Specialist
Students will be able to:
  1. Identify problem requirements that demonstrate understanding of user and technical needs.
  2. Analyze alternative solutions to determine the optimal result.
  3. Design problem solution that solves the requirements.
  4. Integrate hardware, software and communications models that facilitate project outcomes. 
Software Specialist Certificate
Students will be able to:
  1. Identify problem requirements that demonstrate understanding of user needs.
  2. Explain solutions that satisfy problem requirements.
  3. Design problem solution that solves the requirements.
  4. Integrate application software to facilitate requirement solutions.
For students who complete the A.A.S. degree in Police Science, FCC has articulation (transfer) agreements with:
  • University of Maryland University College – B.S. Criminal Justice, B.S. Homeland Security
  • Mount Saint Mary’s University – B.A. Criminal Justice
  • Frostburg State University – B.S. Criminal Justice
  • American Public University Systems (APUS) – B.S. Criminal Justice
  • American Military University (AMU) – B.S. Criminal Justice
  • Johns Hopkins University also recognizes the FCC A.A.S. degree toward a bachelor’s degree.

For more information, call the Police Science program manager at 301.846.2673.
   
SLO # Student Learning Outcome
SLO #1 Demonstrate competence discovering, applying, and thinking critically about basic business, accounting, and computing concepts and trends. 
SLO #2 Identify and analyze ethical issues in business. 
SLO #3 Communicate effectively using multiple communication methods (oral, written, graphic, and electronic). 
SLO #4 Apply computing technologies to solve business problems 
Students will be able to:
  • Interpret and apply blueprints and schematics to a construction project within the trade.
  • Create a cost estimate of a specific project to include materials, equipment, and labor.
  • Evaluate a construction project to select and operate appropriate tools, equipment, and materials.
  • Apply principles of safety to equipment usage and materials handling on a construction work site.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and apply appropriate building codes to complete a construction project.
  • Install, troubleshoot and/or repair equipment toward completion of a project to meet job specifications.

Students Applying for Admission to Clinicals


If you are applying to the clinical portion of the nursing program, you will need to take the Math Aptitude Test as part of the admission criteria. NOTE: The Math Aptitude Test is scheduled AFTER the nursing application deadline. Please see the information regarding TEAS (which is schedule BEFORE the nursing application deadline) as an additional criteria for admission to the nursing program. Students do not take the test before or when they apply for nursing clinicals.  Students will be notified on the nursing website when the testing dates are scheduled.
 

Admission to Clincals Math Aptitude Test

 

If you are applying to the clinical portion of the nursing program, the Math Aptitude Test is one of the criteria used for admission. Students applying for clinicals must contact the Testing Center (301.846.2522) in advance to schedule an appointment to take this test. Testing is held in February for fall ADN admission, March for LPN-to-ADN Transition admission and September for spring ADN admission.

The test can only be taken once per admission cycle and points are earned based on the results. Currently, 2 points are earned for a score of 95-100% and 1 point is earned for a score of 90%. No points are earned for less than 90%. Please refer here for all the requirements concerning the point breakdown for ADN admission. Please refer here for LPN-to-ADN Transition admission criteria


Medication Safety is of the utmost concern as you pursue your goal of becoming a Registered Nurse. Your math skills will assist you to be successful in the nursing program and your career.


The principles that will be tested include:
  • Convert measurements within the metric system
  • Calculate household measurements
  • Convert household to metric measurements
  • Calculate proportions
  • Solve an algebraic formula/equation for x
  • Solve multiplication and division problems with decimals
  • Solve problems that include fractions
  • Convert minutes to hours and calculate time (including international time)
  • Solve word problems
  • Perform normal rounding
 
The following conversions must be learned for best results:
 
1 fluid ounce = 30 milliliters 1 ounce = 28.35 grams 1 hour = 60 minutes
1 teaspoon = 5 milliliters 1 foot = 0.3048 meters 1 minute = 60 seconds
1 tablespoon = 15 milliliters 1 gram = 1000 milligrams 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds
1 cup = 240 milliliters    

Downloads and Links

Test Schedule

The Math Aptitude test for Spring 2017 ADN admission will be administered during the month of September 2016.  Applicants must call the Testing Center at 301.846.2522 to schedule the test.  You must bring a photo ID with you.  Testing should take between 30-60 minutes to complete.

The dates/times are as followed:  

Spring 2017 ADN Admission (call Testing Center for appointment after 8/22/16)

DAY

DATE

TIME

Wednesday September 28

9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Thursday

September 29

9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Friday

September 30

9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Saturday

October 1 

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Monday

October 3

9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday

October 4

9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.



 

In accordance with the policies of many of our clinical facilities as well as in compliance with the recommendations of the National Council, State Boards of Nursing and the Maryland Board of Nursing, Frederick Community College’s Nursing Program requires all nursing students to have a criminal background check and drug screening.  This background check and drug screening will be completed PRIOR to full admittance to the program and may be repeated during the program as deemed necessary. 
 
All students must be successfully cleared via this background check and drug screening to be admitted to the clinical facilities.  If a student is not successfully cleared, the student may not enter the clinical setting and, therefore, will be unable to meet the Nursing Program’s requirements. 
 
If, during the program, a student tests positive for an illegal or un-prescribed drug, the student will be immediately terminated from the program.
 
Program applicants are advised that the Maryland Board of Nursing as well as other State Boards of Nursing may deny licensure to any individual they deem to be unsuitable for the practice of nursing.  Examples include, but are not limited to, falsifying application information, habitual intoxication and/or narcotic addiction, convictions or “nolo contendere” pleas for felonies or crimes of moral turpitude, whether or not appears of other proceedings are pending or in progress (Maryland Nurse Practice Act).

Success Rate
The Program achieved an 85% pass rate over consecutive five year periods for the graduates on national certification examinations. The calculated pass rate includes all examination attempts by program graduates.

 

2011

ARRT

NMTCB

Average

Passing Examinees

2

7

 

Not Passing Examinees

0

0

 

Total Examinees

2

7

 

Pass Rate %

100

100

100

2012

ARRT

NMTCB

Average

Passing Examinees

1

7

 

Not Passing Examinees

0

0

 

Total Examinees

1

7

 

Pass Rate %

100

100

100

2013

ARRT

NMTCB

Average

Passing Examinees

0

8

 

Not Passing Examinees

0

0

 

Total Examinees

0

8

 

Pass Rate %

N/A

100

100

2014

ARRT

NMTCB

Average

Passing Examinees

0

4

 

Not Passing Examinees

1

1

 

Total Examinees

1

5

 

Pass Rate %

0

80

40

No graduates for 2015.


2015

ARRT

NMTCB

Average

Passing Examinees

 

 

 

Not Passing Examinees

 

 

 

Total Examinees

 

 

 

Pass Rate %

 

 

 

FCC has transfer agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A. in Human Services and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
  • Stevenson University – B.S. Human Services 
For students who complete the A.A.S. degree in Surgical Technology, FCC has articulation (transfer) agreements with:
  • University of Baltimore – B.S. Health Systems Management,
  • University of Baltimore at Shady Grove – B.S. Health Systems Management, and
  • Towson University – B.T.P.S. Allied Health.

For more information, visit the Counseling & Advising Office, Enrollment Services Building, J-201, or call 301.846.2471.
For students who complete the A.A.S. degree in Bioprocessing Technology, FCC has articulation (transfer) agreements with:
  • Hood College – B.A. Biology (http://www.hood.edu/)
  • Stevenson University – B.S. Biotechnology (http://www.stevenson.edu/)
  • University of Maryland University College – B.T.P.S. Biotechnology, B.S. Laboratory Management 

What business degree programs does FCC offer?

  • Two bbusiness programs are offered:  Business Administration, and Business Management.  In addition there are several shorter certificates.

Why should a student major in business?

  • The business field is dynamic, global, and constantly changing. Whether you want to start your own business or work for another business in areas like marketing, management, financial services, healthcare, human resources, business consulting, logistics, or project management, you will need education in business. 

What is an AA degree in Business Administration - Transfer?

  • This program is designed to prepare students to transfer to and major in business at a four-year college or university.  It articulates completely with most Maryland colleges.  Two years (approximately 60 college credits) at FCC provide the qualifications to be a business major at another school where a further specialization can be in finance, accounting, marketing, human resource management or other areas of interest.  By getting an A.A. degree at FCC, you earn about half the credits you need to get a bachelor’s degree, and save money as well.  About 80% of our business majors choose this option, due to the increased educational requirements for most professional level jobs in business.

What is an AAS degree in Business Management - Career?

  • If a student is interested in becoming an entrepreneur or in advancing to a higher level in a current position, business management offers courses to make this happen.  Flexible course options help the student tailor their program to specific needs.  The program is very flexible and many courses will transfer to other colleges if a four-year college becomes an option.

Are there specific differences between these two degrees?

  • The biggest difference is that the Transfer degree requires more general education courses and fewer technical courses, which makes this degree easier to transfer to four year colleges. The Career degree requires fewer general education courses and more technical courses since it is focused on immediate employment or advancement. Both degrees require approximately 60 college credits.

What purpose is served by certificates?

  • Certificates are a stepping stone allowing a student to take technical business courses and receive recognition for those accomplishments, while still allowing students to use these courses to complete a degree over time. 

Who teaches FCC’s business courses?

  • Our full time and adjunct faculty typically have a master’s degree (or higher) in their field of study, and almost all have significant actual real world experience in business.  In the classroom they integrate real world experience, hands on activities, and textbook theory.

Where can current information be obtained about these programs?

  • The program manager for business studies can help students decide if a business career is realistic for them.  One way to get started is to enroll in Introduction to Business (BU103),  an overview course required for all business students,  exposing them to many facets of business, including management, marketing, entrepreneurship, planning, human resources, operations, and finance.
The Culinary Arts & Hospitality Institute at FCC benefits from the guidance of an advisory committee that represents the culinary and hospitality field and the professional and educational communities.
The members are:

Gary Brooks

Owner/ Operator                       
Barley and Hops Grill & Microbrewery

Phil Bowers

President
Fountain Rock Management Group

Rayford Cook

Managing Partner
Bone Fish Grill

Rafael Fuentes

Executive Chef
Holiday Inn & Conference Center

Eddie Hillton ‘04

Alumnus

Randy Jones

Owner Operator            
Café 611

Raymond Maldo

General Manager/CEO
The Comus Inn at Sugarloaf Mountain

Terry Mason

Executive Chef
Danielle’s

Randy Olmstead

Owner Operator
The Perfect Truffle

Peter Plamondon, Jr.

Chairperson/President
Plamondon Companies, Inc.

Peter Plamondon, Sr.

Co-President
Plamondon Companies, Inc.

Todd Raynolds, CEC

Executive Chef
Fountain Head Country Club

Kyle Roberson

Executive Chef
Musket Ridge Golf Club

Donna Sowers

Manager, Food Services
Frederick Community College

Krystal Turner '05

Event Planner/ Alumnuae
The Lodge at Summit Ridge

Chef Dave Verdrager

Specialty Buyer
G.Cefalu’ & Bro. Inc.

Donald Wharton Jr.

Department Chairperson
Forestville Military Academy

Jack D. Walker

Executive Chef/ General Manager
Firestone’s Restaurant & Bar

Rich Walther

Human Resource Director
Food Pro Company

Charlie Zachmann

Culinary Arts Instructor
Frederick High School

Culinary Arts & Hospitality Institute

The Culinary Arts and Hospitality programs at FCC provide students with the strong culinary foundation and practical skills necessary to succeed in the food service industry. Through hands-on preparation, students develop skills in fundamental cooking techniques required in a commercial kitchen. Equally grounded in culinary arts and management, the Associate of Applied Science degree content prepares students for entry-level cooking and supervisory positions in the hospitality industry.

Core culinary courses are aligned with the American Culinary Federation Accrediting Commission’s core culinary knowledge and skills competencies, which have been set by industry leaders in both culinary arts and culinary arts education.
 

Culinary Skills Certificate

The Culinary Skills certificate program prepares students for entry-level cooking jobs in hotels, restaurants, supermarkets, country clubs, catering companies, cafés and institutional kitchens.

Courses teach:
  • basic hot and cold food preparation,
  • food production, presentation, and service skills,
  • proper work habits and professionalism, and
  • nutrition, food safety and sanitation procedures.


Hospitality Management Certificate

The Hospitality Management certificate program prepares students for entry-level, supervisory positions in the hospitality industry. Courses teach knowledge and marketable skills in the areas of supervision, communication, and basic financial control procedures. Completion of the certificate, combined with appropriate work experience, can lead to positions such as restaurant supervisor, catering service manager, hotel front office supervisor, meeting and event coordinator, food purchasing agent, and housekeeping supervisor.
 

Culinary Arts & Supervision A.A.S. Degree

The A.A.S. degree program prepares students to assume positions as trained culinary professionals in a variety of food service settings including full-service restaurants, hotels, resorts, country clubs, catering, contract food service, and health care facilities. Courses emphasize the professional competencies necessary to meet industry standards. Graduates should qualify for entry-level positions such as line cook, station chef, and assistant pastry chef. With experience, graduates may advance to positions such as sous chef, executive chef, or food service manager or continue on to four-year academic programs.

All courses in the Culinary Arts Skills certificate program and the Hospitality Management Certificate program can be applied to the A.A.S. degree program. Students in the degree program complete additional General Education courses.
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Nuclear Medicine Technology and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
  • University of Baltimore- B.S. Health Systems Management
  • University of Baltimore at Shady Grove- B.S. Health Systems Management
FCC provides a tuition payment plan. Scholarship and loan assistance is available for eligible students. In addition to general scholarships, the following are available to business management students:
  • Routzahn Business Scholarship
  • Frederick Gas Company Scholarship
  • Mercantile/F&M Bank Scholarship
  • Linton & Co. Scholarship
  • Maryland National Bank Scholarship
  • Morgan-Keller Scholarship
  • Alan P.Linton Scholarship
  • James & Dorothy Dinnis Entrepeneurial Scholarship
  • Ron N. Young &W. Bert Anderson City Scholarship
  • Walter P. Feaga Scholarship
For students who complete the A.A.S. degree in Respiratory Care, FCC has articulation (transfer) agreements with:
  • University of Baltimore – B.S. Health Systems Management,
  • University of Baltimore at Shady Grove – B.S. Health Systems Management, and
  • Towson University – B.T.P.S Allied Health.
 For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471. The Counseling & Advising office or Career & Transfer Center can also help students plan for transfer to any program that offers a Bachelor’s degree in Respiratory Care.

2016 Surgical Technology Open House Dates 
Beginning Monday, February 3, 2016
5:30 - 7:30 p.m

Drop in anytime 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Library Building, room L-107 lab.
Informal, drop-in format.
Meet faculty, students, and working Surgical Technology Professionals.
 
Mondays Wednesdays
April 11, 18, 25
May 2 (Closed 9, 16, 23, 30)
June 6, 13, 20

 
February 3, 10, 17, 24
March 2, 9, 16, 30 (Closed 23) 
April 6 (Switch to Mondays) 
September 7, 14, 21, 28
October 5 (Last open house in 2016) 
Note: Closed July and August



Click here for a PDF version of the campus map.

Clinical Students


If you are currently enrolled in courses beginning with a NU designation, you will need to take the Math for Medication Safety test prior to the start of each semester.

Math for Medication Safety 
  • Practice Test  
  • Test Schedule (see below)
  • Free Internet Links for Dosage Calculation Practice (see below)
All clinical nursing students enrolled in the Summer 2016 semester are required to pass the Math for Medication Safety Test with a 95% on or before May 20, 2016 or will be dismissed from the program. It is in the student's best interest to take the test as soon as possible (avoid waiting until the last moment). 
 
All clinical nursing students enrolled in the Fall 2016 semester are required to pass the Math for Medication Safety Test with a 95% on or before August 16, 2016 or will be dismissed from the program. It is in the student's best interest to take the test as soon as possible (avoid waiting until the last moment). 

The Math for Medication Safety Test is a proctored online format. Only approved nursing calculators can be used during the test. Blank paper will be provided. If a student is unsuccessful on the first attempt, the online program will provide feedback for any missed questions. Students not meeting the standard of 95% after 1 attempt must contact the nursing program office (L-114; 301.846.2524) before being able to take a second attempt. After two unsuccessful attempts, the student must complete a remediation packet. Students needing remediation should email Jane Menker for further information. Failure to succeed on the third attempt will result in the student's withdrawal from the program. Readmission to the program in a future semester is on a space available basis.

In order to prepare for this format, a practice test is available for your review. It is extremely important that you visit this site PRIOR to taking the Math for Medication Safety Test to gain familiarity with the format. *The test has been updated to include weight based dosage calculations.

There will be 20 dosage calculation problems on each test. Content review should include:

1.       Conversion between units of measure (metric and household)
2.       IV flow rates and infusion times (including international time)
3.       Interpreting drug labels and calculating dosage from the label information
4.       Reconstitution of drugs from a powder including calculation of dose
5.       Weight based dosage calculation

All tests will be given in the Testing Center. Students must call the Testing Center (301.846.2522) to schedule a date/time. Appointments will be accepted starting on April 18, 2016 for the Summer 2016 semester, and on July 11, 2016 for the Fall 2016 semester. The last test will be administered 30 minutes prior to the end of the session. Students will be required to show a picture ID and follow all Testing Center security procedures.

Any questions or concerns, please contact Jane Menker.


Test Schedule for  Fall 2016 Semester:

Only clinical nursing students enrolled in NU101, NU211, NU212, NU213, NU214 and NU216. Students are required to call the Testing Center (301.846.2522) to schedule the test after July 11, 2016. Please note: the Testing Center hours have changed.
 
DAY DATE TIME
Wednesday August 10 9:00am  -  5:30pm
Thursday August 11 9:00am  -  5:30pm
Friday August 12 9:00am  -  3:00pm
Saturday August 13 9:00am - 10:30am
Monday August 15 9:00am  -  5:30pm
Tuesday August 16 9:00am  -  5:30am


Downloads and Links
Free Internet Links for Dosage Calculation Practice
 
DosageHelp.com
Test and Calc

Students can review content pertaining to the Math for Medication Safety test prior to attempting the test. A review of dosage calculations is available free on the intranet at the above sites. In addition, students should be able to calculate infusion times in hours/minutes and answer questions in international/military time.
FCC’s Monroe Center, 200 Monroe Avenue, Frederick, Maryland, 21701, is located just 3.5 miles from our main campus. The center contains state-of-the-art labs, classroom space and equipment for the building trades. 



 
Test of Essential Academic Skills Version 5 (TEAS V)

The Frederick Community College Associate Degree in Nursing, Licensed Practical Nursing Certificate and LPN to ADN programs now require applicants to complete the nationally-normed test for nursing students known as the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS).  Applicants will not be considered for admission to these three programs until they have placed into the category of Proficient, Advanced, or Exemplary (See Table 2).  If a student does not complete the TEAS test, their application will not be evaluated.  Please read all of the following material before registering to take the TEAS V.

Frequently Asked Questions about the TEAS

WHAT IS THE TEAS?
  • The TEAS is a multiple-choice test used to measure student testing ability in the areas of math, reading, English, and science.  The version of the TEAS that FCC administers is the TEAS V.  The TEAS test is created by a nursing education company called Assessment Technologies Institute, LLC (ATI).  For more information about ATI, please visit www.atitesting.com
  • Because many LPN applicants will take the TEAS before they take a Math course, the score for the mathematics portion of the TEAS will not be considered.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE TEAS?
  • Students who wish to apply for admission to FCC's Associate’s Degree in Nursing Program (including LPN-RN applicants) or Licensed Practical Nursing Certificate program must take the TEAS before the admission deadline for the respective program. 

WHEN SHOULD I TAKE THE TEAS?
  • Students must register for and take the TEAS test prior to their appropriate application deadline.  Ideally, applicants should complete the TEAS prior to submitting their application to the program.
  • It is recommended that students wait to take the TEAS until after developmental level courses are complete.  This will not be possible for a small number of Practical Nursing applicants due to the timing of the LPN admission cycle.  In the case of such students, simply wait to take the TEAS until as many developmental courses as possible are complete.  The TEAS must still be completed prior to the application deadline.

WHAT WILL I NEED TO REGISTER FOR THE TEAS?
  • Students will need their FCC ID number, a credit card, internet-access, and an e-mail address to complete the online registration. 
  • The application online can be found online at www.atitesting.com and the applicant will need to create an account.  It is important to remember the username and password, as it is needed to access the TEAS on test day.

WHEN IS THE TEAS OFFERED?
  • Please refer to the ATI website at www.atitesting.com for testing dates and locations..
  • More TEAS dates will be scheduled after January 4, 2015 for Fall 2015 applicants.  Students must complete the TEAS before the application deadline of February 1st.
  • Follow the Registration Instructions below to see more details about test dates and times.

REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE TEAS V:
  • Click on the following link and follow the directions below to register and pay for the TEAS test on the ATI website, or copy and paste www.atitesting.com into your browser.
  • On the right, above the log-in fields, click on the link and follow the instructions to “Create an Account with ATI.”
  •  Continue on the website for choosing the institution where the exam will be taken.
  • Drop down menus will appear.  Select "Maryland" in the state field and "Frederick" in the city field and click the "NEXT" button.
  • You should then see the upcoming dates the TEAS will be offered here at FCC.  Click the "Register" link next to the date on which you wish to take the TEAS V.
  • A summary will appear and the applicant can verify the order is correct, then continue and pay for the TEAS appointment with a credit card. 
  • When prompted, choose "ADN" for the Associate’s Degree in Nursing or RN program and "PN" for the Practical Nursing Certificate program.  Ignore any other option that may appear.

WHERE SHOULD I GO ON MY SCHEDULED TEST DATE?
  • Tests are held on the main campus at the FCC Testing Center, L-104.  Nursing applicants should report to the reception desk in L-104 15-minutes before the scheduled appointment.  If unfamiliar with the campus, please call 301-846-2522 for further directions or to have concerns addressed prior to arriving on campus.

HOW LONG DOES THE TEST TAKE?
  • Nursing applicants should allow four (4) hours to take the test.  Please arrive early, as tests will start promptly at the scheduled times.  Nursing applicants will not be allowed to test upon late arrival, and will forfeit testing fees.  Nursing applicants are able to reschedule by following the Registration Instructions listed above.

 WHAT SHOULD I BRING TO THE TEST?
  • Nursing applicants must arrive to the Testing Center with a valid Photo ID with signature (US Government or US State issued ID such as a driver’s license), FCC student ID number, and a copy of your ATI e-mail confirmation as proof of payment. No other items, such as cell phones or food/drink, are permitted.  Writing materials will be provided by the FCC Testing Center for calculations. Calculators are not allowed during the TEAS test.

HOW MUCH DOES THE TEST COST?
  • The cost of the test is $80.00.  Students are required to pre-pay and pre-register for the TEAS test (see registration instructions above).  Payment is made online at the time of registration and can be made by credit or bank card.  Non-FCC students applying to other programs must pay an additional $30 upon arriving at the Testing Center for their appointment.  The FCC Testing Center accepts cash, check made payable to FCC, and credit or bank cards.

WHAT IF I'VE ALREADY TAKEN THE TEAS AT ANOTHER SCHOOL?
  • TEAS V scores that are less than two years old are valid.  Nursing applicants must log into the ATI website and request that a copy of previous scores be sent to the FCC Testing Center.  FCC Testing Center contact information is available by clicking here.  Nursing applicants are responsible for indicating on the application that scores from another institution will be sent to FCC.
  • TEAS 3.0 or TEAS 4.0 scores are not valid for admission to the three nursing programs at FCC.
  • If TEAS V scores are more than 2 years old from the application deadline, the test must be taken again.

WHAT DO I DO ONCE I HAVE MY TEAS V SCORES?
  • When scores meet the minimum requirements:  A copy of the results must be submitted to the FCC Testing Center. When taking TEAS V at the FCC Testing Center, students will receive a printed copy of their scores soon after completion of the test.  Nursing applicants may request a personal copy of the results.  These will be verified with ATI once your score becomes official.  If the TEAS was taken somewhere other than FCC, students must request an official copy of their scores from ATI. ATI charges $27 for a transcript request and can be paid by credit or bank card.  Visit www.atitesting.com and log in.  Students need to attach exam results to the nursing clinical application.
  • When scores DO NOT meet the minimum requirements:  Nursing applicants will not be considered for admission to any of the three nursing programs.  Review materials are available for studying and applicants may retake the TEAS at least 30 days after their previous attempt.  See below for information about studying for and retaking the TEAS V.
  • How do I report my score?
    If the TEAS exam is taken at FCC, the student will print out 2 copies of the results. One copy is for the student, the other copy is for the Testing Center. At the end of the application process, the Testing Center will forward all test results to the nursing department. 

    If the TEAS exam is taken at a location other than FCC, the student is responsible for attaching a copy of their results to their nursing application.
     

HOW CAN I STUDY FOR THE TEAS?
  • ATI offers a study manual and two practice assessments for the TEAS V.  These study materials can be found on ATI 's website.  For information about study materials, click on "ATI Product Solutions" and "Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS)."
  • Students may also visit the FCC Bookstore to purchase TEAS V study materials.
  • Copies of the ATI Official study manual are available on reserve in the FCC Library L-200.  These copies cannot be checked out of the library and students should refrain from marking up the manuals.
  • There are other websites that offer TEAS prep material.  (Simply search online for "TEAS test prep" or "TEAS practice questions").  Students should take precaution, as many of these options are not specifically geared toward the TEAS V.
  • In general, first-year level classes at FCC should also be good preparation for the TEAS.  The Science portion of the TEAS does require some knowledge of general cell biology, basic chemistry, and topics covered in Anatomy & Physiology.

HOW OFTEN CAN I TAKE THE TEAS?
  • Students can only take the TEAS V twice during each admissions cycle. There is an admission cycle in the fall and spring semester each Academic Year.  Please consult the Nursing Department website for application due dates.
  • Tests must be paid for each time it is taken.  It is possible for a nursing applicant to take the TEAS V twice in each testing window, as long as the applicant schedules an appointment for one of the days offered in the beginning of the testing window dates. 
  • Students can only take the TEAS V once during any 30-day period.  Students who wish to take the TEAS V a second time must wait at least 30 days after the first attempt.

HOW LONG IS MY SCORE VALID?
  • FCC will accept TEAS V scores up to 2 years old.  TEAS scores that are more than 2 years old will not be considered.  The nursing applicant must test again to be considered for admission.

WHY DOES FCC REQUIRE THE TEAS TEST?
  • The TEAS V is used as a part of the admissions process in most Nursing programs across the nation.  The minimum scores to be accepted into FCC’s nursing programs have been determined by a committee of Nursing educators and assessment specialists and supported by peer-reviewed evidence. 

TEST OF ESSENTIAL ACADEMIC SKILLS VERSION V (TEAS V)
  • This test measures basic essential skills in the academic content areas of reading, mathematics, science and English.
  • All RN, PN, and LPN to AND Transition applicants must take this test before their application is submitted.  Applicants must score Proficient, Advance or Exemplary for their application to be included in the evaluation pool of candidates.  A copy of the TEAS result MUST be attached to your application.


Table 1
Academic Preparedness Categories and Descriptions
 
Category Description
Exemplary Exemplary scores generally indicate a very high level of overall academic preparedness
necessary to support learning of nursing-related content. Students at this level are not
likely to require additional preparation for the objectives assessed on TEAS.
Advanced Advanced scores generally indicate a high level of overall academic preparedness
necessary to support learning of nursing-related content. Students at this level are not
likely to require additional preparation for the objectives assessed on TEAS.
Proficient Proficient scores generally indicate a moderate level of overall academic preparedness
necessary to support learning of nursing-related content. Students at this level may
require additional preparation for some objectives assessed on TEAS (see Topics to
Review section of the score report).
Basic Basic scores generally indicate a low level of overall academic preparedness necessary
to support learning of nursing-related content. Students at this level are likely to require
additional preparation for many objectives assessed on TEAS (see Topics to Review
section of the score report).
Developmental Developmental scores generally indicate a very low level of overall academic
preparedness necessary to support learning of nursing-related content. Students at this
level will require additional preparation for most objectives assessed on TEAS (see
Topics to Review section of the score report).
 


Table 2
ATI Recommended Cut Scores and Percentage of Students in Each Category
 
Category Cut Percent of Students in Each Category
(N = 878)
Percent of Students in Each Category or higher
Exemplary 90.7% 1% 1%
 
Advanced 78.0% 16% 17%
 
Proficient 58.7% 47% 64%
 
Basic 41.3% 29% 93%
 
Developmental Less than 41.3% 7% 100%
 
 

Nuclear Medicine Technology Flow Chart


(updated flowchart coming soon)

Respiratory Care Prerequisite Flow Chart

FCC has an articulation agreement with the following institution for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Business Management and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
  • University of Maryland University College–B.S. Business Administration

Upcoming mandatory orientation sessions:

 
ST Class Orientation Room:  (Linganore Building)
Spring, 2017 Class Monday November 28, 2016 3:00-4:30 pm Rm L106
Fall, 2017 Class Monday, June 19, 2017 3:00-4:30 pm Rm L106
Spring, 2018 Class Monday, Oct. 23, 2017 3:00-4:30 pm Rm L106
 
At this time you will be given the program calendar,and the history and physical form; you will be sized for gowns and gloves, and provided the opportunity to request a clinical site and ask questions of current students and faculty. 

All interested students are welcome to attend. The program has two start dates: Spring and Fall. 

Culinary Scholarships

Scholarships have been established through the generosity of individuals, civic organizations and the business community to the Frederick Community College Foundation, Inc. The foundation manages the assets and determines the award level possible each year. To apply, complete the FCC scholarship application and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Scholarship decisions for the fall term will be made beginning June 1. Students should complete the college scholarship application to be eligible. For complete scholarship information, contact the Financial Aid office.

FCC Scholarships for Culinary Arts & Hospitality Students:
  • FoodPro Scholarship
  • Croghan Culinary Arts & Hospitality Institute Scholarship
  • Barbara Ann David Pacifico Memorial Hospitality Scholarship
  • The American Academy of Chefs/ American Culinary Federation Foundation Scholarships for College Students
  • Chaine des Rotisseurs Scholarship
  • Balestreri/Cutino Scholarship
  • Julia Child Memorial Scholarship
  • Ray & Gertrude Marshall Scholarship
  • Tomato Fest Scholarship
  • National Restaurant Association Scholarships for College Students:
  • GRI/ Giacomo Bologna Scholarship
  • AI Schuman Ecolab Undergraduate Entrepreneurial Scholarship
  • Coca-Cola Salute to Excellence Award Scholarship
  • NRAEF ManageFirst Program Scholarship
  • Diversity Scholarship Award
  • Corporate Co-Branded Scholarships
High School/ GED Graduate Scholarships
  • ProStart Student Scholarship
Graduates of high schools that have established articulation agreements with FCC will enjoy a seamless transition and advanced placement. Institutions that currently have articulation agreements are listed below:
  • Washington County Technical High School, Hospitality Services program
  • Frederick County Career and Tech Center, Culinary
  • Carroll County Career and Tech Center
Contact your high school for additional information.

FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Culinary Arts and Supervision and who are looking for transfer opportunities.  For more information , contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471 or the Program Manager at 301.624.2768.
  • Johnson & Wales University – B.S. Culinary Arts & Food Service Management
  • Stratford University – B.A. Culinary Management or B.A. Hospitality Management
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore at Shady Grove – B.S. Hotel & Restaurant Management

For more information, contact the Culinary Arts & Hospitality Program Manager at 301.788.9912

Therapist Multiple Choice Exam Detailed Content Outlines


This content matrix from the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC) provides detailed learning outcomes necessary for competent respiratory care practitioners. All Respiratory Care faculty and students can access this information for guidance in their classroom and clinical instruction. 

Therapist Multiple-Choice Examination

Clinical Simulation Examination


 

Certification in Surgical Technology (CST)  Awarded by the NBSTSA

 

Graduating Class  

 # of Graduates 

# Passing     

  %                

May, 2013  

15

14

93%

May, 2014 

20

20

100 %

May, 2015 

17

15 

88%

December, 2015 

7

88%

May, 2016 9 8 88%

 

Combined Associate Degree in Nursing and Bachelor of Science in Nursing
 
Students in the Associate Degree in Nursing Program at Frederick Community College may elect to pursue Frostburg State University’s RN-to-BSN program at any time. The student can initiate the enrollment process with FSU and will be granted early admission to FSU’s RN-to-BSN program as long as the student meets the admission requirements of the RN-to-BSN program and is in good standing at Frederick Community College. Students may also choose to pursue FSU’s RN-to-BSN program after completion of FCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing program. For further information and an appointment to talk to the Director of Nursing Education, please contact the Nursing Department at 301-846-2524.