Career
Catalog year 2015/2016

Prepares students as entry-level nuclear medicine technologists in a specialized area of diagnostic imaging which includes both body structure and function. Nuclear medicine technologists perform procedures to assist physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Recently the nuclear medicine field has expanded to include molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET), and fusion imaging using hybrid scanners, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT. The Nuclear Medicine Technology Program continues to obtain exemplary outcomes. 
 

In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted students will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum. Upon completion students will earn an AAS in Nuclear Medicine Technology and a certificate in Computed Tomography. Graduates will be qualified to take the national certification exams for nuclear medicine technology and the post primary certification in Computed Tomography. The combination of focus meets the expanding needs of nuclear medicine technology that includes dual modality imaging. Prerequisites for this program include EN 101, BI 103, BI 104, CH 101, MA 130, MA 206, PY 101 and MDA 108. All courses require a grade of “C” or better. 
 
  • Students must complete their credit English and Mathematics within the first 24 credits.
  • One general education course must meet the cultural competence graduation requirement. 
  • CORE: The General Education CORE is that foundation of the higher education curriculum providing a coherent intellectual experience for all students. Students should check with an advisor or the transfer institution (ARTSYS) before selecting General Education CORE requirements. http://www.acaff.usmh.usmd.edu/artweb/index.html
 
Course Credits
English
 
EN 101–English Composition 3
Mathematics
 
MA 130–College Algebra 3
MA 206–Elementary Statistics 3
Arts & Humanities
 
CMSP 105–Small Group Communication   3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
 
PS 101–General Psychology 3
Biological & Physical Sciences
 
BI 103–Anatomy & Physiology 4
BI 104–Anatomy & Physiology 4
CH 101–General Chemistry 4
PY 101–Survey of Physics  3
PE/Health Elective * 1/3
Departmental Requirements
 
NM 100–Physics and Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Technology  5
NM 102–Nuclear Medicine Technology  3
NM 103–Nuclear Medicine Techniques I  4
NM 104–Clinical Nuclear Medicine I  1
NM 105–Nuclear Medicine Techniques II  3
NM 107–Instrumentation and Computers in Nuclear Medicine Technology 4
NM 202–Clinical Nuclear Medicine II  2
NM 203–Radiopharmacy and Radiation Chemistry  2
NM 204–Clinical Nuclear Medicine III  4
NM 205–Professional Development  2
MDA 108–Basic Medical Terminology 1
Total 62/64


 

* Corrected per catalog addendum 15-16 v.1

Prepares students as entry-level nuclear medicine technologists in a specialized area of diagnostic imaging which includes both body structure and function. Nuclear medicine technologists perform procedures to assist physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Recently the nuclear medicine field has expanded to include molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET), and fusion imaging using hybrid scanners, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT.
 
Course Credits
Departmental Requirements 
 
NM 100–Physics and Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Technology 5
NM 102–Nuclear Medicine Technology 3
NM 103–Nuclear Medicine Techniques I 4
NM 104–Clinical Nuclear Medicine I 1
NM 105–Nuclear Medicine Techniques II 3
NM 107–Instrumentation and Computers in Nuclear Medicine Technology 4​​​
NM 202–Clinical Nuclear Medicine II 2
NM 203–Radiopharmacy and Radiation Chemistry 2
NM 204–Clinical Nuclear Medicine III 4
NM 205–Professional Development 2
Total 30


 
In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted student will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum. Upon completion students will earn a Certificate in Nuclear Medicine Technology and in Computed Tomography. Graduates will be qualified to take the national certification exams for nuclear medicine technology and the post primary certification in Computed Tomography. The combination of focus meets the expanding needs of nuclear medicine technology that includes dual modality imaging. Prerequisites for this program include EN 101, BI 103, BI 104, CH 101, MA 130, MA 206, PY 101 and MDA 108. All courses require a grade of “C” or better.
 

 
Prepares students as entry-level CT technologists who are responsible for operating sophisticated equipment, performing venipuncture, and monitoring patient’s radiation dose. Computed Tomography Technologist (CT) uses x-rays and a computer to acquire a set of data from multiple angles around the patients body and produce high-resolution cross-sectional images, known as tomographic slices. Innovations, including spiral/helical and multi-slice CT, mean that CT is a rapid technique with many applications. Students pursuing a post-primary pathway certification in CT must hold primary pathway registration with the ARRT (or in some cases, NMTCB) in an appropriate discipline and document completion of specific clinical experience requirements or be currently enrolled in the Nuclear Medicine Technology program.

 
Course Credits
Departmental Courses
 
NM 220–CT Principles & Instrumentation 3
NM 222–Cross-sectional Anatomy 3
NM 224–CT Protocols & Applications 3
NM 226–Clinical Practicum 3
Total 12

CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION TO THE NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM - FALL 2015
 
Students must submit a Nuclear Medicine Technology application to the Department of Allied Health and Wellness by the posted deadline April 1st for fall admission.  In addition, the following must be met:

Successful completion of the 8 core courses within 2 attempts of each course (EN 101, BI 103, BI 104, CH 101, PY 101, MA 130, MA 206 and MDA 108) by August prior to the program start date.*

Attainment of at least a “C” in all prerequisite coursework within 2 attempts of each course. ** A minimum overall GPA of 2.00 is required for previous core prerequisite college work.   Competitive GPAs for accepted applicants are typically much higher than the minimum requirements. 

Have all official transcripts from colleges/universities sent to the Welcome and Registration Center by April 1st.

All applicants must document at least four hours of shadowing/observation in nuclear medicine technology, prior to or concurrent with application. ***Additional shadowing (40-50 hrs.) is recommended for applicants who have no prior health care work experience. This experience can be arranged by contacting a convenient institutional imaging or therapy department. Documentation must be submitted on the day of your application interview.  Please have the department complete the verification form indicating that the shadowing/observation was conducted.  

Submission of a 1-2 page paper discussing your shadowing experience.  All papers must be typed; double spaced, printed and stapled, and must include your name and FCC Student ID number.  Papers not meeting these criteria will not be accepted or reviewed.  Please see rubric for grading guide. 

The selection process is based on a point system.  The points will only be assigned to those students that have applied to Frederick Community College and also completed and submitted the Application for Nuclear Medicine Technology. 
 
Admission decisions are based on the successful completion of course requirements; college grade point averages from the eight core prerequisites; and assessment of motivation, knowledge of the discipline(s) and personal qualities appropriate for the profession and for successful completion of the program. 
 
Students with the highest point total will be accepted conditionally into the Nuclear Medicine Program and will be informed of their status on or before May 1st.  Students with equal point values will be ordered by GPA from highest to lowest.  Students not gaining admittance to the Nuclear Medicine Program and wishing to be considered for the next year must reapply.
 
*Acceptance is contingent upon earning grades of "C" or better in any prerequisites being completed in the spring and summer semesters.
 
** 2 attempts includes transfer credits.
 
***This is only a recommendation.  It is not mandated for program admission.  
 
*To be completed by Department of Allied Health and Wellness*

NAME _________________________________
TOTAL POINT VALUE____________________
GPA ___________________________________ 
 


SUBJECT POINT VALUE POINTS EARNED
EN 101 1  
BI 103 1  
BI 104 1  
CH 101 1  
PY 101 1  
MA 130 1  
MA 206 1  
MDA 108 1  
FREDERICK, CARROLL, OR
HOWARD COUNTY RESIDENT
1  
GPA  4.00 – 3.50
3.49 – 3.00
2.99 – 2.50
2.49 – 2.00
5
4
3
2
 
SHADOWING PAPER 2  
TOTAL 16  


Frederick Community College prohibits discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenship status, color, creed, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, genetic information, marital status, mental or physical disability, national origin, race, religious affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status in its activities, admissions, educational programs, and employment.
How many students are accepted into the NMT Program?
13 seats are available

What is the difference between Nuclear Medicine and Radiology?
The main difference between Nuclear Medicine (including PET) and all other diagnostic modalities is that Nuclear Medicine demonstrates function (physiology) as well as structure (anatomy) of organs or organ systems.
 
How can you work safely around radiation?
You can work safely around radiation by following a few simple precautions:
  1. Use time, distance, shielding, and containment to reduce exposure.
  2. Wear dosimeters (e.g., film, TLD or OSL badges) if issued.
  3. FCC provides students with whole body and ring badges to monitor radiation exposure on a quarterly basis.  At the end of the program students are provided with an end wearer report to document their exposure for the length of time within the program. 
  4. Avoid contact with the contamination.  
  5. Wear protective clothing that, if contaminated, can be removed. 
  6. Wash with nonabrasive soap and water any part of the body that may have come in contact with the contamination.  
  7. Assume that all materials, equipment, and personnel that came in contact with the contamination are contaminated. Radiological monitoring is recommended before leaving the scene.
 
How long does it take to finish the NMT Program?
Recently the nuclear medicine field has expanded to include molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET), and fusion imaging using hybrid scanners, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT.  In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted student will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum after completion of the 8 core prerequisites.
 
Will classes taken at another college transfer?
A student who has completed any or all of the general education (pre-requisite) courses required in either of the nuclear medicine program may transfer those courses into the program from an accredited college or university. Only grades of “C” or better may be applied toward the nuclear medicine program.
 
To obtain an evaluation of your college credits, the student must request an official transcript to be sent from the transfer school. The Transfer Services Specialist will evaluate the credits and transfer in any courses that may equate to FCC courses in the major. The maximum number of credits accepted as transfer to FCC is 45.
 
What pre-requisites are required for the Nuclear Medicine Program?
BI103 - Anatomy & Physiology I
BI104 - Anatomy & Physiology II
CH101- General Chemistry
PY101 – Survey  of Physics
EN101 - English Composition I
MA130 – College Algebra
MA206 - Elementary Statistics
MDA108 – Basic Medical Terminology
 
When do the Nuclear Medicine Technology clinical classes begin?
Nuclear Medicine Clinical rotations begin the first semester of the program, fall semester. 
 
How do I apply for admission into the Nuclear Medicine Technology?
Applications for can be found on the FCC web site www.frederick.edu.  If you are not currently enrolled at FCC, you must apply to FCC before applying to the NMT Program.
 
When is the application deadline for the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program?
The deadline to apply to the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program is April 1st for best consideration.  Rolling admission until all seats are filled.  
 
Which healthcare facilities are utilized for the clinical experiences?
Didactic instruction is held on campus while clinical instruction takes place at one of our affiliated clinical sites.  Students will be required to rotate to at least two clinical sites during the duration of the program.
Current affiliated sites include: 
  • Frederick Memorial Hospital
  • Community Radiology
  • Montgomery General Hospital
  • Northwest Hospital Center
  • Baltimore Washington Medical Center
  • Union Memorial Hospital
  • Shady Grove Adventist Hospital
  • Washington Adventist Hospital
  • Inova Leesburg
  • Chambersburg Hospital 
 
What other requirements are there for nuclear medicine technology program?
  • Prospective students need to be aware that nuclear medicine involves contact with communicable diseases. Students must attend a yearly seminar on universal precautions for blood-borne pathogens and other hazards as required by OSHA.
  • Background check and drug screening.
  • Uniforms are required for clinical learning experiences. All students must wear the official school uniform.
  • Current CPR Certification (American Heart Association Health Care Provider Course)
  • All students entering nuclear medicine technology programs must meet the following health requirements:
  1. Physical exam
  2. Screening test for tuberculosis (annual)
  3. Rubella, Rubeola and Mumps titre and immunization, if necessary
  4. Varicella (chicken pox) titre and immunization, if necessary
  5. Hepatitis B screening, vaccine if necessary, or written waiver
  6. Any specific requirements of an agency
  • Conviction of a felony may prohibit the student from gaining licensure.
 
Will conviction of a felony or misdemeanor prohibit me from entering the nuclear medicine technology program?
 
No it will not. However, conviction of a felony or misdemeanor may prohibit the student from taking the licensure exam.
 
 
 
The objectives of the program are to develop professional entry-level Nuclear Medicine Technologist who will be able to:

  1. Perform all functions according to established policies, procedures, regulatory and accreditation requirements, as well as applicable professional standards.
  2. Produce images providing optimal information obtained with appropriate technique.
  3. Communicate in a professional, positive and tactful manner with patients, physicians, nurses, other health-care and non-health-care employees, as well as fellow clinical personnel.
  4. Maintain patient confidentiality and exercise ethical judgment, integrity, honesty, dependability and accountability in the performance of one’s responsibilities.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to trouble shoot and notify appropriate personnel.
  6. Assume responsibility for one’s work and for professional development.
  7. Apply critical thinking and problem solving in making decisions about imaging exams.
  8. Abide to the guidelines set forth by the Patient Bill of Rights.
  9. Adhere to the SNMTS Code of Ethics in professional practice.
Nuclear medicine technologists operate equipment that detects and maps radioactive trace materials put into a patient’s body to create diagnostic images. The images are produced on a computer screen or film for diagnosis by the healthcare team. Nuclear medicine can be used to obtain information about the structure and function of virtually every major organ system of the body.

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging modality used in determining the presence and severity of cancers, neurological conditions, and cardiovascular disease. It is currently the most effective way to check for cancer recurrences.

PET images demonstrate the chemistry of organs and other tissues such as tumors. A radiopharmaceutical, such as FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), which includes both sugar (glucose) and a radionuclide (a radioactive element) that gives off signals, is injected into the patient, and its emissions are measured by a PET scanner.

CT uses X-ray and computer to obtain a cross-sectional image of the human body. When X-rays are irradiated on the human body, some of the rays are absorbed and some pass through the body to produce an image.  In plain X-ray imaging, the film directly absorbs penetrated X-rays. In CT scanning, an electronic device called a "detector array" absorbs the penetrated X-rays, measures the X-ray amount, and transmits the data to a computer system. A sophisticated computer system, in turn, calculates and analyzes data from each detector in each level, and finally reconstructs multiple, two-dimensional, cross-sectional images.

Prepares students as entry-level nuclear medicine technologists in a specialized area of diagnostic imaging which includes both body structure and function. Nuclear medicine technologists perform procedures to assist physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Recently the nuclear medicine field has expanded to include molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET), and fusion imaging using hybrid scanners, such as PET/CT and SPECT/CT.  In order to meet the new demands within the field accepted student will dedicate three (3) semesters or 12 months to the NMT curriculum and the two (2) semesters (6 months) to the dedicated CT curriculum

The program combines scientific research techniques with hands-on application in classroom and clinical environments. Students learn from imaging professionals who bring real-world experience to the classroom.
 
Graduates may work in hospitals, physicians’ offices and diagnostic imaging centers. Upon completion students will earn an AAS in Nuclear Medicine Technology and a Certificate in Computed Tomography.   Graduates will be qualified to take the national certification exams for nuclear medicine technology and the post primary certification in Computed Tomography. The combination of focus meets the expanding needs of nuclear medicine technology that includes dual modality imaging.  The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT).
 
FCC’s Nuclear Medicine Technology program teaches students:
  • skills for patient care,
  • diagnostic and therapeutic procedures,
  • radiation safety,
  • radiopharmacy,
  • instrumentation,
  • quality control,
  • manipulation of clinical data, and
  • how to perform phlebotomy.

Program Goals

FCC will provide students with gratifying learning experiences and career opportunities in a learning environment that will enable them:
  • the ability to competently perform responsibilities regarding patient care, quality control, diagnostic procedures, radiopharmaceuticals, radionuclide therapies, in vivo diagnostic testing, in vitro diagnostic testing, transmission imaging and radiation safety.
  • critical thinking skills essential in the practice of nuclear medicine technology.
  • a high level of ethical and professional standards.
  • the ability to facilitate the needs of the community to understand nuclear medicine technology.
  • effective communication techniques required to interact successfully with patients and other members of the health care team.
  • values for a commitment to lifelong learning.
  • the ability to represent cultural diversity.
 

Program Benefits

  • Study in small cohort of 13 students
  • Learn from imaging professionals who bring real-world experience to the classroom
  • Combine scientific research techniques with hands-on application
  • Graduate with the potential to be dual certified 
 

Skills You Will Learn

Knowledge in learning activities associated with
  • Patient care
  • Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures
  • Radiation safety
  • Radiopharmacy
  • Instrumentation
  • Quality control
  • Manipulation of clinical data
  • Performing phlebotomy


Skills You Will Need

  • Communication skills sufficient to teach others, explain procedures, interact with others and convey information in writing
  • Provide services with compassion and respect
  • Provide care without discrimination
  • Confidentiality in accordance with state and federal regulations
  • Compliance with laws and regulations
  • Ability to recognize emergency situations and take appropriate actions
  • Emotional stability to assume responsibility for actions, provide patients with emotional support, adapt to environmental stress, and monitor own emotions
 

Job Shadowing

Job shadowing is a short-term experience designed to give students an up-close look at how an employee or group of workers do their jobs. All applicants must document at least four hours of shadowing/observation in nuclear medicine technology, prior to or concurrent with application to the program. Please contact Michele Tertel for a list of preferred sites to complete your clinical shadowing.
Success Rate
The Nuclear Medicine Technology Program continues to obtain exemplary outcomes. The graduating class of 2014 achieved the following.

 
ACADEMIC PROGRAM NUMBER OF STUDENTS PROGRAM COMPLETION RATE
 
Nuclear Medicine
ENTERED GRADUATED  
           100%
4 5
 
CERTIFICATION PASS RATES NMTCB ARRT
# Passing on first attempt 4 0
# Not passing on first attempt 1 1
Total examinees 5 1
Pass Rate 80% 0%
FCC has articulation agreements with the following institutions for students graduating with an A.A.S. in Nuclear Medicine Technology and who are looking for transfer opportunities. For more information, contact the Counseling & Advising Office at 301.846.2471.
  • University of Baltimore- B.S. Health Systems Management
  • University of Baltimore at Shady Grove- B.S. Health Systems Management

Nuclear Medicine Technology Flow Chart


(updated flowchart coming soon)